Ready Golf – The New Norm?
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Ready Golf – The New Norm?

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Ready Golf – The New Norm?

Everyone has heard of “ready golf” but how many of us actually know what it is and practice it? You may think you do but do you, really?

Understanding Ready Golf

Ready golf is a departure from traditional golf in the sense that it is more flexible and more efficient. It’s about speeding up the game in an organized, logical and safe fashion.

Key Principles

Play When Ready: Rather than playing the traditional “who’s away” (the player furthest from the hole goes first), ready golf encourages players to proceed with their shot as soon as they are prepared and their fellow players are aware they are doing so.

Advance To Your Ball: If you are able to safely move to your ball without interfering or interrupting your playing partners, do so.  Start visualizing your next shot and be ready when you arrive at your ball.  

Keep Pace Of Play: Keep up with the group in front of you. You want to be courteous and allow them to play at normal speed but remain just behind them. If you are finding yourself falling behind, pick up your ball after double par and move to the next tee.

Keeping Pace

Ideally, a round of 18 holes should take four hours or less. Unfortunately, five- to six-hour rounds are all too common and, in an age where time is precious, a couple of extra hours on the course may not be doable. Extended wait times between shots not only disrupt pace of play but lead to many being frustrated and on the verge of leaving this game. One of the primary reasons for ready golf is to promote a more enjoyable experience for all.

Ready Golf Without Leaving The Traditions

Ready golf is not about reckless or inconsiderate course behavior. It’s not about running through the group ahead. Quite the opposite, actually. You must still respect your fellow players, the course and the Rules of Golf. You still need to rake the bunkers and repair divots and ball marks. Ready golf simply encourages players to practice common sense while looking for ways to speed up the pace of play.

How To Make Ready Golf Successful

Stay Prepared: Anticipating your next shot, taking your practice swings and going through your pre-shot routine while your fellow players are taking their turns will speed up the game.

Limit Distractions: Taking shots with the cart girl and talking on the green before heading to the cart shouldn’t happen. Order your beer on the next tee, not in the middle of the fairway.

Communicate: Tell your fellow players what your intentions are and ensure they will cooperate. It’s absolutely necessary to keep everyone safe.

Keep Up With The Group Ahead: This is the big one! Maintaining the pace of play means that you aren’t falling behind the group ahead. Don’t be the group that is three holes behind. At some courses, the player assistant (ranger or marshal) will ask your group to pick up your balls and skip a couple of holes to get back into position. If you find yourself in this situation, reassess your play or make sure allow faster groups to play through.

Where Do We Head From Here?

All golfers were beginners at some point so we understand that you may have just started learning the game and that’s why you whiffed or that it took you three swings to get out of a bunker. We definitely aren’t upset that you are repairing your divot or ball mark. In fact, we are thrilled that more people are playing a game that so many of us love. We are happy to see you teaching your kids to play. However, we are concerned that it’s taking longer than ever to play 18 holes. Do your part and play ready golf!

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      J

      1 month ago

      In my humble opinion,
      my experience is that groups that play in order and know whose turn it is play faster than groups that play “ready”.
      When groups play “ready” there’s always a confusion about who will go next, especially when putting.
      Guys just stand around looking at each other until someone decides that they’ll go.
      Besides, on the weekends, it’s always hurry up and wait on the next tee box.
      We should be willing to take a breath and enjoy the day, not race through like its some awful thing we’re “stuck” on the golf course on a beautiful day.
      It’s incredibly frustrating to feel that the group behind is pressuring you to putt out faster when your group is about to wait on the next tee box.
      Relax, talk to your playing partners, play in turn.

      Reply

      Trusty Rusty

      1 month ago

      I am all for ready golf. But If a course is going to be packed, a full tee sheet on a sunny or difficult play day. They should move the tee markers up a bit and place the hole in the most easily accessible portion of the green for the lower <10 handicap holes and all par 3s. This alone will knock 20 minutes off the time easily and will keep things moving.

