TaylorMade P·Series Iron (P·7MB, P·7MC and P·770)
Irons

TaylorMade P·Series Iron (P·7MB, P·7MC and P·770)

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TaylorMade P·Series Iron (P·7MB, P·7MC and P·770)
  • TaylorMade has launched new P·7MB, P·7MC and P·770 irons.
  • The updated P·Series models feature subtle refinements driven by Tour player feedback.
  • Retail price for all three models is $1,299 for steel and $1,499 for graphite.
  • Available Jan. 20

A photo showing the 2023 versions of the TaylorMade P·7MB, P·7MC and P·770 irons

Promising a massive year for irons, TaylorMade has added three new or, more accurately, updated models to its P·Series iron lineup. While changes to the P·7MB, P·7MC and P·770 admittedly are subtle, they speak to what TaylorMade calls the three pillars of the P·Series: feel, design and performance.

TaylorMade P·7MB Irons

a photo of the TaylorMade P·7MB MB iron

As its name suggests, the P·7MB is the muscle-back iron of the family. According to TaylorMade, it offers “surgical control and precise shot making.” It’s a description that should rightfully speak to a small segment of elite golfers, though players of all ability levels will be drawn—at least on a superficial level—to the clean lines and inarguably pure aesthetic.

It’s a beautiful iron, though I suppose the new symmetrical back bar which positions more mass behind face-center might make the P·7MB feel a bit too modern for some purists. However, those same golfers will certainly appreciate the traditional lofts which include a 20-degree 3-iron, 34-degree 7-iron and 47-degree pitching wedge.

Inspiration for the changes was driven largely by TaylorMade staffers like Rory McIlroy and Colin Morikawa. With that, you get an even shorter blade length and sole that’s one millimeter narrower with a bit of added bounce.

an address view of the TaylorMade P·7MB iron

As precision is kind of a big deal in an MB, the P·7MB offers a machined face and grooves. While that no doubt adds consistency to the iron, it’s done with the intent of capturing the eye of the most discerning golfer.

The P·7MB (and the P·7MC) leverage TaylorMade’s Compact Grain Forging process. If that sounds a bit like Mizuno’s Grain Flow Forging, I suspect it’s not by accident. TaylorMade’s new irons are five-times forged under 2,000 pounds of pressure which the company says is double the industry standard.

a face view of the TaylorMade P7MB Iron

The idea is to tightly align the grain structure of the iron. “Each strike with P·7MB is sensory overload,” says TaylorMade, “delivering unfiltered feedback and best-in-class feel.”

It’s the golfer who will ultimately decide whether that’s true and, while I’m not sure “sensory overload” is what most of us are looking for – even in an MB iron – the rest of it probably is.

TaylorMade P·7MC Irons

a photo of the TaylorMade P7MC Iron

The MC is the true cavity-back in the P·Series lineup. TaylorMade says the updated version was “meticulously scrutinized to meet the performance demands of the game’s best ball strikers.” While that’s probably not you, I wager you’ll appreciate the relatively simple and clean design, though with the forged-in cavity texture and high shine “T-Bug” logo, the MC is arguably the most ornate iron in the P·7 lineup.

The P·7MC is TaylorMade’s most popular iron on the PGA TOUR. Given that distinction, it’s reasonable to expect any updates will be small and likely equally focused as much on not screwing it up as they are on making it just a bit better.

an address view of the TaylorMade P7MC iron

Like the MB, the new P·7MC gets a slightly thinner topline and a narrower sole but, otherwise, TaylorMade wasn’t going to mess with it.

There is a bit of perimeter weighting that offers a hint of forgiveness but it’s certainly not well suited for golfers who are at best center face-adjacent ball strikers.

Like the P·7MB, the P·7MC is five-times forged using TaylorMade Compact Grain Forging process. Lofts match the P·7MB.

TaylorMade P·770 Irons

a photo of the TaylorMade P770 irons

TaylorMade bills the new P·770 iron as “designed for perfection and also built for those who love the grind.”

Like the current P·790, the P·770 offers forged hollow-body construction but you’re unlikely to mistake the two. Most notably, the new P·770 features less offset than the previous iteration. Tiger fell in love with the 3-iron so a good bit of that is driven by what suits Tiger’s eye.

As someone who has found the P·790 slightly large, I thought the P·770 might be an option. One look at the offset (or lack thereof) and I’m out. Make no mistake about it, the P·770 lives on the leading edge of the player’s distance category.

an address view of the 2023 TaylorMade P770 Iron

The 2023 P·790 is filled with the same vibration-dampening SpeedFoam Air polymer found in the current P·790. The lighter material gives TaylorMade’s engineers the flexibility to add additional weight (you guessed it, tungsten) to heads.

