TIPS FOR YOUR NEXT IRON FITTING
Irons

TIPS FOR YOUR NEXT IRON FITTING

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TIPS FOR YOUR NEXT IRON FITTING

You signed up for an iron fitting. Smart.

Getting fitted is something we preach relentlessly at MyGolfSpy. When it comes to finding the best-performing gear for your game, it’s an absolute necessity.

Now what?

We’ve compiled our best tips, based on experience, to help you get the most out of your fitting.

Like anything else, it helps to have a game plan.

Before we dive into specifics, let’s state the obvious: You’re the customer. Yes, the fitter is providing a service but too many golfers show up, passively receive feedback and then make decisions based on incomplete (or, even worse, inaccurate) information.

The active consumer is discerning and understands what questions to ask. This consumer has a clear objective and some idea as to the relative strengths and weaknesses of his/her game. This isn’t to suggest you need to have everything figured out. If that were the case, you’d simply hop online and place an order.

General Tips

Before we examine two common fitting scenarios, consider the following questions and talking points.

  • A set of irons is really a collection of clubs, each with a unique purpose. As a result, a combo set that combines different models is something most golfers should consider.
  • Know your primary fitting objective. Is it changing ball flight? More forgiveness? Increased distance? If you have four-plus objectives, you probably don’t have any. Pick one (or two) and focus on those.
  • More distance CAN be beneficial. But this isn’t always the case.
  • Always, always, always pay attention to launch angle, spin rates, descent angle and shot shape. If possible, get a copy of the fitting recommendations with this information.
  • Carry distance is more important than total distance.
  • Every fitting is theoretical until you actually get the clubs out on the course. Should the need arise, what options exist to re-fit or tweak specifications within a reasonable amount of time?

An address view of the Honma 2021 irons

It Takes Two

We’re going to focus on two (possibly two-and-a-half) typical fitting environments.

The first is a brand-specific fitting where the golfer works one-on-one with a fitter representing a single manufacturer.

The second is a brand-agnostic setup where a company (True Spec, Club Champion, etc.) maintains inventory from various manufacturers and works with the golfer to find the optimal head/shaft combination.

The “half” scenario is the demo-day experience where one (or several) companies set up at a driving range. Golfers roam around kicking tires and company representatives hand out different clubs to try. This approach is a glorified shopping trip with some basic guidance. And while it’s better than buying blindly off the rack, the primary benefit is being able to try several brands in one location, often without paying for range balls.

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A Lot About a Little

The primary benefit in getting fitted by a single brand is that the fitter should be well versed in every club, feature, spec and custom option for each club the brand offers. It also gives that company more control in curating the entire fitting-purchase-delivery process.

The net result is that there’s a better chance to be optimally fitted into clubs from that specific brand.

However, this doesn’t mean the optimal fit from that company will be better than whatever the best option is from any other manufacturer. If that isn’t absolutely, 100-percent crystal clear, stop. Pause and reread the last couple of sentences. This is the primary difference between the two fitting scenarios.

This brings me to my next point. It’s exceedingly unlikely any single manufacturer makes the best 14 clubs for your game. In fact, if you see someone with a bag full of clubs from one brand, you can be relatively certain the primary reason for this is money, not performance.

First-Person

I’ve been through iron fittings in different environments and, regardless of brand or situation, the quality of the fitting is largely determined by the expertise of the fitter.

Also, fitters, like instructors, tend to develop and refine a fitting philosophy over time. Just some thoughts to keep in mind.

In this instance, I went through an iron fitting with our local Honma rep, Kyle. Honma offers a mobile fitting experience that is designed to mimic a Tour-level fitting, albeit at your home course. Unfortunately for Honma, it decided to eschew the typical retail channels in favor of its mobile platform leading into 2020. And if you were in the business of selling golf equipment in early 2020, the retail space was either terrible or awful. Most golfers had nowhere to play and thus very little need for new equipment. Brick-and-mortar retailers had plenty of inventory but no way to effectively get it to consumers.

Eventually, courses started to open but, without a significant presence at big-box retail, Honma couldn’t capitalize on the surge in demand many manufacturers experienced during the typically calmer back-half of the season. That said, Honma is optimistic that its original plan—though delayed—will yield better results in 2021.

While none of that directly impacted my fitting with Kyle, it can be beneficial to have some background on the brand, especially in a single-company fitting scenario.

Let’s Get Fitted

Back to the actual iron fitting.

The first question Kyle asked was, “What are you looking to improve?” One point for Kyle.

I told him I didn’t want to chase distance but I wanted to explore different weights/flexes of shafts to see if we could tighten up ball flight and dispersion.

Regarding set make-up, my wedges are 50, 56 and 60 degrees. I also carry a 5-wood which leaves me seven open slots. My initial thinking was to go 5-PW and then possibly some sort of driving-iron/utility club.

Honma carries four iron models in its TR line (TR21 X, TR20 P, TR20 V and TR20 B). The TR 21X is a hollow-bodied, player’s distance iron. At the other end of the spectrum, the TR20 B is a single-piece forged muscle-back iron. Given that Honma developed the line to offer myriad custom combinations, I wasn’t surprised that Kyle ultimately suggested that I combine the TR21 X and TR20 V.

