Ball Lab – Srixon Z-Star Ball Review
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Ball Lab – Srixon Z-Star Ball Review

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Ball Lab – Srixon Z-Star Ball Review

MyGolfSpy Ball Lab is where we quantify the quality and consistency of the golf balls on the market to help you find the best ball for your money. Today, we’re taking a look at the Srixon Z-Star. An overview of the equipment we use can be found here. To learn more about our test process, how we define “bad” balls and our True Price metric, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

a photo of Srixon Z Star golf balls inside the MyGolfSpy ball lab

I hadn’t expected to be circling back around to Srixon so quickly after the Q-Star Tour review but given those findings, many of you were intensely curious about what we’d find with Srixon’s true Tour offerings.

In an informal poll posted on Twitter last week, Z-Star was the overwhelming choice for the next review. No recount necessary. So here we are.

Will the Z-Star positively differentiate itself from the Q-Star Tour? Is there a redemption story to be had withing this Srixon Z-Star review?

Let’s find out.

About the Srixon Z-Star

The Srixon Z-Star is a three-piece urethane “Tour” (i.e., PGA TOUR) offering. It is played on the PGA TOUR with some regularity.

Data collected during MyGolfSpy’s 2019 Ball Test suggests the Srixon Z-Star is a mid-launch, mid-spin ball. While the retail price is $39.99 at the time of this writing, the Z-Star is currently available on a “buy two, get one free” special.

All of the balls in our Srixon Z-Star sample were manufactured at Srixon’s factory in Japan. This is notable because the Q-Star Tours we tested were made at the company’s plant in Indonesia. Whether there’s a quality difference between factories is something we’ll be looking at as we continue to test Srixon balls.

Srixon Z-Star – Compression

a compression chart for the Srixon Z Star golf ball

On our gauge, the average compression of the Srixon Z-Star is 88. Across the market as a whole, that qualifies as firm, though it’s fair to describe Z-Star as soft by Tour standards. You can think of it as splitting the difference between the Bridgestone Tour B XS (likely the softest ball played on Tour) and the Titleist Pro V1.

Srixon Z-Star – Weight and Diameter

  • None of the balls in the Srixon Z-Star sample failed to meet our standard for roundness.
  • None of the balls tested exceeded the USGA weight limit of 1.620 ounces.

That’s certainly an improvement over our previous Srixon Z-Star review.

We found no notable issues with weight, size or roundness, though I’d be remiss not to mention that Srixon Z-Star runs both a tad big and a tad light for the Tour category. There’s potentially a small speed penalty in that.

Srixon Z-Star – Inspection

This graphic details our inspection of the core of the srixon z star golf ball.

Centeredness and Concentricity

As with the Q-Star Tour, rating the guts of the Srixon Z-Star poses a little bit of a challenge. The mantle is often indistinguishable from Srixon’s super-thin covers. That makes problems with cover thickness more difficult to spot and also makes centeredness and concentricity issues a bit easier to identify.

It also makes some people think we don’t know what we’re talking about when we say it’s a three-piece ball.

During the visual inspection, we flagged six percent of our sample as bad. As with Q-Star Tour, the issue was predominantly the thickness of the mantle layer. Zero percent is ideal but, frankly, six percent isn’t bad at all.

Minor defects (again, small layer concentricity issues) unlikely to cause performance issues were noted in just a bit more than a quarter of the sample.

a photo of the core of a srixon z star golf ball

Core color consistency was generally excellent. We again found visible bits of regrind, which is typically not cause for concern.

Cover

The covers and Spin Skin coating of the Srixon Z-Star balls in our sample were generally clean and free from defect.

General Observations

As noted previously, Srixon makes the thinnest cover in golf and while some of its competitors will say there is a point of diminishing returns, lack of greenside spin should not be a concern.

Z-Star Consistency

In this section, we detail the consistency of the Srixon Z-Star. It’s a measure of how similar the balls in our sample were to one another, relative to all of the models we’ve tested to date.

