How to Make Money Flipping Golf Gear
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How to Make Money Flipping Golf Gear

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How to Make Money Flipping Golf Gear

Welcome back. I hope you enjoyed my piece on building a golf outfit for less than $100 at Ross.

Not only is Ross (and other similar discount stores) a great place to buy golf gear for yourself, it’s also a fantastic resource to help you earn a little extra cash.

Here’s what I mean.

While a lot of the merchandise at Ross can be “trashy” and not worth a second look, if you’re patient you can find some hidden gems that are not only valuable but super easy to flip for a profit.

I’ve spent years buying and flipping (mostly golf) shoes and apparel from Ross, As someone without a lot of discretionary income, this has provided me with a secondary way to make money and, in turn, buy new shoes, new golf clubs, etc. (This method is definitely spouse-approved.)

If you know what you’re looking for it’s relatively risk-free. And, with Ross’s generous return window of 30 days, you can always send the item back if it’s not garnering any interest on various resale markets.

Reselling gear has become rather mainstream as of late. This, along with the explosion of social media personalities that do this for a living, has made it more difficult to find resell-worthy stuff before the scalpers get it.

That said, with a little practice and a lot of patience, you should be able to find a system that works for you and pull in a little extra income.

Tips and Tricks for Flipping Golf Gear at Ross

I’ve learned a lot over the past four years or so. I’ve learned a lot of what works but, more importantly, what doesn’t work.

While buying and flipping golf apparel, accessories and shoes at Ross is a relatively low-scale operation, it still stings to get burnt and lose $20 or $30. My goal is to ensure that doesn’t happen to you.

Even still, it can (and more than likely will) happen once or twice. Keep in mind that my advice here is not a replacement for your own judgment nor the advice of your financial advisor. I’m just sharing my own personal experiences in the hopes that you can find a fun (and lucrative) hobby.

Tip #1: Golf Shoes Are Cash Cows

The majority of my successful Ross flips have been golf shoes. Why? They’re so darn cheap.

Ross generally lists all golf shoes (regardless of style, color and size) in the $25-$35 price range. With a lot of pairs, this means you’re looking at nearly and instant 2x or 3x profit.

Take, for example, the Air Max 1 G. This two-year old golf shoe was just $30 at Ross when I scooped up a few pairs to sell. Within weeks, I was able to sell them on Mercari for around $60 each. After fees, this netted me about $20-25 per pair. Heck, if I’d held on to them instead of selling them quickly, I’d be looking at over $100 per pair, based on recent eBay sales.

The profit seems fairly small, sure, but it can add up over time.

Most every golf shoe I’ve found at Ross, I’ve been able to flip for nearly double what I paid. The only case I can remember of breaking even was a pair of the NIKE Air Zoom Victory Tour 2 shoes. These were in a small size (8.5M) so they just weren’t fast movers at all.

This brings me to another point: Size matters.

Tip #2: Size Matters

When talking size, I’m mostly referring to shoes. The size of a shoe matters nearly as much (if not more) than the price.

For example, the size 13+ section is always chock-full of great golf shoes, Jordan and NIKE galore. The same can be said about the tiny sizes (5-7M). That said, there’s a reason you’ll often see limited or rare styles in this section: they don’t sell.

If NIKE couldn’t get rid of them on their own site, there’s no reason to think they’ll sell for you on eBay.

Stick with average sizes, meaning 9-12 in men’s shoes and 6-9 in women’s. Outside of this, you’re taking a bigger risk incurring the cost of the shoes with a lesser chance of actually flipping for a profit.

Hint: Check the large youth sizes, too. A 6Y equates to a 7.5W. Just make sure you list the shoe as both to capture both audiences.

Tip #3: Apparel is Tricky

In general, I tend to focus more on golf shoes instead of golf apparel. In my experience, Ross is great for buying golf apparel for personal use. It is, however, much trickier to make money on golf apparel for your own gain.

The one caveat here (and this applies to most every category) is limited stuff. If an apparel item you find at Ross is sold out everywhere online, there’s a better chance you can make a couple of bucks.

Tip #4: Restocks

When does Ross put out new stock? There’s not really one great answer. And the internet isn’t very convinced one way or another. The consensus seems to be, though, that they don’t put out new stock on weekends.

In my experience, shopping on weekdays is generally more fruitful than weekends. Fewer people to deal with, less picked through. If you’ve got the time to get to Ross right when they open, this will up your chances of finding a hidden gem.

Even still, I’ve made plenty of Ross runs after work on a Friday (don’t tell my boss) and come away with great gear.

Tip #5: Listing Matters

How (and where) you list your Ross finds matters. Here are a few of the sites I use the most when reselling gear, in order of my preference.

  • eBay. The Holy Grail of the secondhand market.
  • Mercari. Great for shoes and clothing; not so great for clubs and accessories.
  • Facebook Marketplace. Solid choice if you want cash (and live in a well-populated area).
  • Poshmark. Great for clothes but haven’t had as much luck with shoes.

Each of these online platforms are extremely user-friendly. That said, I do have a few tips to help you create a listing that people will want to click.