Only The 7-Iron

As opposed to a driver fitting, iron fittings revolve around a single club, generally the 7-iron.

It would be cost- (and inventory-) aversive to carry all possible shaft/head combinations for every loft offered throughout a set. That said, this often results in a player trying to envision how a club will look and perform in a different loft.

Case in point: Through trial and error and gathering data via the Foresight GC Quad launch monitor, we landed on a suitable shaft. Kyle’s process was simple. We hit a few shots with different shafts and then assessed the data. Because our goal was improved accuracy, we found the shaft that produced the smallest ellipse that represented the highest concentration of shots while maintaining an acceptable carry distance.

Not that my numbers should dictate what anyone else does, but the best shaft/head combo produced 6,000-6,500 rpm backspin, a launch angle of 18 to 20 degrees and a descent angle of +/- 45 degrees.  The total carry hovered around 180-185 yards at 5,000 feet of elevation. To be clear, these numbers aren’t markedly different from my trusty gamers (Mizuno MP-20).

However, because we felt it would be beneficial to switch to the TR21 X in the longer irons, it was a bit of a guessing game as to how this might impact performance. It’s not a drastic leap to tell a golfer, “Hey, hit this 7-iron but imagine it’s a 4-iron.” Then again, if the point of a fitting is to eliminate variables, this exercise reaffirms the reasonable expectation that a company provides a follow-up fitting once you receive the clubs.

Limitations

Each manufacturer fits golfers based on a set of priorities. However, at the end of the day, every company wants to sell clubs, and fitters are generally incentivized based on sales targets.

The difference often lies in how each company (and each fitter) goes about closing the deal.

The primary limitation for a company like Honma is that its best fitters know that selling a full bag of Honma clubs looks great on paper but doesn’t entirely serve the needs of the golfer. With that, the prudent approach is only to buy a new club if it offers better performance than what you already own.

For what’s it’s worth, Taylor Hull (Honma’s master fitter in Vancouver, British Columbia) echoed similar sentiments.

In my conversations with both Taylor and Kyle, it’s clear Honma understands that even the most open-minded consumers aren’t likely to purchase a full bag of Honma clubs after a single fitting.

In fact, it’s often easier to build trust by starting with an “easy win” where the golfer can see a clear performance difference. It might mean selling a single wedge or fairway wood, but no sale is too small to matter, right?

Proprietary

Honma Vizard shafts

Honma produces proprietary graphite shafts (Vizard) for irons and metalwoods. Apart from PING, which co-engineers shafts with UST Mamiya among others, this is atypical for the industry.

The tradeoff is similar to that of Honma’s mobile fitting experience, in general. Proprietary shafts typically reduce the selection of competing products. In this case, more Vizard shafts mean fewer high-end Fujikura, Mitsubishi and Graphite Design shafts in the fitting quiver.

We also have to mention build quality and spec tolerance. If the optimal fit came from a 7-iron with 34 degrees of loft and 62 degrees of lie, D3 swing weight and a shaft with a CPM of 300, then it stands to reason that any deviation from those specs could impact overall performance.

You don’t necessarily need to know exactly what each of those specs means to appreciate the concept.

Let’s say you get an estimate to replace a window in your home with an opening of 36 1/8 inches. If the window shows up and it’s off by 1/128 inches, it’s probably OK. If it’s off by a full inch, that’s an issue.

To be clear, each manufacturer has its own quality control practices and building tolerances. So rather than assuming anything, it’s worth asking what you should reasonably expect should you decide to purchase.

A Little About a Lot

So-called brand-agnostic fittings purport to give golfers optimal performance by selecting components from an array of manufacturers.

Club Champion and True Spec are two of the largest fitters in this segment of the market. Each operates multiple locations throughout the United States and, in the case of True Spec, Europe as well. That said, there are plenty of one-off local options, such as New York Golf Center in Manhattan, that offer a similar approach.

On paper, the mix and match philosophy makes a great deal of sense. It acknowledges the reality that no single brand makes the best equipment for any golfer. Moreover, it’s less likely that the golfer will feel like the fitter is pushing one brand over another. But it isn’t fool-proof. More on that in a bit.

Ultimately, the fundamentals of an iron fitting should revolve around three components, regardless of environment, philosophy or corporate structure.: 1) The golfer’s objective, 2) the fitter’s product knowledge and expertise, and 3) the ability of the fitter to match the equipment to the golfer based on the objective.

It sounds simple but devil …  details … all of that.

Compared to a single-manufacturer fitting, brand-agnostic fitters have a far more extensive inventory from which to select. That’s a clear and undeniable advantage. Also, most incorporate class-leading launch monitors such as Foresight GC Quad or Trackman to record all pertinent head and club data. So what’s not to like?

Downside?

The benefits are obvious and make great fodder for commercials and marketing materials. It’s easy to see why a serious golfer with a more flexible budget would go this route.

That said, it’s fair to discuss the foibles, which tend to be more obscure. A wall full of shafts and drawers replete with fitting heads looks mighty impressive when you walk in the door. But the chance your fitter has encyclopedic recall and can compare head/shaft combinations on the fly is winning the lottery and getting struck by lightning on the same day unlikely.

