Temu Finds: Weighted Putting Practice Ball
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Temu Finds: Weighted Putting Practice Ball

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Temu Finds: Weighted Putting Practice Ball

If you have followed this series, you know I am a sucker for putting training aids. I have reviewed putting mats and trainers with varying degrees of success. Among my favorite training aids are the PuttOUT and PuttOUT Devil Ball. Use these together and they are even better. It’s the reason why this weighted training ball intrigued me so much. It seemed to be an alternate take on the PuttOUT Devil Ball with added options. Without further ado, let’s get into it.

The Problem

The biggest issue I find with putting practice or training is how repetitive and mundane it can get. It’s the same thing over and over, maybe with slight changes in distance or angles but, ultimately, it is difficult to replicate the various putts and changes that happen on a golf course.

The Solution

The weighted putting practice ball could be a product that breaks the mold and brings added variety to your putting training. It is a balance practice ball much like the Devil Ball or CrestGolf Ball but with interior weights that can be removed or added to change the speed and feel of the ball.

How It Works? (Or Doesn’t)

Unfortunately, the instructions were not overly explanatory, but the ad describes basic instructions and practice methods. I tried these and they were OK. However, I found better uses for the practice ball than those recommended.

The build quality is surprisingly good for a $5 training aid. The wheel portion of the ball is plastic that has the feel of a cheap two-piece golf ball but it does the trick. On each side, there are three steel rings that can be added or removed for different speeds and feel. Have all six in and it feels heavy, much like putting on a slower green. Take them all out and it is near feather-light for an entirely different experience. I found having two weights to be the sweet spot that was similar to a normal golf ball.

To keep the weights in and secure, the ball has two red sides with an inner thread that is secured by a little Allen key tool. It works well. The process of changing the weights isn’t annoying or time-consuming.

Did It Help Break Mundane Practice?

At first, it certainly did. The change in feel with the various weights was drastic. I would liken it to starting an early-morning round with soft, damp greens that quicken as the sun starts to beat down. This is a situation I run into nearly every round so I do find it useful but in terms of long-term practice? This is where the other function comes into play. As the edges are cut in half, making perfect putts isn’t the easiest and any stray face angles at impact will veer the ball off course.

Of course, I have used these types of training aids before, so getting a handle on it was quick. For those who struggle with setup and alignment, this is a very valuable training aid.

The recommended method of practice is to make a total of 40 putts: 10 with each weight setting, starting from the heaviest down to the lightest. It is also always recommended to have equal weights on both sides for better balance. However, I did find removing a weight or two helped a little to work like a breaking putt.

All this being said, it still is not a game-changer for putting practice. But maybe it doesn’t have to be?

It combines two features that affect two of the most important parts of putting: line and speed. Weights change the speed and the shape works on the line. It is a simple product that does work and, as I have used it more, I have come to appreciate it more as well.

Bottom Line

This is a very basic putting training aid that does what it is built to. It won’t revolutionize your putting practice nor is it built to be a fix for all putting woes but it does offer enough variety and customization to help with putting consistency.

The basic instructions will lead to practice fatigue and boredom but, combined with some creativity and even two-speed putting mats, this product helps give a lot of speed options that can help mimic lag putts a little better than most.

For a minimal cost, this putting aid has value. It certainly can be a solid addition to anyone who wants to work on their putting.

For You

For You

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Jamie Danbrook

Jamie Danbrook

Jamie Danbrook

Jamie is the MyGolfSpy Forum Director. A Canadian living in Switzerland can often be found posting on the forum under the username GolfSpy_APH. When not on the forum he can be found on the course, or with his wife, two kids and three dogs hiking and exploring. He prides himself in being a lefty golfer and is still in search of his elusive first hole in one.

Jamie Danbrook

Jamie Danbrook

Jamie Danbrook

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Jamie Danbrook

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Jamie Danbrook





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      CDubya

      4 weeks ago

      I guess the biggest item not discussed is how it compares to other (more expensive) aids mentioned in the article. Or does it?

      Reply

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