TESTED: Stability Shaft (vs) Standard Putter Shaft
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TESTED: Stability Shaft (vs) Standard Putter Shaft

TESTED: Stability Shaft (vs) Standard Putter Shaft

You may have seen them on tour, or in your Sunday foursome – whether it’s an Odyssey Stroke Lab or one of Barney Adams’ Breakthrough Golf Technology Stability Shafts, multi-material putter shafts are re-emerging as the new hotness in putter technology. Bottom line, there’s some buzz around this new piece of technology. So we put it to the test.

For this lab, we took two identical Bettinardi BB1 putters, one with the stock steel shaft, and the other with the Stability Shaft, and tested them side by side.

WHAT IS THE STABILITY SHAFT?

Breakthrough Golf Technology says that the typical steel putter shafts have a fixed flex point which isn’t sufficient enough to handle the weight of modern putter heads. What you get is instability both in flex and in rotation during the stroke (especially on off-center hits). The folks over at BGT took modern materials science and developed a putter shaft that is designed to fix this common problem.

What looks like a bit like driver shaft with a putter at the end of it, the Stability Shaft is composed of eight layers of high modulus carbon fiber with a stainless steel tip. A 22-gram aluminum insert gives weight to the structure and provides additional flexural rigidity. Breakthrough Golf Technology (BGT) states that its shaft is not only stiffer but also dramatically reduces torsional rotation.

Simply put, this putter shaft ain’t supposed to move.

BGT says it limits unwanted movement by 25% (without limiting feel) and reduces torque by almost 50%. This ultra-stiff shaft is made specifically to help you stroke the putter more consistently and deliver the clubface squarer at impact.

THE TEST

To keep our test putters as identical as possible, we reached out to Bettinardi Golf. The company provided us with two identical BB1 putters. The two putters have the same loft, same lie, same weight, and the same grip. The only difference: one was built with the standard steel shaft common to most every putter on retail shelves, the other was outfitted with the Breakthrough Golf Stability Shaft.

For the test itself, we put ten golfers through the same protocols we use during Most Wanted Testing. Testers hit a series of putts from 5, 10 and 20 feet with each putter. We counted the total number of putts for each tester, calculated confidence intervals, and looked for any significant performance differences. At 10 feet we utilized Foresight Sports GCQuad Essential Putting Module to capture both ball and club head data – this would allow us to see differences (if any) that existed in how the putter was delivered.

Results

For this test (and many others at MyGolfSpy), we take a multifaceted approach to analyzing the data we collect. For this comparison, we’ll first look at the launch monitor data captured by our Foresight GCQuad. From there, we’ll dive into the raw putting data (total putts, averages, etc.) and finish with an examination of the statistical reliability of the putt counts.

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LAUNCH MONITOR DATA

The Foresight GCQuad Essential Putting Module captures both ball and club data during a putt. That means that in addition to standard launch metrics (ball speed, launch angle, launch direction, spin, etc.), we also get metrics like skid distance, time to roll, and more. While most of these values were mostly consistent across shafts, we noted a few areas where appreciable differences were recorded. Note: launch monitor data was collected for 10′ putts only.

Observations

  • The biggest difference we observed was in the starting direction. The Stability Shaft produced a straighter starting direction with a smaller standard deviation. This is especially important when putting because it’s essential that putts start on the intended line.
  • The angle of attack for the Stability Shaft was about half that of the stock shaft; however, the standard deviation was slightly higher. The data suggests the club was delivered at a shallower angle, although somewhat less consistently.
  • Differences in club path and face to path are also apparent in the data. Testers delivered the Stability Shaft with more of an in-to-out path and a more closed face angle.
  • The Vertical Impact data is particularly interesting. The stock shaft was stuck, on average, higher on the face than the Stability Shaft, which was struck just .03 millimeters from face center on average.

TOTAL PUTTS

Observing club data provides insight into differences in how the clubhead was delivered, but it doesn’t necessarily offer a full accounting of performance. For that, as we do in all our putter tests, we compare performance at three distances to see if launch monitor differences translate to higher make percentages. Different doesn’t always mean better

Observations

  • Testers holed out in fewer putts at 5 and 10 feet with the Stability Shaft.
  • At 20′ feet, the stock shaft produced slightly better performance.
  • Overall, the BGT Stability Shaft produced better results in terms of raw putt counts, resulting in a higher Strokes Gained value.

STATISTICAL RELIABILITY

Finally, we look to see whether or not the results are statistically reliable. The chart below shows the strength of each putter at the three distances tested. We want to see how often the Stability Shaft or the Stock Shaft was in what we call the Top Group across the entire test pool. With only two putters – or in this case, putter shafts – in the field, the performance permutations are limited. For each tester, the top performing shaft will be either reliably better or statistically no different from the other.