You’ll find up to 45 grams of tungsten in the P·770 and, while that’s not massive by today’s standards, it’s no small amount for an iron of the P·770’s size. The addition of tungsten created an opportunity for TaylorMade to leverage what it calls a “flighted center of gravity.”

It’s not wholly uncommon across the industry but the idea is to push the center of gravity low in the long irons (1.1mm lower in the 3-iron) to create an easier-launching high ball flight. As the irons get shorter, the center of gravity is raised to create a more penetrating flight with added spin.

a face view of the TaylorMade P770 iron

Finally, a forged 4140 L face with TaylorMade’s progressive inverted-cone technology works with the Thru-slot Speed Pocket to provide more flex and ultimately more ball speed across the face.

P·770 lofts are only slightly stronger than P·7MB and P·7MC and definitely don’t come close to what we’d describe as “jacked.”

a photo of the 2023 TaylorMade P·7MB, P·7MC and P·770 irons

Pricing and Availability

Retail price for the new TaylorMade P·Series irons is $1,299 with steel shafts and $1,499 with graphite. The stock shaft is a KBS Tour in 130X and 120S. The stock grip is Golf Pride’s Z-Grip. Pre-sale starts now with full retail availability beginning Jan. 20.

For more information, visit TaylorMadeGolf.com.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Capistrano

      10 months ago

      Hello. I plan to try the P-Series Irons, but I want to ensure they fit my needs. And thank you for sharing valuable ideas about them. It has a lot of helpful information about these irons. According to a friend, these irons offer incredible playability, workability, and a softer feel. They also provide different types of performance and feel depending on what is required. But can any of them deliver deeper pivots? 

      Reply

      W

      1 year ago

      Tell TM to quit copying Honma ffs

      Reply

      Jamie

      1 year ago

      Been playing the P770 since April and I love them. The new update looks like a wedge of cheese has been stuck to the back and that’s about it. aside from cosmetic upgrades I don’t think there’s anything they could do to better what I currently have.

      Reply

      Coo

      1 year ago

      Can they quit coping Honma ffs

      Reply

      Mike

      1 year ago

      Nice looking clubs (if you don’t need much or any forgiveness)! But aren’t we getting to the point where most of the OEM next-cycle iron (& most club) changes are predominantly cosmetic? Let me guess, I’ll get 0.5 mph increased ball speed w/ these vs last year’s model.

      Reply

      Ian

      1 year ago

      These all look cool and like a nice refresh in the players iron category for TM. I just want to mention to those who’ve already posted comments about “too expensive” and “not enough of a change for me to upgrade”. These aren’t for you… in fact they aren’t for me either, because I have a set of 9 month old P7 MBs. and I love them. Just because a company comes out with new clubs doesn’t mean you have to own them.

      These are for someone who needs or wants a new set of irons and has the money to spend; if you don’t fall into that silo nobody is interested in your whining. Put your egos aside and remember that not everything in the world is for you.

      Reply

      Mark M

      1 year ago

      Amen Ian.

      Reply

      Willie T

      1 year ago

      Oh well, another OEM new release that is way more than I desire to spend. These are definitely not the recreational golfer’s clubs!

      Reply

      Buz Barlow

      1 year ago

      I’m done buying from Callaway, Titleist, and TaylorMade. My next set of irons will be custom built by Maltby and will perform just as well as any made by the aforementioned manufacturers. at half the price.

      Reply

      Hank

      1 year ago

      If you’d have tried Mizuno or Srixon, you wouldn’t even know Maltby made clubs.

      Reply

      bob

      1 year ago

      While the slight cosmetic changes seem to not justify a new release and the price I think I will wait for that one extra tweak where they stamp at ‘TW’ on the back of each iron, don’t change anything else and decide to upcharge another $750. Then, and only then, will I be ready to buy.

      Reply

      Fred

      1 year ago

      Greatest comment ever – I am on-board

      Reply

      Mike

      1 year ago

      Tony,

      I’m confused by your offset comment on the p770. It looks like your gamers (gen5 T) have as much or less offset than the p770. Are you saying there is too much or too little offset for your eye or is there another aspect that is off putting to you?

      Reply

      Dr Tee

      1 year ago

      Don’t see much difference between the last edition of P770s and the new ones.–at least not enough to make me spend $1300 bucks (less trade in) to “upgrade”
      .

      Reply

      Brian

      1 year ago

      Not sure I see a reason to come out with a new line of irons. A few minor cosmetic updates aren’t gonna improve performance.

      Reply

      Bob E. Smith

      1 year ago

      Once again out of my price range. For those that can’t afford it enjoy

      Reply

      Matt

      1 year ago

      Will TM be releasing a new P790 for 2023 also?

      Reply

      Steve S

      1 year ago

      Love the look of these clubs. Wish I was young enough and good enough to play them. Of course, even when I was young and played blades(that’s all there was) I wasn’t good enough.

      Reply

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