The alternative is that the fitter is well-versed in several brands and works within those confines as often as possible.

In addition, fitting software can help narrow acceptable choices based on selected parameters. It’s a bit like paying for a cable TV package with 225 channels but only watching 10.

Cost is always relative. The only reason I’m bringing it up in this context is that it’s worth considering at what point you might be throwing good money after bad.

The margins on expensive aftermarket shafts and services such as SST PURE shaft alignment tend to work disproportionately in favor of the fitter. Whether any head/shaft combination or service is “worth it” is a simple matter of opportunity cost. Given three head/shaft combinations, each with varying costs, the question is, “Does the difference in price justify the potential difference in performance?”

Ultimately, it comes down to whether you, the consumer, find value in what the fitter is trying to sell you. Some golfers are willing to spare no expense in order to account for every variable. Others have a larger range of what qualifies as acceptable.

Which Road?

Is there a perfect option? Not necessarily. What’s clear is that every alternative has clear benefits and some drawbacks. That said, some level of fitting is vastly better than blindly buying off the rack.

Fitting is an evolving discipline within the golf equipment space. Before launch monitors, common fitting points of analysis included ball flight, divot patterns and lie boards. Now, data is ubiquitous and the best fitters will separate themselves chiefly through an ability to cater to the unique swing characteristics of each golfer.

Speaking of which, I had no idea whether Maya Angelou cared much for golf, but she did state, “When you know better, do better.” What we know now is that strokes-gained analysis allows golfers to quantify performance far better than generic statistics like fairways hit, greens in regulation and number of putts.

This shift in knowledge likely represents the next frontier in fitting. It’s only getting easier for golfers to gather personalized data. But evaluating, assessing, connecting and responding to real, on-course performance and using this information to make more informed decisions about equipment … wouldn’t that be something?

While you ponder that, I’m going to adjust the settings on my smart thermostat and book the oil change my car just reminded me I should have taken care of two weeks ago.

What questions do you have? What other information might be helpful?

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Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

Chris is a self-diagnosed equipment and golf junkie with a penchant for top-shelf ice cream. When he's not coaching the local high school team, he's probably on the range or trying to keep up with his wife and seven beautiful daughters. Chris is based out of Fort Collins, CO and his neighbors believe long brown boxes are simply part of his porch decor. "Isn't it funny? The truth just sounds different."

Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel





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      Aaron

      3 years ago

      This is a lot of great information Chris. I really enjoyed this article and I’ve made some notes to keep in the back of my mind for any future fittings. I am curious to hear your thoughts on the actual purchasing as a result of a fitting. I was just looking at the purchase options for a Miura iron and they off a service called SST Pure fitting. Do other OEM’s do this? Is it something OEM’s might do on their own behind the scenes that we, as consumers, might not be aware of? Is it something that can be done after the fact? From the little I know about it from the Miura page, it would seem this is an integral part of getting clubs that maximize your fitting by providing more consistent clubs. Thoughts?

      Reply

      Jim P.

      3 years ago

      Love this article. Tons of great info. I have been fitted many times and have made purchases for my Driver from Club Champion (Callaway Epic Max LS, Fuji Speeder TR 757x, Swingweight D8) and Irons from TrueSpec (Srixon Z785s with Rifle Frequency 7.0’s – 145g TX flex). Here’s a question – I have a gap from my Driver (300+) to my 2 driving iron (Srixon Z u85 at 250 yards) and have room for a club to fill that spot. I can hear you saying “Just get a 3 wood” but here’s the rub – I RARELY play from tees longer than 6,800 yards or so for several reasons. First, many courses I play max out around that distance and second, even though I could play from the tips at most courses (I play off 4 and hit the ball far), I won’t do that if I’m playing with buddies or random foursomes where everyone else is playing the one-up tees. I feel like a bit of a D. As a result, I already have tons of Driver/Wedge holes and almost never need a club that goes 275 and fits that gap nicely. What I DO need, though, is a club I am more comfortable hitting from the fairway and/or rough than the 2iron, which is more of a safety net off the tee than anything. So, with all that in mind, I’ve been fit into a 5wood with a softer shaft (G425 with Fuji Speeder EVO IV 757s) to give it a bit more launch that’s easy to hit off the fairway and rough for recoveries if my Drive hits a tree or I have a long par 5 I’m trying to reach in 2. Does this sound like a good plan? Would love some feedback on this.

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Without seeing any hard numbers, it’s a bit tough to say, but in general, this sounds like a reasonable idea.

      One other thought would be a lower-lofted hybrid which all things being equal, could be better out of the rough and give you more recovery options than a 5-wood.

      Reply

      Gary

      3 years ago

      The primary goal of stand alone fitting companies is selling premium shafts and charging for the build of the club.. If you want stock shafts a big box store will work. So a $500 driver becomes a $1000 driver with premium shaft and build charge, grip charge and tax. Figure $3-4k for a full set. But, you know your clubs and shafts are dialed in for you. Plus you get the white glove service. It’s all about budget and goals.

      Reply

      Brian F

      3 years ago

      Any suggestions on how to compare clubs that you demo at your club in a brand-specific fitting to clubs demoed a few weeks later at your club in a different brand-specific fitting? Unfortunately, the first fitting did not send me the trackman data, so I can’t compare the numbers. Thanks.