Observations

  • Data from across the testing pool yielded little evidence of a universally reliable performance advantage for the Stability Shaft.
  • The Stability Shaft was reliably better for a few golfers in our testing pool at both 5 and 10 feet, with 10′ regarded as the most important of the three distances we test.
  • At 20′, performance was largely similar, though one golfer did show reliably better performance from the stock shaft.

CONCLUSION

There is some evidence to suggest that the Breakthrough Golf Technology Stability can produce a more consistent stroke, but our test doesn’t yield a result that would suggest it’s truly a breakthrough. The technology shows promise and our data suggests that some, though far from all, golfers will perform better with it. As with most other pieces of golf equipment, we recommend you invest in a thorough fitting process to determine if the Stability Shaft can help you hole more putts.

Now it’s your turn – have you or will you be trying The Stability Shaft soon? Let us know YOUR thoughts in the comments section below.

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      Justin

      3 years ago

      How easy it is to change the length of these shafts?

      Reply

      Jeff

      4 years ago

      Sorry guys, but you went down the middle here using a traditional shaped and weighted putter. Would love to have seen testing using a heavier mallet type putter (which heavier weights) which has a greater torque differential and possible distance control issues due to the softer flexing (standard) shaft having a spring effect on longer putts causing inconsistencies. I installed the firmer KBS CT-Tour putter shaft in my TaylorMade Mullen-2 mallet putter with 20 extra grams of weight and noticed a marked difference in shaft flex. I feel a stiffer shaft for a heavier mallet putter will give more consistent distance control on longer putts over 20 feet.

      Reply

      Don

      4 years ago

      I have this shaft on a heavy mallet putter. I have a steel shaft in the same version putter head. It took me about a week of counter balancing to replicate feel. I love the putter shaft and I think it contributes mostly on longer putts. It is very solid. I am a good putter with a low handicap. It takes a lot for me to change anything about my putter. I’m keeping this one in the bag.
      If you are thinking a shaft will fix putting issues, it won’t. I’d look at your grip and swing MOI before anything. Then again, I love new equipment.

      Reply

      Don

      4 years ago

      How much difference did the stiffness and lower torque of the shaft make, and now much was due to the shaft being a good bit heavier? You should do the test again with the standard shaft and one putter with a heavier shaft, but of standard design and see what happens. For the price of the shaft, I doubt most golfers would fine the high price worth it.

      Reply

      Jeff

      4 years ago

      Don, I believe the point of the test is not putter weight, but comparing a stiffer a more ridgid (less torque) putter shaft for more consistent putting. I recently purchased the stiffer KBS CT-Tour putter shaft and did notice a difference in the stiffness. I prefer the stiffer shaft on a heavy mallet putter. The shaft was only $30 and another $30 to install at a local club maker.

      Reply

      Eugene Murphy

      4 years ago

      I currently have a pxg mustang C putter with a stability shaft fitted very different feel 5ft puts rolling then very stable long putts remarkably consistent on length possibly 1 to 2 shot reduction absolutely love is I will have this putter till I die expensive but worth it.

      Reply

      CJ

      4 years ago

      From what I gather is that this shaft is a 125gram shaft which seems heavy but with a 350 Gram head it will keep the Swing weight lower, kind of like counter balanced putters. Also that the fact that this is an ultra stiff shaft, therefore less flex and virtually no twisting as a putter stroke is only like a 10 inch backswing.

      I would like to see a test with a putter shafted with an X Stiff wedge shaft at 125grams and see results. I’ve tried it and it is super stable and feels great. Though I’d like to see some data on that as a wedge shaft is much cheaper.

      just my .02

      CJ

      Reply

      Helen Castonguay

      4 years ago

      If this was the first time testers used the stability shaft might practice with it improve the data in its favour?

      Reply

      Francis Sullivan

      4 years ago

      Couple of months ago I bought the Odyssey stroke lab Tuttle. From putts inside 20 feet I believe I am putting much better my handicap has come down two shots… I wish you would do a test on these putters also!

      Reply

      EaglesWin!

      4 years ago

      I play a Bettinardi Center shafted B1 Heavy putter and wouldn’t touch it.

      Reply

      GRK

      4 years ago

      Won’t touch it so you have no idea whether it works or not. ???

      Reply

      Arnold W Augustin

      4 years ago

      The inventor talked about heavier heads and how this helped to stabilize.