This graphic details the consistency of the srixon z star golf ball

Weight Consistency

  • Consistency (of weight) across the Srixon Z-Star is average.
  • Weight variation between the heaviest and lightest ball in the sample was minimal.

Diameter Consistency

  • Diameter consistency relative to the other balls in our database is average (approaching high-average).
  • Not only was every ball in the sample round, the average diameter from one ball to the next is reasonably consistent with nothing standing out as unusually large or unusually small relative to the sample as a whole.

Compression Consistency

Given the issues we found with Q-Star Tour, average consistency is plenty good enough here.

As it was with the Q-Star Tour, the average compression across all the balls in our Z-Star sample is a bit better than average. When everything comes together, it’s a ball that falls in the average range for compression consistency.

True Price

True Price is how we quantify the quality of a golf ball. It's a projection of what you'd have to spend to ensure you get 12 good balls.

The True Price will always be equal to or greater than the retail price. The greater the difference between the retail price and the True Price, the more you should be concerned about the quality of the ball.

Srixon Z-Star Review – Summary Report

To learn more about our test process, how we define “bad” balls and our True Price metric, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

This graphic details the true price of the srixon z star golf ball.

The Good

The Srixon Z-Star is a significant step-up in quality and consistency from the Q-Star Tour and is generally what we would describe as a good ball.

The Bad

With a couple of bad balls in the mix, the Srixon Z-Star isn’t perfect and the IBCR remains a bit of a concern.

True Price

The True Price of Srixon Z-Star is $42.39. That represents a six-percent increase over MSRP. Under normal circumstances, that’s a solid result but with Srixon currently running a “buy two, get one free” special, there’s outstanding bang for the buck to be had right now.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

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      Dennis

      10 months ago

      I’ve been playing z stars for a few years and absolutely loved them.. until one day on maybe the 5th hole I noticed a raised seam that is not only visible but after a few drives you can get a fingernail on it.
      This applies to YELLOW only!!
      I reached out to Srixon and they don’t have an answer… i went to my local big box and opens up a brand new box of yellow and you can see the seam, clearly.
      Every ball that I own has it too… what gives?!
      I have gone over to TP5’s for now… I really want to find out why is up with the yellow z star.
      Once I can feel the seam with my fingernail I wonder if that has any performance changes?!?
      Golf is a mental game, so this one bothers me a bunch.
      Thanks

      Reply

      Gary Pelletier

      3 years ago

      I can confirm the findings on ball made in Indonesia. I have been playing Srixon XV’s for years due to them going on sale Boxing Day for $27. This year for the first time I am retiring balls during the round due to cracking. Happened again this week. I still play Ping Eye2 + copper irons a couple of times a year and the first time I saw the crack on the ball was playing these irons and surmised it was the iron. I can now confirm the cover is not durable and all balls were made in Indonesia.
      I will never buy a Srixon made in Indonesia again. Cracking the cover after a couple of holes is unacceptable and after reading this reticle it’s not me. . Better value in buying a ProV.

      Reply

      ML McDowell

      3 years ago

      Wonder why your samples are Japan, when Amazon just sent me z star and z star IV made in Indonesia.

      Reply

      ML McDowell

      3 years ago

      Just received, from Amazon, my Z star tour yellow MADE IN INDONESIA. worst balls I’ve ever seen. You can actually see the seams jagged line on some,. cover defects on others. They are going back. I have a dozen Z star IV coming later. I hope they are not made in Indonesia, but if they are, their going back as well.

      Reply

      Kelin

      3 years ago

      Been playing Z-stars for about a year now and I have been very impressed. Excellent spin around the greens, plenty of distance off the tee compared to other brands and consistent throughout. Play at a 0-1 handicap and can get everything I want out of this ball. For the price , there really isn’t a better bang for your buck, not that everyone is looking for that. I look for the best ball that will give me optimal performance and this ball does that, all while being 15-20 bucks cheaper than competitors. No brainer if you ask me.