      If your golf course allows for any round to be played in more than 4:15. whether they have rangers or not, or walking versus riding……..Your course pro, director of golf or owner does not give a crap, no matter what they say.

      Marshals should be given side arms.

      Reply

      Trusty Rusty

      1 month ago

      what I want to know, who taught people to play slow? If you shot 90 and had a stop watch for ever shot, practice swing, club selection, waggle, 14 second putting stoke like tiger of course etc. The elapsed time would be well under 12 minutes so ask yourself what are you doing for the other 4.5 hours?

      Reply

      Thomas

      2 months ago

      On the subject of ready golf is a great I try to play that format all the time and if I am playing with a group I am not a part of (as a walking I always suggest the format. But some times it’s the courses fault. There are two courses in Colorado that I don’t play any more. They are both 7400 long and they always allow high handicappers to play from the tips, now these are not east tracks. To make matters worst Marshall’s don’t enforce the pace of play. Although I loved playing the two in question, I don’t anymore. Why? the last time it took 6 hrs. ana17 min.

      Reply

      The Duck

      2 months ago

      Great view.
      I played today, Autumn here in Australia. Our group of 3, one in cart two of us walking. We do spray, so generally don’t have the 3 of us in the fairway at any one time. Group ahead of us today, two in a cart, SO SLOW! On the Tee, mucked around multiple times with ball/tee placement, then drove from one side to the other. On the greens, lined up from a 360 degree view every single green.
      Once one had played their tee shot, the other then decided to get their club out, then mucked around like the other did.
      Ready Golf is a brilliant thing, if the players utilise it.
      I think it is up the Clubs to push it, maybe have the Captain play a few holes with each group over a few weeks to ensure that Players are doing the right thing.

      Reply

      David Terrie

      2 months ago

      I grew up playing ready golf. Best way to play. We’d often play 36.

      Reply

      Michael

      2 months ago

      I was raised to play “ready” by my Dad. He would not tolerate slow play by me, our group, or even groups in front of us. On a crowded course, it’s just the right thing to do (or try to do!). A bad scenario for me; one round my son and I were riding and were paired with a H/W team of walkers. Not only did they walk, but their pre-shot routines were painfully slow (hit the ball already, Sergio!). We were scolded by the Ranger a couple of times, but it really was the issue of pairing walkers with riders.

      Reply

      Craig Brown

      2 months ago

      I love how many players think walkers slow overall pace of pay. I walk when/where ever possible. My friends and I are always waiting for the “cart” groups…probably why we are viewed as “slow”. The courses, in my not-so humble opinion, with the slowest play are “cart required”.

      Reply

      cksurfdude

      2 months ago

      AGREED!! 100%!!

      Reply

      KP

      2 months ago

      Absolutely! There are many courses in the area with a long way between holes, and aren’t real “walker friendly”, but even on those courses, there are always walkers that absolutely have a quicker pace of play that most players in carts. Granted, the main factor is the experience of the golfer, but to automatically put walkers in the slow category is incorrect.

      Reply

      mkav

      2 months ago

      Well, it’s all been said. I just want to reiterate two things:
      1. those in carts…drop your rider off, go to your ball. or you get out and let partner go to their ball.
      2. there should NEVER be 4 people standing around on the green. someone has got to be in the act of putting.
      my group plays in 3.5 hours, walking. most of us are mid-handicappers. just be aware and ready. we’re all 65+ yo.