      I bought one for that reason. It has really helped my putting and particularly on the 5 feet and in range. I don’t think your test using a blade was done correctly.
      You might wish to revisit your procedure! TXG did a test and they were confident in the ability of the shaft. I have used an earlier version of this shaft on a Scotty mallet and it produced a better feel and forward directianal stability. I bought this after reviewing the TXG reviews and after seeing yours I might have been dissuaded and then would not have experience a significant improvement.
      Your article on Ball accuracy convinced me to try a Srixon for the first time.

      So my advice is that one should try the shaft and judge for yourself and make sure that the putter is similar to the one that you like and is of a heavier nature as described by Adams.

      Reply

      KM

      4 years ago

      Once again MGS is in the business of preventing business. Its a 4.5% difference in putts made, thats not enough over a 72 hole competition? And if the consumer THINKS its better is that not enough to make it worthwhile, wasy to sit back and criticize all day long, NICE JOB!

      Reply

      Dr. Wang

      5 years ago

      Wouldn’t it have been better to try it with a bigger mallet putter if it’s supposed to be more stable for modern heavy putter heads?

      Reply

      Mike Milburn

      4 years ago

      The Bettinardi putter they used weighs 350 grams. That’s the same as my Odyssey O Works 7 mallet. So, even though it was a blade putter it is heavy like mallet.

      Reply

      Oliver Yurface

      4 years ago

      Come on now. That would make too much sense.

      Reply

      Rob McGregor

      5 years ago

      After reading your report there was not enough benefit for me to invest my hard earned cash in the new tech. All power to those that can afford it. However this got me thinking, would a shorter putter shaft make it stiffer and therefore more resistant to flex??
      Thanks for another informative read.

      Reply

      Tim

      5 years ago

      If you have a smooth smooth stroke this shaft may not provide you with much of an improvement. But if you have a quicker, short stroke (like me) you very well see better results. A putter fitting using Quintec proved that this shaft makes me putt more accurately.

      Reply

      Richard

      5 years ago

      It would be interesting to see how much of a difference, if any, the heavier the putter head used to compare for this shaft. I wonder if the lighter the head the less of a difference it makes but for some of those heavy chunky putters out there, I can see a potential advantage.

      Reply

      Pete

      5 years ago

      I don’t worry as much as a lot of people here about my putting. About 75% of my putts are 2 putts with the remainder being 1 putts. I play 3 times a week and very rarely have a 3 putt, maybe once or twice in 12 rounds per month. I’m very happy with my putting. I use the TM Ghost and prefer it over my centre shaft Odyssey!

      Reply

      Frank D.

      5 years ago

      Yeah, but miniature golf doesn’t count, Pete.

      Reply

      Steve

      5 years ago

      Wow, Pete. You are your biggest fan! Impressive.

      Reply

      PeteM

      4 years ago

      Frank and Steve, put your money where your mouth is and come and play at my golf course and we’ll soon see who the loud mouths are and it’s NOT me! Not my problem that you can’t putt to save your lives!

      Nick Aquilino

      4 years ago

      In addition to the condition and structure of the green surface itself, there are three basic things that determine how and where a golf ball rolls after being struck by the golfer toward the hole. Not in any specific order, the first is the direction of the swing path, that the actual line the putter head travels during the execution of a putting stroke relative to a line to the hole. The second is the angle of the club face to the intended line and the third is the location on the face where the ball is struck relative to the precise center of percussion where maximum energy transfer to the ball occurs.
      The swing path is pretty much on the golfer. Technology does not make up for poor putter swing mechanics.. The angle of the face also is a result of swing mechanics but as is proven in the MGS tests described above can also be related to the structure and stability of the golf shaft as the ball is struck. Clearly the STABILITY shaft achieves better results.
      The third is the loss of energy when the ball is not struck at the center of the putter head. Putters developed by Mr. Rife at EVNROLL putters provide a groove structure that compensates for loss of energy away from the center such that anywhere a golf ball is struck on the striking face of an EVNROLL putter the ball travels exactly the same distance to exactly the same place on the green thereby totally eliminating miss hit errors..
      The conclusion is that an EVNROLL putter with a STABILITY shaft eliminates critical potential errors that may occur with conventional putters that do not have this technology. Personally I have been using an EVNROLL putter with a STABILITY shaft for some time and in addition to making more putts, my distance control has improved so three putts are rare.
      The ultimate question is whether the results justify the costs. My customized putter would likely cost upwards of $600. As a long time golfer who has spent many thousands of dollars to play over my lifetime, I see the price to be affordable. It is not likely a putter like I use will pay for it self playing $5 Nassau bets at my local clubs. However, how does one measure the satisfaction sitting down with the guys drinking a beer after a round knowing I shot 76 or 77 instead of 81 that day.. To me it is worth every penny of the cost., particularly when this happens on a regular basis. Obviously there are many golfers who would not feel that way..
      So thank you all at My Golf Spy for the verification that my perception was correct. Yours is a nice service to rely on……..