      Reply

      Michael

      3 years ago

      All of the Srixons (more than 10 dozen for me and my son) I’ve purchased at Golf Galaxy/Dick’s Sporting Goods over the last couple of years have been made in Indonesia. Which makes me wonder if some of the “Big Box” and/or retail channels are getting balls made in Indonesia, while the green grass shops are getting balls made in Japan. I can see a retailer justifying this as a business decision…buying millions of golf balls at even larger discounts so they can sell them at higher margins.

      That being said, I’ve seen zero quality issues with their balls. From my own experience (former college player / played in numerous national and regional amateur events), I think the Z-Star is the straightest flying “Tour” quality ball on the market. I sometimes hit shots that I think are going to draw or fade too much, and they seem to straighten out. My own personal on-course testing has them about 2-3 yards shorter than the Pro V1-X with the driver. Best value on the market when you do their Buy 2 Get 1, with no sacrifices in performance.

      Reply

      Miguel

      3 years ago

      I just got the Z-STAR XV Three for Two deal. I was at a PGA Tour Superstore and checked all boxes on their shelves for the JAPAN manufacturing. None to be found. I still bought three dozen and hopefully they will play well. Any word on how the Japanese manufacturing boxes get distributed? Is ordering from Srixon directly a better way to do it?

      Reply

      SaladDodger

      3 years ago

      I have played the Z Star in the UK and for the sale price above it looks to be a bargain, almost wherever it is made. So long as you balance them A ball that has a similar feel is the Decathlon Inesis Tour 900 (new ones are £22 per dozen).

      Tony, will you test the latest version of the Inesis Tour 900, as it would be of interest to me and other users of the ball in the UK and France?

      Reply

      Juanma

      3 years ago

      Spanish users too! I tested some inesis tour 900 and liked the feeling a lot.

      Reply

      HP

      3 years ago

      While the ball labs are a good test of quality that are an indicator of performance they are nowhere near as useful as the performance ball tests that MGS did last year. The Shot Area results told me pretty much all I needed to know about ball consistency.

      Reply

      Drew

      3 years ago

      Where did you guys purchase your Z-Stars from for the test? I bought some Z-Stars last year with a promotion and they are made in Indonesia. Would just like to have the best chances of ordering a dozen from a place that gets theirs from the plant in Japan. Appreciate all your guys’ research!

      Reply

      bob

      3 years ago

      I have two boxes of Z Stars I bought last year and it says they are manufactured in Haiti. Can you do a ball test if I send you a sleeve to test how the Haitian Srixons will perform?

      Reply

      Walter

      3 years ago

      Tony, With all the tests you do for each ball, why don’t you include a balance test by using something like the “Check Go” Pro, or the salt water test. I’ve used these tests and it sure weeds out the poorly balanced balls in a hurry. Actually I prefer the salt water test better.

      Reply

      Brandon

      3 years ago

      How would this compare to the Z-Star XV?

      Reply

      Bill Giering

      3 years ago

      Hss anyone ever compared used golf balls to new balls?
      How about if a ball is cold or hot,?
      Thanks, Bill

      Reply

      ST

      3 years ago

      Would love to have you fit golf balls to players and publish the data. Sure you can find out the characteristics of a ball based on robot but having 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, and 15 plus HCP testing balls with driver, irons, wedges, chips, and putts, would be spectacular.

      Reply

      Jeremiah

      3 years ago

      So im confused, These were manufactured in Japan, I have 8 dozen of the 5 series z stars and 2 dozen of the new 6 series z stars, also have some Q Star tours, they are ALL made in Indonesia, except a sleeve of Kelly Green Q Star Tours that say made in Japan. I have gotten these at various places, golf course, golf headquarters, tgw, and Amazon, so is there any way to test Japan q star tours and Indonesia Z stars because im stressing out, is it the plant or what, I think highly of your test, and look forward to the podcast, thank you from Kansas.

      Reply

      Joe

      3 years ago

      I have the same question as above, my four dozen z stars are from Indonesia.

      Reply

      Lindsay E

      3 years ago

      Why in the world do you have TEN DOZEN golf balls? Also, you probably have 50 dozen used ones? Maybe you need lessons so that 2 or 3 dozen get you through the golf season?