      Reply

      tdroma98

      2 months ago

      Great Article! Learning to play “Ready Golf” is a must! You’re not disrespecting the game nor your playing partners. The course I play & work at is rated for a 4-hour play.  I play with the same 4 to 6 gents 3 or 4 mornings a week, we all are walking, no riding. We generally play as a 4-some, some days we do play as a 5-some (with Pro Shops approval) and we are always the first or 2nd group of the day to tee off. We set the pace. As a 5-some, we generally play in 3 hrs & 20 mins and in 3 hrs as a 4-some. We don’t run, we all watch others’ tee shots, and we help find our playing partners’ errant shots. We walk around the shorter hitters’ drives, to get to the longer hitters’ drives. Boom, we are ready to play our next shot. We chat on the tee box & while walking down the fairways. People at the club are amazed we consistently play at around the 3 hr mark (3- 4 ages are in their mid 70’s & 2 of us in our 60’s). During my Ranger duties, I watch the Weekend Warriors; first, they play the incorrect tees;
      they feel the need to drive to each other’s golf balls;
      they are not ready to hit their own shots;
      The Warriors all want to play the tips; comments are: oh it’s only 6,000 or 6,200 yds and they struggle.
      Many golfers enjoy emulating their favorite PGA Tour Player, especially on the green. You know mark your ball, walk down your line & around the cup, check out every angle, squat behind your ball mark, place your ball down carefully to line the ball up properly, then step back behind the ball, take 4- 5 practice strokes, walk to the side of the ball, take two more practice shots, place your putter behind the ball, another look or 2 at the hole, then putt the ball, which comes up about 3 feet short. Then repeat the steps for the tap-in. Phew, that was tiring :). Great article! Play Ready Golf. Be aware of your Pace of Play!

      Reply

      cksurfdude

      2 months ago

      Hear Hear!! 👍

      Reply

      Marc A

      2 months ago

      when you get to your ball, HIT IT if other players are on other side of fairway!!!! i find this to be the biggest reason for slow play

      Reply

      5TimeChamp

      2 months ago

      Because of my schedule, I tend to hop on with a threesome or twosome, and I don’t know who I will be playing with. Kind of nice meet new people. Tournaments too.
      However, what do you do when one or two of your new friends are slower than a herd of tortoises stampeding through peanut butter? Happened to me in a state tournament: two of the players were outrageously slow on the tee, and we also had a few searches for my new playing partners balls. An official confronted us four holes from the end, saying we were behind which we were, and he was going to monitor our speed for the next two holes. I have worked hard to limit my shot to be in the air in way less than 40 seconds, I rarely take a practice swing, but what do you do? What do you say to your partners? Confronting playing partners is not my thing. I ended up hurrying and doubled 2 holes in a row. I’m ready to play when it’s my turn. I tend to rush when I am playing out of turn. Can’t we just be ready when away?

      Reply

      Blake

      2 months ago

      I very much identify with this, I generally go out as a single and have a low-ish handicap and find that often the group I’m in has at least one or two folks who are not able to keep up. The unfortunate reality is that this is more common at munis and courses that are more accessible/affordable and these courses are unlikely to have marshals or any kind of enforcement (at least in my area). I also find that often (though not always) the folks who are the slowest are also the most likely to “overindulge” or be the most reactive so it doesn’t seem like a great idea to confront them one on one most of the time. It’s a catch-22 situation for golf courses because these are the most likely folks to leave negative Google reviews about “rude staff” and I doubt they want to deal with riled up, frustrated drunks any more than the rest of us.

      I try to play at nicer courses whenever I can because they seem to be the only ones that have a bit more of a handle on this, but that’s a poor solution for this issue and one that is not feasible for most of us most of the time. The only real solution I can think of would be if more public access golf courses were able to keep track of problematic behavior/players, require new players to complete some kind of basic skills course, or otherwise make course access contingent upon some basic standards of competency and behavior. I believe that’s somewhat of a thing in Great Britain but I can’t imagine it would work here, unfortunately.

      Reply

      Tom

      2 months ago

      Agreed on all the comments on speeding up play. Especially on weekends I have found a big issue is the spacing of tee times and the lack of a starter making sure groups go off according to their tee time. As soon as the group in front is clear the next group is given the OK to hit their tee shot. Assuming a par 4 that means we are basically waiting on the first hole to hit our approach into the green. So we are backed up on the first hole and it likely will continue the balance of the round.

      Reply

      WBN

      2 months ago

      I live in a tourist town and in the summer the courses are packed. Rangers (marshalls) ride around and don’t say anything to groups that fall behind. They are usually volunteers that “work” for free golf. They ride around and look busy while staying out of sight of the pro shop. Doing their job correctly would definitely help.