      Nocklaus

      5 years ago

      And why did you not test Odyssey Stroke Lab shaft that is more popular on tour now ?

      Reply

      KP

      5 years ago

      Had a Scotty. Turfed it. Bought a barely used Yes Sophia for $60 and it has it’s own tech on the face and have lowered my putts per round on average by 4 strokes per round. Will I dump another $250 to get 2 more. No way. I will practice more for those 2. Thanks boys for another great test. Love following MyGolfSpy.

      Reply

      Frank D.

      5 years ago

      As the testing indicated, it is not breakthrough technology. Putter technology is such that if you get a proper fitting- like the SAM Putt Lab, which measures technique, timing, and consistency you can find a putter that will help you improve. But the only real answer to improving after a fitting and a putter, is practice. A stability shaft is the last thing I would turn to for improvement. But that is just my opinion of course.

      Reply

      Bob Pegram

      5 years ago

      It would interesting to see a comparison of the Stability shaft with the UST Frequency Filtered shaft that looks similar.
      Also, I went the other way with a graphite shaft that is LL flex – the softest flex available. It is backweighted with an 80 gram weight from TourLockGolf.com. It works well. Many years ago I used to put well with a soft flex (wood) shaft Otey Crisman putter. I know Rocco Mediate uses an extremely flexible long shafted putter like several others on the senior tour.

      Reply

      Jeff

      5 years ago

      I put in the UST shaft and it appears to have helped my putting a bunch. Making longer puts and more birdies per round.

      Reply

      ChrisK

      5 years ago

      FWIW — it seems to me that almost all golfers, when they either change their grip, change their putter, or change anything at all in their putting game, they almost always do better immediately and then after a few weeks they’re right back where they started. It’s happened to me, and i’ve seen it happen to many of my playing partners. I always wonder about the human element in tests like this. Not that i’m complaining, i think mygolfspy and their testing is awesome.

      Reply

      gunmetal

      5 years ago

      This X 100. I totally get why MGS uses human testers but it never proves anything other than what happened in that day with that group of humans, and that group of humans is subject to do many variables (sleep, food, mood, etc) that can’t be accounted for. I also believe that there is belief bias that subconsciously takes place, which again, nothing they can do with but definitely play a role in the results.

      Reply

      MyGolfSpy

      5 years ago

      1. It’s not a day
      2. Statistical Reliability ;)
      3. As always, show us a bigger and better test

      We’ll be here waiting.

      #THEGolfEquipmentExperts

      Joe

      5 years ago

      Cork grips-salty grips-are even better! Like a fishing rod. I have the smallest one they make on my gamer and some other putters that sit in my office (about size of slim superstroke) and it’s awesome for feel and not squishy. Need a hefty counterbalance weight though since cork is soo light-unless you like the heavy head feel. Hopefully lasts like some of the fishing rod handles I have that are older than I am!

      Reply

      Barry Newman

      5 years ago

      I bought an Odessey Stroke Lab putter with the Stability Shaft last month. My putting appears to be much better on both short and long puts. The biggest improvement has been in less puts pushed to the right. I have a better feel for distance, my misses are just short of the hole rather than two to three feet past. Overall it was $250 well spent.

      Reply

      Sander

      5 years ago

      I 100% agree with Barry. Purchased the Odessey Stroke Lab (seven) a few months ago and not only love the feel of each putt, my game has improved drastically. Overall this gem has allowed me to shave off an average 5 strokes on 18 holes. I am sure there might also be a psychological effect at play as well, but since this new putter has given me renewed confidence, who cares what the cause is? :)

      Reply

      Dave

      4 years ago

      The stroke lab is not a stability shaft unless you bought the stability shaft and had it fit to your stroke lab. Two very different shafts.

      Reply

      RC

      5 years ago

      Imagine what “Calamity Jane” could have done for Bobby Jones if only she would have had a stability shaft installed! Nice test, although I would have liked to see the testers gamer included in the data, to see if there was any PERSONAL improvement compared with the new setup they were testing. For me, putting is more confidence (in yourself AND your equipment), so if you think you can, you know you can. Blaming your equipment when you fail to start the ball on the correct line may not be the answer.

      Reply

      TLGFLA

      5 years ago

      Agreed. Having them compare it to their gamer (especially after getting a chance to use the BGT for a few rounds) would be valuable.