      Reply

      Jeremiah

      3 years ago

      Well sir to answer your question as to why I have 10 dozen balls, when I can get them on sale for around $20-$22, a dozen I will at that price, never paid more than that for z stars, and I put 4 dozen in a den caddy bag that I take to practice my chipping and putting with, practice with the ball you play with right! I kept the boxes, that’s how I know where they were made, thank you and have a good day

      Lou

      3 years ago

      Thanks for your reviews. Most of these balls you’ve tested are being replaced by new models next year. I know Titleist has new Pro V’s., TaylorMade new TP5’s, Srixon new Star V’s. How about testing a TaylorMade Tour Response? Seems like a good ball. I’ve played it and like it. Fits my game and budget. It was new this year so won’t be replaced next year. Thanks.

      Reply

      Michael Lambert

      3 years ago

      Tony, you may be the “loneliest man in golf” at golf merchandise shows after bringing actual testing to the golf ball industry! (“Psst.. He’s the guy who killed the OblongGolfBallCo!!”) Quality variances between plant locations are a fact of life for manufacturers. In the auto business, some plant closings were as much about persistent quality problems as anything else.

      Reply

      TheDokes

      3 years ago

      I played the Z-star throughout the summer. Found it sufficiently long off the tee, but almost one club shorter from 155 yds in – too much spin I guess. The ball stopped on a dime on the green and has an adequate feel in putting. Unlike the Q-Star I found no quirkiness in ball flight – it stayed on the path I delivered (good or bad.) I’m a seventy old year, 230 off the tee, & an 11 handicapper. All in all, not a bad ball, but I’ll likely change to Snell for the upcoming season.

      Reply

      Michael

      3 years ago

      If too much spin, which resulted in lack of distance, inside 155 yards was your concern, I suspect you’ll find that the Snell MTB-X will perform even worse for you. It spins quite a bit more than the Z-Star. In my opinion, the Z-Star is on the lower end of the spin spectrum for golf balls actually used by professional golfers, but only by a small percentage.

      Reply

      Randy R

      3 years ago

      I was happy and surprised to see the review of the Z-Star. Honestly, with all the different brands of golf balls out there I didn’t think you’d get back to this brand. However, I was disappointed when I read that the version you tested were from Japan. I bought 4 dozen last Father’s Day and they were all made in Indonesia. I still wonder if there is a quality control issue with Srixon in Indonesia.

      Reply

      Walter

      3 years ago

      Hey Tony, thanks again for the the great review. I too am interested in seeing if the two factories produce different results. As well I’m also interested in the XV test.
      Are you going to do a spreadsheet to summarize all these ball tests at the end?

      Reply

      Dave

      3 years ago

      Yes…I too would like to see a summary spread sheet..would be very helpful

      Reply

      Steven M.

      3 years ago

      Although I really appreciate your testing and reviews, I believe you should note the “Tour” ball played by the professionals IS NOT the same off the shelf “Tour” ball in your retail centers. The QA from the manufacture guarantees a prefect ball to the professional player. These balls even go through an MRI scan!

      Reply

      Steven

      3 years ago

      I know this is about the Z-star but I would like to update my experience with Srixon and the Q-star pro. They replaced my 4 dozen and I’ve tested 2dozen for balance and I may have 3 balls that are fine. They all are from Indonesia. I think I’ll start looking for a different ball/ manufacturer for next year.I didn’t like the z-star

      Reply

      Tim

      3 years ago

      Thanks for getting to this one so quickly, I currently play the Z Star XV ball, I’ve been getting the 2019 model off Amazon for $24.99/dozen so it’s a bargain for a tour quality ball.

      I did recently pick up a box of the Gen 6 model and I noticed some cracking on the cover after 5 or 6 holes of play.

      Reply

      Garen Eggleston

      3 years ago

      Just pulled the trigger on the buy 2 get 1

      Reply

      James W

      3 years ago

      I’ve played Z Stars for about five years. Usually they have a two for one promotion in May or June. This year I paid $21 dozen after the discount. This is the best ball for the best price deal you will find. .