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Without numbers or some type of baseline information, it’s tough to make any real definitive comparisons – No doubt, your own subjective opinions come in to play, but unless you’re comparing side by side and/or using a reliable launch monitor, it’s a swimming-up-stream situation.

      Reply

      Brendan

      3 years ago

      Third scenario. The golfer who just wants some cool clubs.

      I`ve been fit before, so I know my specs. I simply ordered the new P770 irons via a custom dealer. By far, my best golf purchase. The clubs are amazing and are just a thing of beauty. As a result, my striking has improved and I`m really enjoying hitting them, the ball flight is amazing (I had the Ping g400 prior to these – I was fit for those).
      As with all new club purchases, it takes time to get used to the new clubs. So people should bear this in mind.
      It could be said, yes who knows if the shaft I got is the best….. well it`s certainly good enough for me. I don`t really care if another shaft may be better, or another club head for that matter. Golf is so difficult and the search for the best club doesn`t make sense to me. These days, so many clubs are so good that I`m not searching the best performance club, just clubs that I enjoy to hit.

      Reply

      pineneedlespro

      3 years ago

      All good club fitters first get background information about the student, want him/her to feel comfortable. It should be the goal to find the students preferences (they are the ones swinging the club). Must like the looks of the clubs to begin. There should be a fitting sequence=model-lie-length-shaft type-flex+grip.. Analyzing ball flight (best done outdoors). I like to fix the students swing flaws first when I do fittings. Sometimes it takes a 45 minute iron fitting, and sometimes it may take 2 or 3 appointments. Also a performance scoresheet to track on-course shots that indicate potential undesirable patterns. helps. Also ball flight preferences of the golfer takes priority over impact tape markings. I spine all shafts to 9 o’clock (unless told differently for a golfer who likes to work the ball) so that miss hits still go straight.

      Reply

      James

      3 years ago

      My son is a top junior player and we’ve been through a few fittings with irons and drivers. He and I have come to understand the numbers and things the numbers don’t say. He can tell in a swing if a shaft is right for him and is picky as anything about the appearance of the clubs.. His main thing is consistent distance with tight dispersion and of course the right feel. His current set of irons he essentially fit himself on the Trackman on the home course using the fitting cart.. He’s been better with his own fit than any fitter has done for him. He recently did his driver and 3 wood and again did better for himself. Scoring reflects the results since he dropped from a 1 to a +3 with his own fitting

      Reply

      charles thomas

      3 years ago

      Great , he can only know, but the input from a fitter can increase his knowledge in putting together a set

      Reply

      Gary

      3 years ago

      My son is a tour pro and I’ve watched his game grow. A highly skilled golfer like your son does know in one or two swings if a club is right. But even my son in his late 20’s benefits from talking with his fitter. Be good for your son to cultivate a relationship with a highly qualified local fitter and maintain that relationship.

      Reply

      Brian F

      3 years ago

      Any suggestions on how to compare drivers tested at a brand-specific fitting to another driver tested at a different brand-specific fitting a couple weeks later? The first fitting did not send me the numbers from the fitting other than from one shot, only the recommended club and specs. I’m guessing both drivers will feel and sound good. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.

      Reply

      Odie

      3 years ago

      Chris – what’s your opinion on getting fitted for the same shaft for irons and wedges? I was fit about four years ago at Club Champion for Titleist TMBs with Steelfiber shafts, but it was only an iron fit. Wedges are Callaway off the rack 54-60. Other than consistency of feel…any performance benefits?

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Odie – For me, a good rule of thumb is to stick with the same shaft as in your irons on wedges that you primarily use for a full swing. This often includes “gap” and “approach” wedges. Effectively, they just become pitching wedges with weaker lofts.

      Now, once you start getting into specialty wedges (Sw./Lw), I would absolutely look at different shaft options. Every player is different, but you might find that something a bit heavier gives you a better sense of feel around the greens. It’s also pretty common to go down at least 1/2 a flex.

      At a minimum, I’d look at the various options and your fitter should be able to help explain the benefits of different shafts – For example, a KBS 610 vs. a Hi Rev 2.0

      Reply

      Andrew

      3 years ago

      In the past 2-3 years, I’ve had the pleasure of doing fittings with 3 of Golf Digest’s top 100. Here is a summary of my experience and what I have learned.

      For reference, I’m an average sized guy. My driver swing speed is 95-100 mph. My driver carry is 240-250. A well struck 7 iron (at 30 degrees loft) carries 145-150.. My handicap varies between 6-9 depending on how often I am playing (i.e. consistency).

      All of my fittings were “iron only” fittings and brand-agnostic.

      The first was at an independent fitter. Outdoors with a Trackman but hitting off a mat (strange huh?) In summary, player’s distance irons are right up my alley. I’m a good enough ball striker to hit pure blades, but my lack of distance makes them a terrible option. Who wants their 7 iron to carry 125? I am told I need to go lighter in the shafts to keep my swing speed higher but still need to be in a stiff shaft (sounds counterintuitive to me). KBS Tour 90 stiff is the recommendation and I should be 2 degrees up.