      Reply

      Longandwrong

      2 months ago

      How much time is spent sitting in a cart waiting for cart partner to hit a ball? Full course single rider golf rental carts, bikes, choppers, and boards will speed up pace of play more than anything else. Private carts must only have one person in them. Each single rider cart finds ball, hits ball and repeats.

      Reply

      cksurfdude

      2 months ago

      In many countries in Europe you have to be qualified to be able to go out on the course. During busy periods here we need to do some basic ability checks and etiquette expectations. This is NOT to exclude new golfers – just quickly educate them on how to keep moving around the course on a busy day.

      My unpopular opinions include… * Get rid of the beverage cart. (yeah yeah course revenue blah blah – charge everyone $5 more green fee ) * If you hit a ball OB go directly to that spot and drop a new ball. * Put a shot clock on the putting greens. * Pick up after 3 putts, and just call it 3 if you like. * Play your own ball – no cart “committees”. * If you’re on the back tee and don’t hit it past the front tee – pick up and drop by the best drive in the group. * More courses should rent push carts. * Park the motor cart on the back side of the green towards the next tee. * After you putt out move to the next tee – clean your clubs, converse with your playing partners, figure out scores, etc etc there – not in the way of the next group coming up behind you. .. and .. * If you’re ready to putt – putt.

      It’s not Sunday afternoon at Augusta and you .. nor I .. are in that final group.
      ….

      Reply

      Blake

      2 months ago

      Couldn’t agree more about the European model and getting rid of the beverage cart. If you want to sell alcohol on the course it should be at a dedicated halfway house and they should actually enforce drink limits like at a bar. I don’t know how these people make it home in one piece. You’d also get rid of a large percentage of serial offenders – the folks who are “only here for the beer” with the actual golf being more of an afterthought. That being said, there seems to be huge pressure on golf courses in the US to not turn away any paying customer and making up for alcohol sales would require greens fee hikes way more than a $5 increase. I’m not an insider and don’t have any numbers but I wouldn’t be surprised if it was more like $25-50 especially in the summer, which would turn off a lot of folks.

      Reply

      Al

      2 months ago

      Should twosomes get priority to play through foursomes?

      Reply

      JBR

      2 months ago

      We were in Scotland last year and overhead some Americans talking about how much money the course could make if it had more than 5 or 6 powered carts (buggies). Their calculation started with ” OK, two carts per group, 5 hours per round…”
      There’s the issue right there. Thinking carts are faster and that a 5 hour round is normal.
      UK and Ireland expect a four ball to get round in 4 hrs max, walking. No beverage cart, no marshals, just walk straight to your ball and play.
      It’s not hard. Keep it simple and have the correct frame of mind.

      Reply

      cksurfdude

      2 months ago

      Love it. Play golf!

      Reply

      Blake

      2 months ago

      ☝️ This

      Reply

      Freddy Mercury

      2 months ago

      Cut the rough low enough to where you can see the ball from a distance. Minutes looking for a ball a dozen times a round per group creates slow play. Or take the pro tip and hit it in the FW.

      Reply

      Al

      2 months ago

      Playing through solves the problem for you, but it takes time. The slow group stops altogether while you go through, which just allows the next group to catch the slowpokes.

      And while keeping up with the group ahead means you will always be in position, do you REALLY think you should be expected to keep up with that first-of-the-day group that plays 18 under 3 hours? If you are a hole behind that group but still on-track for a 3.5 hour round, will you get pissed if a ranger tells you to pick it up to close the gap withthe group ahead?

      The fairest enforcement method is allowing a maximum allowable time to play the round, say 4.25 hours. Any group behind that pace, with open course ahead, should get pushed via a ranger or GPS.

      Alternatively, if a group is on pace to complete their round under that 4.25 hours, and the group behind them whines about waiting on every shot, too bad for the group behind. As an aside, the whiners are often a twosome who cannot understand they are on a course full of foursomes and they’re gonna wait.