      Reply

      Shawn

      3 years ago

      So Im a bit confused.. I can only assume that the yellow specs are how they are saying 3 pcs ball. I am so used to seeing more layers. Am I right about this?

      Reply

      Tap In

      3 years ago

      If you look at the bottom portion of the cut ball picture you can see the layers more clearly. The cover is super thin and then the mantle layer is also white so it is hard to see where one ends and the other begins. So those two plus the core makes 3-pieces.

      Reply

      Paulo

      3 years ago

      Always amazed by the standard of golf the golfwrx readers achieve to the point they can tell which country a ball is made in by the way it performs.. here are some pretty hard facts to swallow. In 99.9% of cases your inconsistency in your game outweighs any defects and almost certainly the country the ball is made makes no difference to you.

      Reply

      Michael Lambert

      3 years ago

      Absolutely – however, knowing my swing varies doesn’t mean variances in the ball are irrelevant. I am trying to reduce that variance, and knowing my ball will be consistent means I know the variances belong to me, not the ball. Incidentally, I play “everyday (aka Kirkland)” balls most rounds, but when I am really focused on my game (wagering) default to ProVIs, knowing they are the most consistent balls available.

      Reply

      Paulo

      3 years ago

      You telling yourself that is only harming your game.

      scott

      2 years ago

      These are the same golfers who hit a bad shot then say a guy three holes over was talking during his back swing. I find used golf balls don’t go a far because of the extra weight in your wallet slows your back swing

      Reply

      HP

      3 years ago

      Switched to Z Star with the new 2019 version and works great for me. Have both made in Japan and Indonesia and don’t notice a difference. Have a couple dozen left and with winter coming think I will wait to see if new version for 2021 before buying more. Hopefully if new in 2021 it will be BOGO or 3 for 2

      Reply

      Marco

      3 years ago

      Test the AVX

      Reply

      Paulo

      3 years ago

      Hi Marco , we will do it soon

      Reply

      Dave Bryce

      3 years ago

      Very good ball, one of the best value balls for good golfers (70s/ 80s)!!

      Reply

      Bob

      3 years ago

      Hey! Tony,
      Having heard about range balls being used in play . Several country clubs chastising members on non range use.

      Would it be possible to do a test on range balls ? . To determine the best one.

      Reply

      scott

      2 years ago

      There called Range Ball you pay to hit them not steal them. If you want to spend less for balls buy used ones.they’ll cost less then half that of new ones.. Depending on brand of range ball they fly 10 to 15 percent less then brand new ones. There is a reason there used on the range and one of them isn’t for you to steal.

      Reply

      Andy

      3 years ago

      I had really hoped for the Z-Star balls tested are made in Indonesia., it would also be great have you guys discuss the Q-Star desaster at your weekly NPG.
      Otherwise, thank you Tony for your great work!

      Reply

      Andy

      3 years ago

      I had really hoped for the Z-Star balls tested are made in Indonesia., it would also be great have you guys discuss the Q-Star desaster at your weekly NPG.
      Otherwise, thank you Tony for your great work!

      Reply

      Large chris

      3 years ago

      I used to play Z Star a lot five years and more ago, really liked it.
      Picked up some 2019 balls on close out and… pretty disappointed, not what I remember. Seemed firmer, with less spin and feel green side.
      I wouldn’t say I was particularly fussy at all, I can swap in Bridgestone for Titleist easily, and Wilson FG when available,
      Z star doesn’t seem to be what it was sadly,

      Reply

      CampagnoloBob

      3 years ago

      This Ball Lab review confirms a suspicion I had from the Q Star Tour Ball Lab results- only buy Srixon balls manufactured in Japan. I plan to take advantage of the Srixon Z-Star promotion and while I hate to go out to a retailer (most are over an hour drive away), I will in order to verify the country of manufacture. It is also apparent that Srixon will be launching a new tour quality version of their balls in the near future (given the promotional price of the current Z-Star Gen-6 version).