      I ordered a set of irons after fitting #1 and played them for a year with the KBS Tour 90 stiff’s. They were ok. For whatever reason, I never felt the shafts were right for me. All my life I had played TT DG’s that are much heavier. I did feel like going lighter than TTDG’s was the right move, I just didn’t like the KBS for some reason. That is what led me on a quest to find something better.

      Next up about a year later is a fitting at True Spec. Outdoors, hitting off grass, with a Trackman again. My one hour fitting turns into 2.5 hours. I end up hitting almost every head/stiff shaft combo they offer in several variations of lie and club length. Ending recommendation is play whatever shaft I think feels best as the results aren’t very different and I would benefit from going + 1/4 inch longer in the shaft (I agree with this 100%)..

      Fitting number 3 is at Club Champion, indoors off a mat. I did this a week after True Spec. This was definitely the highest pressure sales pitch of the bunch but it wasn’t terrible by any means. As with fitting #1, I keep getting pushed into lighter shafts to gain more swing speed and distance (but still stiff profiles). At one point I’m hitting SteelFiber 80’s and being told that’s the best one for me and I definitely should get them pured.

      After this, I ended up spending way too many hours reading about different shafts online. I ended up ordering a set of irons with TT XP95 stiffs. Here’s the kicker. I never hit this shaft in any of the 3 fittings. I went with it based upon what I had read online and what I had gleaned from my fitting experiences.

      I’ve been playing the XP95’s for over a year now. Compared to the KBS Tour 90’s I love them. Way better shaft for my swing for some reason, even though they are pretty comparable when you look at their specs.

      But I still feel like there’s something out there better for me. Just for fun, I hit a bucket of balls with a buddy of mine. He plays some old TM’s from like 2008 with TTDG stiffs. We’re talking shafts that are about 30 grams heavier than my XP95’s. I don’t have an issue flighting his irons but I wouldn’t want to go that heavy again.

      I’ve also spent lots of time hitting different heads/shaft combinations at my local Golf Store. I’ve found that going slightly heavier than my XP95’s but not to the other end of the spectrum is probably better for me. For whatever reason, TT’s feel the best to me.

      My plan at this point is to essentially fit myself. Instead of spending another $100-$150 on another fitting, I’m simply going to have my 7 iron re-shafted into a TTDG 105 Stiff. I’ll play if for a month and if there’s not a noticeable difference, I’ll have it re-shafted again and again until I find the perfect shaft for me.

      Moral of my story I guess is this. The types of fittings us non-professionals have access too are a good starting point but if you really want the best product for your swing, nothing is going to beat trial and error on the course.

      Reply

      Garrett

      3 years ago

      I appreciate your write up Andrew, definitely echoed a lot of my thoughts. I don’t have easy access to the fitting experiences you have but I do think having experienced all of the different fitting environments, gives me the more information to make an informed decision.

      Similar to you, I’ve played heavier shafts my entire life, 130 grams. After independent research, I concluded I needed lighter shafts. Went to a local indoor brand agnostic fitter.. After hitting numerous shafts and on numerous heads, the fitter asks me an interesting question. “Where did you get your current clubs and what are the specs on them?”

      My current set at the time came from a brand specific fitting on a driving range on grass. I didn’t remember the specs. Fitter takes my clubs to measure them and tells me the are 5° upright, and that there is no way a fitter should have fit me to clubs that way and they could have just been built incorrectly. I know I have a very vertical swing but I didn’t know the clubs and my eyes caused this.

      What I learned is that you can put any club in my hand, no matter the lie angle, I will set the club on the ground to where the club appears to be flat on the ground, set my hands at that height, and swing. My eye’s dictate where I set my hands and my hands dictate my swing profile.

      The fitter set me back to standard lie angle, my hands dropped back down to normal, my swing flattened out, and I was able to correct my over the top swing from 3°-4° out to in down to 0°-1° out to in. With practice, I now have a better ability to work the ball and get my swing in to out.

      And back to weight, after hitting multiple shafts and the detour we took on lie angle, the realization the fitter and I had was that I didn’t need to go from 130g all the way down to 90g, a smaller adjustment of 10g lighter would be enough for comfort and suit my goals and swing. And ever since, it feels like a weight has been taken off my shoulders or in this case, my arms.

      One extra point, I think that everyone has a preference on the weight ratio of shaft to club head. My personal preference is that the club feels like it is one piece. Whenever I hit a friends clubs and the club head feels like it is a heavier weight at the end of the shaft, I hate it.

      Reply

      Gabriel

      3 years ago

      I came up to the same conclusion as you, came back to golf after 10 years, decided to get fitted by one of the best where I live in Canada, I played “dumb” during my fitting pretending not knowing anything about numbers, I let him do his job, he fitted me with ping g425 elevate tour stiff (2 upright) basically he said I was missing height on my shot (which was my own conclusion, couldn’t hold green 10 years ago and was basically hitting left of the target mostly(im lefty)), Regular shaft or elevate stiff had very similar result but he said that stiff flex will serve you more in the future since you came back to golf and your swing speed will increase a few mph. He made me try ping, mizuno and taylormade, didn’t like taylormade feel, mizuno was more expensive..
      Took me a little while to get used to my shaft, lighter shaft really do feel weird. Getting fit is a very good start, after that you either need the best fitter or simply fit yourself in the long run. Fitting knowledge goes a long way.