      Reply

      Tom Grace

      2 months ago

      1000% correct if group is on pace keeping up with the fastest group on the course is bull!! Some players shoot 110 some players shoot in the low 80s or high 70s but all should be allowed to play that shot in an allotted amount of time per shot not being expected to complete 6-7 shots in the same amount of time someone else is completing only 4-5 shots. By the way I got to a 8 h handicap my first year of playing for 2 reasons I practiced twice as much as I played and I didnt let groups or people bully me into the theory of keeping up with the group ahead of you. I took the time to execute the shot I needed to, to keep my confidence up and scores down as I progressed in the game. Still shouldn’t take 5 hrs though!! But 4-4.5 is reasonable depending on difficulty of course. Chill out play the game, get to know a little bout the players ur playing with and HAVE SOME FUN!!!

      Reply

      Donn Lost in San Diego

      2 months ago

      Here is a solution, but not gonna happen:

      LEARN HOW TO CADDY. Once you learn the ropes, then Ready Golf done right.

      Keep you eye on the worst player in your group so that person knows you are paying attention to where his/her ball goes.

      Reply

      Lefthack

      2 months ago

      I play ready golf. I don’t take practice swings, I don’t stand over the ball for 20 seconds thinking about my shit. It is 3 seconds, 5 max before I hit my shot. There was a great story about taking more than 5 seconds to shoot and how it gets worse the longer you take.

      But this is also why I try to be first out so nobody is in front of me. I can knock out 9 holes playing 3 balls in under 90 minutes and still be first in the office.

      Reply

      RC

      2 months ago

      We play in 3:15 or so on weekdays, but to me it’s much more important to be aware of the group BEHIND you than it is to try to keep up with the group in front of you. Our front runners sometimes play with a “2” in front of their time, as in 2:50! They sometimes hit at the same time, pick up 3 footers, etc., so us trying to keep up with them is silly. The key is, if you look back and see a group getting close when you’re on the green, it is not that necessary to stand there and watch everybody in your group putt out. We have that understanding, so there are no “hurt feelings” for walking away after you putt out – (it’s rude if you don’t have that understanding up front) – go tee off!

      If you’re sharing a cart, either drop one player at their ball, or if the balls are close, park in the middle and go to your ball. NEVER look away from a bad shot while you fume – keep your eye on it and pick out a marker like “the third tree” so you’ll know where to look. Don’t try the hero shot – you’ll score better if you make sure your next shot will at least get you a clear shot after that. It feels great pulling off the rare hero shot, but the odds are against you and it’ll add more shots which loses more time. And we drink AFTER a round – I know that is impossible for some of you, but whatever.

      Reply

      mongo312

      2 months ago

      Outlaw aimpoint. It slows down PGA play and they know what they’re doing.

      Reply

      cksurfdude

      2 months ago

      Disagree. I use Aim point and it helps me decide on a target line very quickly. Also – what the pros do on the greens is NOT what recreational players should do .. here I agree they take way way too much time with their putting.

      Reply

      Gene hsiao

      2 months ago

      If you Aimpoint while the other people on the green are doing their own assessments, it doesn’t add time. I actually shortens time, b/c you rarely 3 putt

      Reply

      Bill ward.

      2 months ago

      Just played this morning. We were 2nd group off. Three of us. We all walked. I’m 53 playing partners 65 and 72. Finished in 340 at a relaxed pace. Group in front of us ended up about 2.5 holes ahead so they probably played in 3 hours. A foursome. Group behind was 3 holes behind. So the first 2 groups played in less than 4 hours and the rest of the day is screwed because of the slow third group. Happens fast.

      Reply

      GHINTen

      2 months ago

      This is true, Midwest Golfer, but a MAJOR issue I have with private and public courses alike is that bev cart staff are not trained AT ALL in how to navigate to the most ideal position to service a group. Of the ideas out here, this should be a very fixable solution with better training and the courses are fully responsible (controllable, unlike some of the random behavior we all see out there hurting pace of play)

      Reply

      DY438

      2 months ago

      As a Ranger & starter at an excellent two course facility… turn down the music, pay attention to the groups ahead/ behind you, shut your phone off & put it in your bag! Even if you use it for yardages/ scoring, be ready to play! Thanks for the article, it will help all of us to play a more enjoyable round!