      Reply

      Gregory Santilli

      5 years ago

      I’m running right out, getting one, and putting it in my Scotty Newport, since it really sucks. Or better, in my Ping Anser 2.

      I worked in the industry, and tried Titanium shafts, different steel shafts, lots of different grips. I’ve always been able to putt. This started using a bullseye style putter, soft head, shaft in the middle, steel.

      I’m not really sure either of the above, much less the new putters are an improvement. Hand size is important. I have large hands. So if you go to a larger grip, you are generally putting a giant shock absorber on your putter shaft.
      For some reason, the stock steel shafts have tremendous feel, when combined with a stock, or small grip.
      IIRC, Tiger is still putting with a stock Ping grip, and that’s a great grip, and not really large, but great feel. Leather is even better.
      Friend, Bill Kepler, Kepler’s golf, went so far as to simulate the old school grip, he took a metal saw blade, and wrapped that with leather, and that gave me the best feel ever.

      I get if your Brooks, have giant hands, you want a grip that works for your hand size, even if it takes the feel away. But, he sucks from 10 feet, at 50%…

      Better is not always newer…

      If I can find one cheap, going back to the bullseye…

      Reply

      Nick

      5 years ago

      I have a Stability shaft on my Evnroll ER1. Like Chris above my distance control has been noticeably better. Overall it also seems I do not have to hit the putts as hard for any given distance. Worth the expense for any serious golfer.

      Reply

      MJB

      5 years ago

      Nick,
      Out of curiosity: I’ve asked this question before to people with great knowledge and a highly valued reputation in the business, but I haven’t got any clear answers.

      How do you believe that the technology with the milling of the Evnroll face collaborate with the Stability Shaft? The technology of the face milling, groove depths, wideness of the grooves etc. was R&D using a normal putter steel shaft, with its physical assets/limitations. Have you noticed any differences in using the technology of the face once you’ve changed to the Stability shaft. It would be valuable to get your opinion as a user of them both, as it hasn’t been tested and evaluated by Evnroll themselves. At least not when I e-mailed them and asked.

      Regards,
      MJB-Golf

      Reply

      Tim

      5 years ago

      I kind of see it this way. if you think something is helping you especially when it comes to putting then you’re going to make a more confident stroke. Confidence equals better performance whether it’s off the tee into the green or on the green no question about it. So that being said if you feel the putter shaft helps you then it does … pretty simple!

      Reply

      Reid Thompson

      5 years ago

      This is the best technology to happen to golf help actually lowering strokes in years. It just works.

      Reply

      Joey T

      5 years ago

      Amen. Great tech. The test needs to use their own putter reshafted. I wouldn’t do well with a blade or a answer style putter and I would need a little time to test prior. I use an Evnroll ER8, which I tried and ultimately purchased because of MGS, which has a Stability Shaft in it, and I love it.

      Reply

      AJ76

      4 years ago

      Joey, the ER8 appears to have a single bend shaft? Have you bent the BGT shaft to match the stock shaft or put it on as is? And if bent does it still work well? Cheers!

      Joey T

      4 years ago

      The way the stability shaft works is that it uses your existing shaft\shaft bend and it installs directly into the stability shaft. So it will retain the lie\loft spec you originally had.. They will adjust it to whatever you would like if you do decide to change your specs.

      Reply

      Greg

      5 years ago

      Your testers took 8% fewer putts from 10 feet and in using the Stability shaft and that isn’t improvement? Just from a shaft change! If this was a driver test and a shaft produced that kind of results it would be phenomenal.
      Not just slightly better launch monitor numbers but 14 fewer strokes. Real production. By your strokes gained measurement it would lead to over 1 stroke a round. At my 3 round club championship 3 to 4 fewer strokes is HUGE.
      Give me that $500 driver for 10 more yards but a $200 shaft for more birdies and pars. No thanks.

      Reply

      Kent D

      5 years ago

      Total cost is about $250 if you send in your current putter for them to install it for you. They will measure, and record all your current putter specs, to replicate after the new shaft installation. It takes a few rounds to adjust to. Pros, its rigid and doesn’t vibrates, off center putts are more forgiving. Solid energy transfer, short strokes distance control . Cons, $250 is a lot for some of us, we walk twilight to save a few bucks. For a beginner with $$$ to splurge or avg golfer, they will notice some gains vs a disciplined player who’s had years to learn to putt. They might not notice anything at all. Regardless you still need a lot of practice to get good at anything. I’ve run out of excuses for 3 putts now, lol . Odyssey exo 7 + bgt.