      Reply

      Matt Wiseley

      3 years ago

      As a golfer that has been through two fittings at Club Champion, I can attest that the fun of hitting multiple shafts and heads is great. Most places and none in NM where I live have anywhere near the options available. That said, I wonder if It would be better to go to Ping in Phoenix or TM in Carlsbad or really any manufacturer fitting location? Chris, do you know if going there they will fit you hitting multiple clubs and not just a 6 or 7 iron? This article combined with the recap of the survey of what everyone is playing makes me think that hitting only 1 iron in a fitting is probably leading a lot of golfers from getting mixed iron sets. Thoughts?

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Matt – No doubt, getting fit for a “set” of irons with a 6 or 7 iron is a limitation. But it’s cost aversive for really anyone to carry multiple demo heads, though you’d have a better chance likely at PING, TM, Titleist, etc. Again, it’s one reason I feel strongly that any fitting should account for the needs of the golfer after the clubs bought and paid for.

      Reply

      Matt W

      3 years ago

      Thanks for the reply Chris. Great articles and info as usual.

      Joel

      3 years ago

      Great article, Chris! Funny enough, Taylor fit me for my first set of irons after a nearly fifteen-year hiatus from golf. Back then, he was with TaylorMade and set me up with a super game improvement set of M2 irons, milled grind wedges and hybrids, suggesting I hold-off on the driver and fairway until I had some lessons. He also recommended a local instructor, who I still take lessons with! Fast forward a year into lessons, I went to a local brand-agnostic fitter to test drivers and fairways, walking away with two great feeling Srixon clubs. And while I walked into the fitting set on TM’s, the data proved they weren’t for me in terms of distance or dispersion. Fast forward another three years and I was jonesing for a new set of irons, so I went to the fitters, but didn’t find anything that spoke to me, aside from an egregiously expensive set of PXG’s that felt like a religious experience. I couldn’t justify the expense for my high-handicap… until PXG lowered the price on the Gen3s. I’ve now replaced my irons with a fitted set of Gen3s and a new set of Ping Glide 3.0 wedges, and shot my best round, ever, this past weekend. If there’s anything I’ve learned, it that fitting makes a huge difference, no matter your skill level. I’ve also learned to check my ego at the door, to trust the data and to trust my gut in terms of feel. As always, I appreciate MGS for everything it brings to the industry.

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Joel – Always great to hear the success stories and like you said – fitting is. something every golfer should consider regardless of skill level.

      Reply

      Sean Mahoney

      3 years ago

      Hi Chris,

      Thank you for the write up.

      Do you think the SST Pure process is worth it? I am a big believer in taking away equipment variability so I like to make sure it is done and built to the exact spec.

      To your point, I find value in it so I pay.

      But is it tightening the variability enough or does it really depends on each manufacturers QC standards just like the golf balls?

      Love No Putts Given and you and think a lot a like. Thanks again!

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Hi Sean – SST Pure is quite the rabbit hole. But really, it’s pretty simple. If you want to control every variable, then SST Pure makes sense. And there are plenty of golfers that are willing to pay a little more to check off this particular box.

      Beyond that, you’ll find a lot of arguments on both sides. Club Champion purchased SST Pure several years ago and no doubt, has internal testing it points to as validation. But, you generally don’t hear that from shaft manufacturers, which makes sense as well.

      All that aside, it could make for a great lab experiment, but based on the evidence i’ve seen thus far, I’m not comfortable saying it’s definitively better for every golfer.

      Reply

      Sean Mahoney

      3 years ago

      Thank you Chris. Love you on No Putts Given!

      George

      3 years ago

      Vizard shafts have stainless steel fiber sheets with the metalic fiber Bolfur®. I’ll put these up against any other shaft out there.

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Strip away the paint and the ingredients that make up some Vizard shafts will read a lot like other high-end shafts. That said, I’ve found that golfers with quick transitions or heavy-loaders often struggle with a lot of the Vizard line –

      Reply

      R. Lizzio

      3 years ago

      Keep in mind that when fitters brag “we are the number 1 (brand) fitter in North Carolina (or where ever) it means nothing. It means they sell allot of clubs which means they probably don’t spend much time with you or care about really fitting you correctly.

      Reply

      Max R

      3 years ago

      I got fitted Spring 2020 with my local Mizuno representative. I used my Titlelist AP2 (710) to use warm up and the base to compare what could be offered. They used their proprietary Shaft Optimizer. Three swings and you’re good to go. After a few tweaks with different Mizuno models (MP series, JPX series) and a number of shafts, I got the best match. Longer, tight standard deviation, etc.

      Reply

      I tend to stick with clubs past their “pull date”. I am in the market for irons to replace my Titleist CBs. I really like them but age has cost me a few MPHs and when I replaced the shafts in my woods and hybrids going from S to R flex with the same model shafts I gained a few yards and now have a 5-7 yard larger gap between my 5 iron and 4 hybrid than I want. I have hit T100/200/300 heads and think that a combo set of 100/200 5-pw will work for me and I want to concentrate on ball flight and gapping between my 50* gap wedge and 4 hybrid with a 5-PW set. As you stated 1 or 2 objectives might be the best wat to go. Does it sound like I might be on track? The fitter I am thinking of using has an outdoor facility with mats. and flight trackers..