      Reply

      EasyPutter

      2 months ago

      I work with Veteran golfers and lots of new ones to golf too. One in particular bristled at the idea he could not take as long as he wanted to for every shot including putting, wanted each person in the foursome to take their turn unhurried, pace of play double what it should be. I was there on his first round and it got back to me he did no like how I was “always rushing” him. I now preface most rounds with new (to me) players with a comment about pace of play and ready golf to set expectations.

      Reply

      Ray Lizzio

      2 months ago

      and stop pulling the pin, you don’t putt like a pro and the rule was changed for a reason !!!!

      Reply

      Dan

      2 months ago

      Covid?

      Reply

      rkj427

      2 months ago

      When I am out with my regular playing partners, we forego the “honors for the tee” and if you are ready, then you go.
      Typically play out to in once off the tee, more so for safety reasons than anything else.
      Biggest issue I see are players who are not the longest hitters waiting to hit second shots into greens when the distance to the green is farther than the tee shot they hit.
      Courses do not help by booking tee times so close together, and newer players need to understand that picking up after a “double par” score would also speed up the pace of play.

      Reply

      alii

      2 months ago

      Why do so many of the golfers in carts feel the need to “play by committee”? Driving to each ball, everyone getting out of the carts, discussing the shot, then eventually that player will play. Then they go to the next ball and it starts all over again . Further, why do people in carts drive around like shriners at a parade? Go to the ball! I can’t tell you how many times I, a dedicated walker, have nearly hit into people who drive to a ball down the fairway, or more often in the woods, then leave that position and drive back towards the tee box. Why didn’t you take care of that ball first? It is my opinion that the carts slow down play. Golf was designed as a walking sport, it is not a sport when you ride in the little carts! If you are really old or infirm, you are welcome to them. But, most of the people I see riding are half my age, it is embarrassing. People who do ride refuse to get out and walk to their ball not 10 yards away. They take forever to get in or out of the cart. They spend more time talking than playing. If you want to socialize go to the club house. If the people ahead of me are moving quickly I can walk 18 holes in well under 3 hours, why can’t the guys in carts go faster than me? If you can’t, why not let me play through? At my home club people are usually courteous and let me play through, but at other courses cart riders will almost never let walkers through. Why? Most of the people I regularly play with play ready golf. We excel at moving quickly and not holding up people behind us. I let the really fast guys play through, especially on the days that I am stinking it up. BTW if you are having “one of those days” just hit the ball and don’t waste time simply hitting it in the woods each time doesn’t take 15 practice swings. I think we would all appreciate a faster pace of play.

      Reply

      donn

      2 months ago

      Yuk. Glad I don’t see that committee thing in San Diego. The golfers here are mostly awake to reality.

      Reply

      Leeman

      2 months ago

      I often play solo, first tee-time of the day and I ride in a cart, use a GPS and I MOVE quickly. I typically finish a round in under 2 hours, shooting in the mid 70’s. I can’t stomach slow play. I joined a semi-private course so I can avoid playing on weekends. Nothing more sickening than a 5 or 6 hour round of golf. I need to keep moving. When I’m playing with others I’m very aware of our group’s standing on the course. Are we keeping up with the group ahead? If I see us lagging behind, I’ll vocalize a friendly reminder to everyone that we need to pick up our pace. I don’t care if you’re scratch or you can’t break 120, there’s no excuse to play slowly.

      Reply

      cksurfdude

      2 months ago

      YES!!! Thank you. Also like walking .. and also an forced to stand around in amazement at the spectacle of two carts going back and forth, back and forth .. and NO GOLF BALLS ARE BEING HIT……..