      Reply

      Ben s

      5 years ago

      You guys left off one key factor. A stock shaft is free and the stability shaft is 200 extra and you’ll need to order separately and have someone install it and a new grip so minimal additional cost of close to 250. Unless you’re able to pull a putter grip off (I can and do) to swap shafts. Are you comfortable removing a putter shaft? I will if there’s a hosel but not a bending shaft. I’d be too afraid I didn’t get it aligned correctly.

      I was eyeing these because I’m searching for something to improve my putting aside from practice which I do often.
      These results tell us it’s all between your ears and this shaft and probably the stroke lab are pure marketing hogwash. Bs. No thanks I’ll save the 200. Great test. Thanks guys. You saved me 200!

      Reply

      Mike W.

      5 years ago

      For years, my average putts per round wavered between 33 and 34. About 2 months ago, I purchased a EvnRoll ER9 (10K MOI Extreme) Putter and had a BGT Stability Shaft installed along with EvnRoll’s new Gravity Grip. My average putts per round now wavers between 31 and 32. However, I finished my round yesterday in 28 putts, which is my lowest ever number of putts in a round of golf. Do I love this new putter set-up? You bet I do! Having said that, I must admit, it was a HUGE financial investment.

      Reply

      MhtLion

      5 years ago

      Interesting test! Can you please run a test for Graphite putter shaft as well? That idea is interesting to me compared to another more stiff steel shaft.

      Reply

      ryebread

      5 years ago

      I’m also interested in this. Do we really need a $200 multi-material shaft, or could a really stiff, low torque graphite shaft work just as well?

      I would also be curious about proximity of long lag putts. It might be because I am not that great at golf, but I deal with a lot of 30 foot+ putts. Being able to lag it close (for an inside 2 foot tap in) is as important or more important to my game than making a few more 10 or 20 footers. I would argue for most amateurs avoiding 3 putts is about the easiest way to cut strokes from the round. Dropping in a long putt is just gravy.

      Reply

      Will Dutton

      5 years ago

      I’m also curious about his, I have read in the past that’s some people recommend using a cater 130x shaft.

      really curious if this would provide some of the benefits of the stability shaft but at much less cost

      Bob Smith

      5 years ago

      I have two stability shafts. One in a Miura Blade and the other in a 3D printed putter with 3000 MOI manufactured by Round 4 Competition Putters. I love the feel and responsiveness of the Stability Shaft. I was fitted by Club Championship Gold in their putt lab. I find the Stability Shaft to be excellent in both line and distance control.

      Reply

      Stephen

      5 years ago

      Looks like I’ll have to bag two putters. One for outside of 20′ with the stock shaft, and one for inside 20′ with the stability shaft.

      Reply

      James Warren

      5 years ago

      269 putts compared to 280. Approximately 10 rounds worth of putts for a tour pro. The stability shaft saved an average of one stroke per round. Sounds like a worthwhile investment.

      Reply

      JT

      5 years ago

      I like the way you analyzed the result. If Stability shaft can save an average of one stroke per round. That could potentially equate to 4 strokes per tournament. Putting for “gold” (better PGA tournament finish) would be recognized. It most definitely would be a worthwhile investment

      Reply

      don

      5 years ago

      Now it’s time to test the arm lock. I (like I am sure many others) tried it with an old belly putter but it wasn’t truly better so I dumped it. What a huge mistake that was. I got a chance to try one that actually has the face bent up to match the forward press and I have not looked back. I have missed just 2 putts inside 5′ in the last 2 months. I am a good putter but trust me not that good so it has to be the putter.

      Reply

      Scott

      5 years ago

      BGT is the best thing to happen to putting in years. I’ve had one for a year and would never putt without one again. It’s great for distance control and also for keeping putter on line for short putts. Anyone who wants to be a better putter is crazy if they don’t have one of these installed on their putter.

      Reply

      Alex

      5 years ago

      Great job guys! I was thinking about going with StrokeLab but I understand, also thanks to you I have to say, that fitting is a must. I also have a more general question for you: according to you tests which is, if any, the real disruptive tech that have changed putter performance?

      Reply

      Jon M

      5 years ago

      I feel like this is a test that would HAVE to be done via robot testing given the fractions of inconsistencies in a human putting stroke. A slightly too strong or too weak of a grip can open or close the face. A nearly exact repetition of the putter swing may be more precise.
      Interesting information but the data seems too sensitive to allow for human testing IMHO.