      Reply

      SImms

      3 years ago

      It is very clear WHERE the balls are made does make a difference for the hard core low handicap player. Just reading how some of the smaller ball brands move from one manufacture to another shows even they find quality issues with some manufacture’s. as some have noted many of us have bought Z-Star models with different home addresses…It has to cost less to make a ball in Indonesia, China, Korea then one made in Japan. and odds are the ball made in Japan gets premium quality control.

      Reply

      Stevegp

      3 years ago

      Tony, thank you again for your efforts in bringing us these golf ball quality-of-manufacture reports. I play both the Z-Star and the XV model balls, so I appreciate reading your findings.

      Over the last few years, I have stocked up on Srixon close-out and two-for-one sales. I still have a few dozen from previous years. I just quickly looked at where they were manufactured, since this seems to be of interest. The Z-Stars I have from 2019 were manufactured in Japan. The versions I have from 2015 and 2017 were both made in Indonesia. Whether this will prove to be important remains to be seen.

      Reply

      Jeff

      3 years ago

      Well done, MGS, and smart to include this quickly after the Q-Star Tour findings. Question for Tony or anyone else — how can you tell if the Z Stars you’re buying are from Japan or Indonesia?

      Reply

      Andy

      3 years ago

      It is written on the 3 ball sleeve.

      Reply

      Alex

      3 years ago

      At first I was indifferent on the ball testing, but I think the Q star tour test regained my interest. As I work for a manufacturing company, however, I too am curious on the differences on factories as I have learned not all factories are alike. I like to buy golf balls in bulk. To me the risk is still here on getting 6 dozen from a different factory, with different quality… keep up the good work!

      Reply

      Max R

      3 years ago

      Excellent review as usual.

      Reply

      Scott

      3 years ago

      I think you might have missed the mark here. To be sure of the source of the quality issue, the test should have been done with balls of Indonesian manufacture, in order to either confirm or eliminate that variable. Now those if us with Indonesian made Z Star/XV stock are left to wonder….

      Reply

      Kyle Sakaguchi

      3 years ago

      I was curious, I play the Z-Star, and I’ve noticed the current ones I play (4th Generation Spin Skin) are made in Indonesia, while my older ones (3rd Generation Spin Skin) are made in Japan.
      The ones you tested, were they 3rd or 4th?
      Or are they manufacturing in different countries for different regions?

      Reply

      ryebread

      3 years ago

      Tony: I think there’s no better performance for the $ ball (IMHO) than a Z Star XV. Are you planning on looking at that ball?

      One thing of interest is that I have personally see a LOT of cover breaks with newer XVs. At first I thought it was a fluke, but I’ve now seen it with easily a dozen of my balls. If I don’t pump them OB off the tee (hey I’m not all that great), I’m splitting them. It’s not thinned shots, or something hitting a tree. The cover snaps on a flushed iron that typically follows a good drive.

      It’s not just me, but also has been experienced by other friends who are playing them. I think Srixon may have that cover a little too thin. It’d be interesting to see if the cover thickness on the XV were materially different than the “regular” Z.

      Reply

      Colin

      3 years ago

      Exactly my issue with the XVs – cover splits ! Maybe three in six balls. No trees involved. Once the circumference split is visible the ball performance is less stable and sounds very different.

      Reply

      Luc Lacoursiere

      3 years ago

      I had the same problem all summer with my Srixon Z-Star XV. One shot and ripped cover!

      I still have 3 dozens to go through next summer…

      Reply

      Vincent

      3 years ago

      Yeah, I can confirm as well. I played some XV for a while and found that the cover is super fragile. I played some Bridgestone Tour B, to compare, and they last far longer.

      Reply

      Darren Tan

      3 years ago

      Thanks for the review. I’m worried about my few dozens of Z Star though because they are from Indonesia. Bought 6 boxes in total due to the Buy 2 get 1 free promos recently.

      Reply

      Dave

      3 years ago

      The sighs of relief are deafening (mine included) after reading this article. Those Srixon ZStar ball deals are too good to pass up on.

      Reply

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