  1. Ensure your listing is accurate. Finding out the real style name, actual colors and correct size is key to creating an accurate listing.
  2. Asses the condition. Most Ross shoe finds should be listed as “New without box” or some similar condition (the language can vary from platform to platform).
  3. Take good photos. Make sure your lighting is good and that the item can be seen from all angles. The more photos, the better as this allows the potential buyer to know exactly what condition the item is in.
  4. Determine shipping. Most often, I make the buyer pay for shipping (helps with profit margins). That said, offering free or discounted shipping may entice someone to pull the trigger on your listing.

Tip #5: The Price is Right

Perhaps the most crucial bit of flipping gear is the pricing. You must nail this aspect to ensure your item sells and you turn a profit. The balance is often hard to find. Price too high and you’ll be left with an overstock of goods with no potential buyers. Price too low and you’re leaving “meat on the bones.”

Because I’m well versed in this whole reselling thing, I rely only on my intuition to price items and determine what will move quickly. That said, there are a few things you should do with any item you intend to sell.

The first thing I would do is go to eBay and find recently sold listings of the same item you’re looking to sell. This will give you an idea of what buyers are willing to pay for something. In most cases, if there’s a little wiggle room on the profit margins, I’ll try and undercut what other people are selling by $5 or $10. This way, I’m still making money, the product moves more quickly and the buyer is getting a great deal.

I know there are applications to scan barcodes and figure out similar information but I haven’t used any so I don’t want to lead you astray.

In any case, go with your gut. Often there aren’t many “sold” listings to base your pricing off of. Here you have a chance to set the market.

Have Fun

The thrill of the chase is perhaps the best part of flipping golf gear.

The highs of finding that hidden gem are well worth the few hours spent at the store. And, hopefully, with a little work (and perhaps some luck), you can turn this little side hustle into a new set of irons or that Cameron putter you’re dreaming of.

For You

For You

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Connor Lindeman

Connor Lindeman

Connor Lindeman

Connor is MyGolfSpy's resident sneakerhead who believes that golf is more enjoyable with a fresh pair of kicks. When he isn't scrolling Twitter to find his next golf shoe purchase, you can find him at the piano or trying a new dessert place with his wife. #Lefty

Connor Lindeman

Connor Lindeman

Connor Lindeman

Connor Lindeman

Connor Lindeman

Connor Lindeman

Connor Lindeman

Connor Lindeman





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      MT

      4 months ago

      Holy God…does the scalping never stop? Are you the guy selling the Kirkland irons on there for $1000+? Just get a real job man.

      Reply

      Connor Lindeman

      4 months ago

      Hey brother! Writing about golf is my job. I do agree, the scalping is quite annoying. However, I feel like selling golf shoes for a few extra bucks is a worthwhile way to make some extra cash. Cheers!

      Reply

      steve s

      4 months ago

      Sideline Swap is a relatively new sports focused selling site. Fees are reasonable and it’s pretty easy to use. Not a lot of traffic, yet, but it’s growing. I’ve sold a couple things there with a better return to me than ebay.

      Reply

      bob

      4 months ago

      I tried Sideline Swap for the first time last month. I had some really nice, barely used Wilson Staff V6 irons but they are left handed. Tried Facebook Marketplace with no luck, sold through Sideline Swap after about 2 weeks. They make the shipping easy too.

      Reply

      Jason S

      4 months ago

      I’m always looking for alternatives to eBay for selling my used golf equipment. By my calculations, the fees equal about 13% of the sale price+tax+shipping. Looking at the Sideline Swap, their fees at 12% + 2.9% (processing fee) for the first 5 items, then 10% + 2.9%. So it’s not really worth it to change from eBay, especially for those first 5 items. It’s possible those fees only apply to the price and not taxes & shipping costs, but it’s still not a great deal less than eBay for a smaller audience.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      EBay is terrible for cheaper gear, because of the excessive FEES placed on golf clubs, JUST BECAUSE they’re golf clubs, that EBay puts on them. So everybody ends up calculating that amount on top of the actual used value, is why you see so many inflated prices because the seller knows he will be hit with fees.
      It’s not worth selling a cheap used club one at a time here and there on EBay, nor should you buy anything unless it’s close to the stated PGA Value guide for the actual worth. Which is why you hardly find any really good deals as everything is overpriced. You’d have to negotiate with the seller, by letting the seller know that you are looking at the PGA Value guide and that you know the real price

      Reply

      Mike

      4 months ago

      I’ve bought (but mostly sold) many clubs on eBay & yes, the fees have gotten ridiculous (especially if you want to “promote” your listing). However, if you’re patient, you still can find a good deal (as I have on numerous occasions). But that might mean waiting a few months and generally that isn’t acceptable. And lately it seems, the “good deals” have become much more rare.

      Regarding this column, sounds as if you’re going to run around a whole lot to make a few bucks selling things online. As someone who has sold a ton of stuff on eBay, it might not be worth the effort.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      When the PGA Value Guide says an item is, say, $60, yet people are pricing the thing at DOUBLE that on EBay, it’s just pure greed and stupidity, and people who buy those are not helping anybody because even the prices would never come down.
      So you add the fees to that $60 and then may be being reasonable and adding 10% for one’s own profit, I’d understand, but to make it double or even more, is downright stupid, you’re all just ripping each other off.
      It’s a used club, been some time, and there are brand new ones out there on the shelves, so people should quit pricing everything as if they run a high end used retail shop.
      Unless it’s a special one-off or a numbered edition or whatever why are people selling general off-the-shelf items at double their value is ridiculous.
      Quit buying them, people!

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