      Reply

      Chris

      5 years ago

      I bought one for my Evnroll ER2 and the thing I love the most is the distance control. On long putts I’m definitely getting a lot more within that 3 foot circle than I did with the old shaft. To me it was definitely worth the money bc I know my putting has improved without doubt

      Reply

      Ollieb

      5 years ago

      I would suggest that the old adage of “its the Indian and not the arrow” may be a factor of consideration in evaluating the potential performance enhancing capabilities of the Stability Shaft. How often is a 20 handicapper going to make a pure stroke with eiither a stock shaft of the stability shaft? It’s probably minuscule. On the other hand a study incorporating highly skilled players with more consistent strokes that yielded improved performance would suggest that the shaft has merits and justification to put it in the bag for a player of any level.

      Reply

      B

      5 years ago

      I have this shaft in 2 different putters and it is extremely stable and in my opinion does what it is supposed to do. Similar to drivers, I think that having better putter shafts will continue to be examined to help one of the least talk ones about areas of the golf game. I would definitely recommend this shaft especially for better players.

      Reply

      Tony Huffman

      5 years ago

      I was not impressed with the results and leaves me staying with my current putter. This is a hard “test” when the constants are less than constant (people instead of machines). I would think the robots like used for drivers may be able to record repeatable results and provide more of an apples to apples comparison. Don’t get me wrong, looking at your test descriptions and the results you have done a very good job with the testing, just my opinion that if there is really a differential comparison between the shafts a robot would be able to capture it and provide more granularity in the numbers.

      Reply

      Mike in Pittsburgh

      4 years ago

      I understand your point, but I am interested in users reactions to the feel of the putter with this shaft as well as the results. It would be nice to have that feedback as well. If it feels like hitting the ball with a board, no thanks. So much of putting is feel, lacking that sort of feedback is a bit curious to me. Did the testers like it?

      Reply

      Devon Carr

      5 years ago

      So the test results were quickly swaying me away from the stability shaft, but during the article I thought of a question. Do you think the results could have partially been based on the fact that the golfers were more used to steal shafts, hence the similar numbers?

      Reply

      Chris

      5 years ago

      Well what I thought was quite interesting was that this test validated the purpose of the stability putter shaft in that the start line and impact location was markedly better than a stock shaft. What was very interesting was that the golfers holed a less putts. Could it be that the testers were not accustomed a better start line and the better impact in their aim and pace?

      Reply

      Joe

      5 years ago

      Chris’ comment nailed it! I have 2 same putters, one with KBS ct tour putter shaft and one with Stability shaft. Im the first to say putting isn’t my strong part, but the stability has helped with strike location and starting it ON PATH. when I say on path I really mean it… so if you have a bad line/target to begin with, you’ll actually more consistently putt right at your aiming point. Also for my stroke I have a tendency to hit low on the putter face b/c I tend to make contact as my putter is coming up. With the Stability I make solid, square contact at least 50% more of the time. Worth $200 and price of a new grip?? Thats up to the individual… For me my HC has dropped 1.5 strokes so id say yes

      Reply

      golfinnut

      5 years ago

      Not a considerable difference to make me run right out for a shaft for a putter. I think putting comes down to technique & the process more than technology anyway. If you can putt, you can putt with anything, whether it’s a piece of bamboo with a shell at the end of it (Gilligans Island reference for all you older folks) or a Scotty Cameron. I really don’t think a different shaft in a putter is going to make you a better putter.

      Reply

      LOGIC

      5 years ago

      Compare what you say to any other profession out there. Anyone who is great at what they do can manage with less than stellar equipment. But, will they be better if they have the best? Yes.

      Think about it.

      Reply

      Curtis Cook

      5 years ago

      I have a BGT shaft in my Ping and let me tell you I could not putt without it,over the last 4 years I have tried every putter and could not make a putt,even when I bought the Ping putter Still same results then I read about BGT and decided why not give it a try WOW!what a difference my fellow golfers could not believe what they were seeing. I was the guy in the scramble they wanted to go 1st so they could see the line ,now I am the guy they want to go last when they need one to go in Try the BGT you will love putting again.

      Reply

      Bob Lawrence

      5 years ago

      I’ve tried these shafts that some of my fellow golfers use; the feel is unique and confidence building. Your test shows it is better for my putting weaknesses. I will be going to this putter shaft as soon as I take the time to get a good putter fitting.

      Reply

      Michael Kullman

      5 years ago

      I currently use the BGT shaft in a Seemore PTM1 and it has really improved my putting greatly. This season I have cut an average of 3 strokes off my round just putting. It is heavier than a regular putter shaft and I think that will help any of you who are handsy like me with the putter. I would definitely recommend trying it before you by it though. Any Club Champion will have this shaft and you can try on it the SAM against your current putter and it will show you if it is improving your putting stroke.