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Yes, I do think you’re on the right track. A couple of questions to consider:

      1) How often do you find yourself in the middle of a distance gap?
      2) What is the gap between your 4 hybrid and your next hybrid/fairway wood?
      3) Depending on exactly how large the gaps are and how often you find yourself in this situation, you could possibly look at bending the 5 iron a bit strong as well. Feel free to shoot me an email if you’d like to discuss further!

      Reply

      Russ Farrer

      3 years ago

      After not buying new clubs for 25 years And getting back into the game after an 8 year lay off and not being able to hit my club out of my shadow. They were old forged cavity backs made by Founders club Tour CB the Judge, any way the shafts were for a younger mans swing so I new I need something better.
      Went into golf tech, but they were more interested in selling me a package plan of lessons and only had 6 brands they fit with.
      I found TXG website a couple of fitters in Canada that I really wanted to go to, but alas covid ruled the world at the time, so I went with Club Champion.
      Lots of selections heads and shafts, felt no pressure for any manufacturers. Went in with 5 different clubs manufacturers in mind.
      Thought Ping would be the woods but ended up with Cobra Rad Speed. Was real interested in Mizuno MP20 HMB’s but lead times from manufacturer was at least 16 weeks, ending up with Taylormade P770’s & Cleveland zipcore wedges & a Scotty Cameron special select Putter
      They sent me all the data on every club I hit, distance, dispersement club speed etc. Took 10 weeks to get them in and they threw in 2 one hour sessions on TrackMan to help me know the yardages.
      All in all I’m a bit longer off the tee, but more importantly straighter, my irons are about two clubs stronger than before and my dispersement is very much improved and the putter, well let’s just say it’s a very nice putter, if I hit it to the right spot I mostly make the putts..
      I’m glade I got the fitting, spent a lot of $$$ but I’m happy with how I hit my stix’s and have a few people ask me just how old I am, when I out drive them and hit the green in regulation.

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      For someone who has had fittings for my driver, hybrids and wedges, I actually fitted myself to my irons, and I LOVE them. Crazy quirk, but I guess even the blind squirrel is occasionally right.

      Reply

      vincent schiavo

      3 years ago

      I’ve heard that a blind squirrel is right twice a day!

      Reply

      Rusty

      3 years ago

      I’m 51, I’ve owned two sets of big branded golf clubs over a span of playing golf for 36 years, including the 10+ year old iron set I’m currently using now..
      Both sets were purchased off the shelf, stock standard.
      I still hit great shots with my current clubs and have been contemplating being fit for years.
      I’m a once a month if lucky twice a month player and rarely have time to practice, I’m currently playing off 12 and think I can get to single figures if I played more often. My biggest drawback to being fitted is do I play enough and how much will it improve my golf and lower my scores and help me gain consistency..
      Will jacked lofts give me extra distance probably, falsely though?
      Will my poor course management have a counter effect on my newly fitted sticks?
      Golf has so many different probabilities I guess?
      Nevertheless I enjoyed the article and your advice and hopefully I will pull the trigger and get fitted in the near future.

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      If you do get fit, please let us know how it goes!

      Reply

      Gary

      3 years ago

      I think you can benefit from a fitting, even if it’s for stock equipment. The lifts are changed because the center of gravity is different. It’s an adjustment to get the results not just to add distance. With a fitting you can know your equipment is dialed in and now your game is about you. If a fitting shows your current set up is fine, then you know your equipment is set.

      Reply

      brian wallace

      3 years ago

      Great article! I’ve been through several fittings, both indoors and outdoors, and with individual manufacturer fitters and multi-brand fitters. Each has its advantages and disadvantages. Outdoors you can see ball flight but you’re probably going to be hitting range balls. Indoors you can use your favorite ball but are hitting off of a mat. In all instances, launch monitor data is crucial. My most recent fitting was outdoors for irons only with a specific manufacturer and I left with a set of irons I’m very confident will improve my game. My prior fitting was full bag (indoors with my golf balls) and we were primarily focused on fine tuning the upper portion so I only changed the driver and the hybrid configuration. I am convinced fittings are beneficial and recommend it to anyone wanting to elevate their game.

      Reply

      Bob

      3 years ago

      I buy a 7 iron to demo. Then determine if this is what is necessary to change.
      Yes , after being fitted..

      Reply

      Matthew

      3 years ago

      Great read. I’m a fan of the fitting process. I’ve fallen into all Callaway, for the time being, but have gamed various others over the years (titleist, TM, Wilson, Cobra). I think the point about the individual fitter’s knowledge of both the equipment, and his/her ability to understand swing mechanics enough to bring equipment to the individual golfer is huge. Also, for the better golfers, be sure to ask if they have premium balls to hit with the simulator. It matters! It affects your numbers AND it affects feel/feedback.