      Reply

      Dr Tee

      2 months ago

      I’m all for ready golf, but on the tee and in the fairway there may be safety issues–for example if I am playing from a more forward tee than a slower player in my group, and I am ready, I am now in the “line of fire” of my slower compadre behind me. The same is true if I am forward of one or more slower players and I am ready in the fairway.
      “Danger Will Robinson”–I have seen players hit and seriously injured by errant balls and I don’t want to be one!

      Reply

      Mark R

      2 months ago

      Hey fellow golfers – don’t be the a-hole slow player. And if you have a slow player(s) in your group holding up the show, do something about it. Pace of play is EVERYONE in the group’s responsibility.

      #2 Play the correct tee boxes. If you can’t break 100, play red. And if you don’t break 80 regularly, play white. Yeah, I know you were a stud in high school 20 yrs ago – I get it – but your not good at golf. Play the correct tee box.

      Best way to deal with a slow player in your group – find a replacement. He’s out.

      Too many 15 handicappers spending 2 mins lining up thier 4th putt.

      Some courses do a great job with having rangers expedite the pace of play. I am 100% courses enforcing pace of play.

      Reply

      I miss, I miss, I make

      2 months ago

      For many, especially newer golfers, golf has gone from a “sport” to a social occasion. The actual game has gone from the reason to be on the course to almost a distraction. I appreciate that these people are there to have fun. But as we all know their “fun” becomes our spoiled round of golf. If a course has a marshal that person should be able to spot potential slow groups and perhaps lend a few tips on pace of play. The “carrot” works better than the “stick’ but must be given before the situation becomes a real problem.

      Reply

      Rich

      2 months ago

      If you play in a twosome without anyone in front of you, and it takes you more than 3 – 3 1/2 hours, you’re the problem. If you search for your ball for over 3-4 minutes, you’re the problem, if you take 3 practice swings, you’re the problem. If you wait for par 5s to clear for your second shot and you make that shot one in 10, you’re the problem.
      Every time anyone causes a delay on the course, it delays everyone behind them over and over and over. Double par before you pick up? I can’t imagine being behind a foursome taking 10 shots each on a par 5. Thats 30 minutes plus in itself. Sadly golf courses won’t spread tee times because it affects their revenue. It’s crazy to me that any group doesn’t play ready golf. There will always be a player having a bad day or who’s just learning. If he/she is off the green while the others are on, and thins it across the green, and everyone else waits for them to get another club and walk across to hit their next shot, and you think that’s “just golf”, you’re definitely the problem.

      Reply

      Leonard

      2 months ago

      Pace of play starts from using the proper tee box. USGA guidelines suggest playing at the tees from which we can make the green in regulation. So much of the pace is determined by players teeing off too far back. Also at too many courses the management is timid about talking to players about their pace. That makes no sense as pace of play is always cited as golfers’ number one complaint.

      Reply

      I miss, I miss, I make

      2 months ago

      Bingo!

      Reply

      Morse

      2 months ago

      Agree 100%.

      Reply

      Stainless

      2 months ago

      Appropriate Tees need a revamp and change to the rules (R&A for me here in Scotland). I’ve long held that Tees should have nothing to do with sex or age and everything to do with H’Cap. Across here, we generally have White (Comp’s), Yellow (Male) & Red (Female/Juniors). Instead it should be White: 9 H’Cap or under, Yellow: 10 to 18 & Red: 19 or over.

      Reply

      ROB PERSON

      2 months ago

      Until MGS I’ve always played out to in golf. Had no idea what ready golf actually was until I asked someone.
      Definitely a learning curve to golf, and for those experienced players, take a moment and help someone who may not know or understand how it works instead of criticizing them.