      Reply

      Chris

      5 years ago

      Just got fitted into the Seemore FGP mallet, went for the original as I don’t like the sound of the PTM as much. Since I bought only a $180 putter I splurged on the shaft. I don’t blink an eye at a $250 aftermarket driver shaft so why not give it a whirl. I liked the feel of the shaft but couldn’t try it on the actual putter itself. It’s hard to describe the feel difference but I thought it was promising. Will it make more putts than a stock shaft, maybe maybe not, but I can say I won’t be second guessing my putter anymore.

      I also got a Gravity Grip that I may install but I think that I want to get a baseline for the putter first, putts per round, etc, before I change the grip.

      B.Boston

      5 years ago

      Nice work guys. I think the biggest takeaway was this: Data from across the testing pool yielded little evidence of a universally reliable performance advantage for the Stability Shaft. The “universally reliable” part.

      I’m sure this would be helpful for some golfers, and detrimental to others, just as counterbalancing works great for me, but not for others.

      Go get your putter fit! It’s was well worth it for me, and at the very least, you’ll walk out with a better understanding of your tendencies if your already a good fit. With that said, I was already a decent putter, but some small tweaks to loft lie and adding a counterbalance weight to my existing putter have already shown significant impact to my scores. Last week I have 12 putts on my 9 hole league play, I’ve never come close to that before.

      Reply

      Rob

      5 years ago

      I wonder if you could also compare how just installing an ultra stiff wedge shaft like dynamic gold x7 or C-Taper 130 X into the putters would compare to the stability shaft and stock putter shaft. I’d guess the results would be similar even though those shafts are heavier than the stability shaft.

      Reply

      Gregory Santilli

      5 years ago

      I tried X100’s, and Titanium X shafts in my putter. Decrease in made putts, because of a decrease in feel, for distance, and the softer steel shafts seem to put the ball on line with the older putter styles I use Cameron Newport 2 and Ping Anser 2.
      I find putting these days isn’t a lot of fun anyway. I used to be able to practice after school on bent grass greens, that as they grow out, change in a consistent pattern.
      Multiple blend greens, that are only flat after they have been mowed and rolled, and grow out at different rates, hell, I might as well be putting on an a pinball machine.
      On top of that, the cups are high from people pulling them up all day, because they don’t know how to pull the pin out. Public courses aren’t a lot of fun for putting.

      Reply

      JDShwing

      5 years ago

      I put a C-Taper 130X wedge shaft 2″ tipped into a blade putter – is fantastic. It doesn’t seem boardy or too stiff or lack feel – for me. I have a smooth swinging type of putting stroke. It is an improvement over a stock putter shaft.
      I recommend trying it.
      Also, for me, green reading is the most important thing to making putts. I can putt the ball where I aim, but aiming, well that is tough.

      Reply

      Steve

      5 years ago

      Recently switched to the Odyssey Stroke Lab 7s from a SC. I putt with a slight arc and love the feel on anything inside 20 feet so your stats make sense to me. I haven’t four putted with it yet so I guess it works.

      Reply

      Brian

      5 years ago

      They aren’t the same shaft. They look similar, but BGT stability shaft is very different than the Odyssey Stroke Lab shafts.

      Reply

      Avery

      5 years ago

      I’ve had an O-Works black 7s since it was released and I was considering having it reshafted with a stability shaft. Real glad MGS did this test and I didn’t blow $200. I’ll save a bit more and get a stroke lab exo mini 7s.

      Reply

      Kevin Preston

      5 years ago

      Surprisingly unimpressive test results for a shaft that costs $200. I live in Texas and was seriously considering stopping at BGT’s location in Richardson, TX to get a first hand look and try. Not sure that I will now. Once again would seem the adage you can’t buy a swing applies to BGT’s “revolutionary” putting shaft.

      Reply

      BP

      5 years ago

      I have one in my Scotty Cameron and my results are about the same with the study. I would go and try it if you can. You can get it for cheaper than their MSRP though.

      Reply

      Mike

      5 years ago

      Where can you get it cheaper?

      Kyle

      5 years ago

      Please explain how the stability shaft had lower average putts per hole when the stock shaft made more putts, this makes no sense. Is this test done outside? This must mean that some testers has 3 putts with the stock shaft; several to make up for 11 less made putts.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      5 years ago

      It’s an error in the chart title (we’re swapping now). It should be ‘Total Putts’ as the count reflects the number of putts needed to complete the test. Lower numbers suggest greater putting efficiency, which is what you see in the average putts per hole stat.

      cody reeder

      5 years ago

      Not too surprising. How much do you think a putter shaft can actually do? very little swings.

      Reply

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