      Reply

      Greg B

      2 months ago

      Unfortunately, there is a breed of golfer that just doesn’t care about others on the course. In fact, I’m seeing this selfish point of view more and more on forums and social media. Quotes along the lines of ‘I’ve paid my money, I’m entitled to play for 4.5 – 5 hours, and screw everybody else’. I’m not sure whether this was a pandemic new golfer thing, or whether it was courses regularly communicating their ‘Time Par’ of 4.5 hours, but it really is getting beyond a joke. Without getting too much into demographics, its always tends to be white males (and I say that as a white male), and they tend to be younger. It is never ever women, in my experience. Maybe they’re watching the pros too much, maybe its the now ubiquitous cannabis on the course, but its really taking a lot of enjoyment out of the game.

      Reply

      Marcus H

      2 months ago

      Thank you for this. Golf cart compilation videos come to mind, and the demographic involved. As well as this year’s Waste Management Open. I feel that this wave of new golfers is from social media.

      Did the same type of antics happen when golf grew because of Tiger Woods? Se-Ri Pak?

      Reply

      MIKE JOHNSON

      2 months ago

      White males 18-25. Loud music, booze/weed, obnoxious behavior, swinging for the fence on every shot. Bring back the draft.

      Reply

      Flsw19

      2 months ago

      Ready Golf is essential to quicker rounds; however as courses have gotten longer, even if you play from forward tees, you must still navigate the full length of the course. In addition to longer playing area; so many modern courses are built to sell real estate; transitions from greens to tees add another 500 to 1000 yards; all of which increases time to play.

      On the other hand my previous golf partner now playing the fairways above, and I often hit simultaneously, since we played opposite sides of the course and were about the same distance. Some find it rude and unsightly but we played quickly and our occasional 5 some played faster than most 4 somes. With 3 70 year olds walking and my little kid in the 60’s riding with 80 year old.

      Reply

      BH

      2 months ago

      If folks would just let people play through, we wouldn’t have this problem. I’m not playing with my track suit on just because the marshal (if there is one) won’t tell a member to gtf out of the way.

      Reply

      Larry

      2 months ago

      Agree on ready golf. However, in my opinion, why is the slow person hardly ever ready? It appears this solves the symtom but not the problem. I have gone as far as to tell slow guys over and over during the course of a round………You’re not ready again, I’ll play. By hole 5 they get the message. Also “out of position” is a great way to let them know they are slow and will skip holes as a result. No way playing through works. It just screw all the following groups. Unless its a 2some.

      Reply

      Joey K

      2 months ago

      Agree on the play thru.

      Hopp Man

      2 months ago

      Then there are the groups that want to play through when there are 3 groups backed up in front of them, eff off, go around if you are in that much of a hurry, until the ranger says something to the one group holding everyone else up, thinking you have the RIGHT to play through three groups in front due to the one slow group is assinine.

      Reply

      Matt Smith

      3 weeks ago

      While the idea of turning the golf course into a go-kart track with players zipping around in their track suits does sound amusing, I believe a little patience and courtesy on the green can go a long way. Let’s just hope the marshal, if one exists, finds a polite way to ensure the fairways remain free of traffic jams. After all, we’re here to enjoy the game, not to test our skills!

      Reply

      Midwest Golfer

      2 months ago

      “Order your beer on the next tee, not in the middle of the fairway.” Good in theory, but not actuality. When do you see the beverage cart? It’s always when you’re in the middle of a hole it seems.

      Reply

      Hopp Man

      2 months ago

      If you are lucky enough to even see one, you also know there is a good chance you won’t see one again.

      Reply

      Jim

      2 months ago

      On point. Weekend rounds especially are so overcrowded and jam packed with those who don’t understand basic rules of golf that it becomes very frustrating. Our group has always said that some basic rules of etiquette are required for golfers – play ready golf, be ready while waiting for those in front, don’t all go into the woods looking for a lost ball, don’t wait to hit until the group in front clears a par 4, etc. And the popular ‘it’s ok to play bad, just play bad fast’. Why can’t the starter outline some simple course rules for every group? And the courses need to back off from the 8 minute tee times as it’s just not realistic and makes the course even more crowded. Trying to get a tee time this year has been difficult and getting worse and then having to endure dimwhits playing and turning a round into over 5 hours long is not fun. The game needs to speed up a little.

      Reply

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