      Reply

      THOMAS

      3 years ago

      VERY GOOD INFO CHRIS AND FROM ALL OF YOU.
      I’M CONSIDERING NEW IRONS THIS YEAR. CURRENTLY PLAYING T.AP2 2014. I HAVE BEEN TO SEVERAL DEMO DAYS AND SO FAR I FIND MOST NEW MANUFACTURES SET MAKE UPS, ALL PERFORM WELL WITH LITTLE TO NOT MUCH DIFFERENCE FROM MY CURRENT SET OF AP2. I WAS FITTED FOR MY AP2 IRONS BY OUR LOCAL LONG LONG TIME PRO, NO HIGH TECH EQUIPMENT INVOLVED. JUST HIT AND VISULIZE TRAJECTORY, DISTANCE DISPERSION. SEEMS HE KNEW WHAT HE WAS DOING. THEY CONTINUE TO PERFORM

      Reply

      Frank Duda

      3 years ago

      One of the best fittings I have ever had is with MGS TrueGolfFit for my driver last year. Great fit and excellent performance.

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Crazy how accurate it is, eh? Went through it myself and the two drivers it suggested PXG GEN4 and Cobra RadSpeed are currently in a battle, but getting great numbers from both.

      Reply

      Robin

      3 years ago

      I think it’s important to get a lesson or two before making a big purchase, especially if you’re going to club champion.
      Because you’re wallet will be much lighter afterwards.
      They definitely do over charge.

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      My opinion may differ from others, but unless you’re a pretty decent player with a consistent swing, you’re wasting your time at club champion. A $500 driver with an additional $400 shaft is a ridiculous waste of money for that golfer.

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      I concur wholeheartedly. I’m not sure I would recommend anyone go there, regardless of skill or income level. Srixon has at least 40 different shafts for their Irons that do not require an upcharge, yet for some reason, the fitter couldn’t make any of them work? Give me a break.

      ForeRightAgain

      3 years ago

      Have been fitted for irons 3 times. First was at an independent shop, before launch monitors and the like. Just swing and see how it feels. Grab your set on the way out the door. Then once at a Golf Galaxy with the early edition of launch monitors. Cut my clubs a little since I choked down on the club and put a forward press on it. Loved the irons and the fitting. Now got fitted at a Club Champion. Went in with a blank slate, obviously knew what the new models were, but really wanted to see what the #”s suggested. The fitter asked me about my game. He then walked me through all of the #’s, changed out shafts that didn’t feel right, and then made his suggestion. I’ll find out soon enough if it works out.

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      Chris, how important is it to get fit for irons and wedges on turf versus mats? In my limited experience, I have way better launch monitor numbers hitting irons off of mats versus turf. While I think being fit for irons regardless of the surface is beneficial, I do wonder how much ‘better’ a fitting on turf would be.

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Mike – Great question –

      In general, I don’t think it’s ideal to get fit for irons/wedges indoors. I’m not saying you can’t, but think about it this way – If you had the choice, why would anyone prefer to get fit indoors? I don’t believe they would. In some cases it’s not feasible (weather, time of year) and I totally get that.

      Personally, I wouldn’t invest the money unless I could hit the clubs outside and see how they interact with the turf – That said, it might make less of a difference for golfers with a shallower angle of attack.

      So, is it vital? For wedges, I would lean towards “yes” – For irons, it’s more dependent on the golfer and whether they’ve been fit previously – but still, I have to think the fitting is more accurate outdoors off real turf.

      Reply

      todd

      3 years ago

      I think this point is largely ignored or glossed over. If you have a swing that results in a significant divot, getting fitted for irons indoors is likely to give you bad data. I’ve been fitted for irons twice but now will order a 7i in a spec that I think is close (I know what weight/flex works for me) and then hit it off grass and on the course. I won’t ever do an iron or wedge fitting off a mat as it can do more harm than good.

      Joe

      3 years ago

      My last fitting was at an agnostic fitter, who was well known for fitting college and pro golfers. Before hitting my first shot, he asked three questions, “What do you like to see in a club”, “What gives you confidence?”, and “Why do and don’t you like about the clubs you have now (Titleist AP2). In our conversation he said is philosophy was that, the club needed to pass my own “eye test”, in other words it needed to look like what I liked and would have confidence in. As he said, if he put me in a club strictly off the data and I didn’t like the look, I would never be comfortable hitting with it. That was the best part of the entire fitting, as we could quickly work through clubs that I felt good about vs those that I just couldn’t seem to “like”.

      Reply

      Patrick Butler

      3 years ago

      In my opinion, one of the most important aspects of an iron fitting is how the club bounce/leading edge interact with the turf given your particular swing parameters. Accordingly, I think that it is extremely important that iron fittings be performed off of real grass. If you think the fitting that you got off a matt will provide a true indication of how you will hit that iron on a real golf course, you are kidding yourself and your fitting is a colosal waste of time.. I will agree that hitting off of matts can, to a degree, allow you to judge one iron versus another, but if you really want to make sure that the iron set that you choose will perform on the course, I recommend that you get fit off of real grass. I was surprised that your article did not mention this.

      Reply

      ForeRightAgain

      3 years ago

      Not being a member of a club, it isn’t really feasible for me to be fitted on grass. I don’t trust that the pro at my local muni’s know as much as a club fitter. I’m sure the majority of people being fitted for clubs are in the same boat

      Reply

      Rusty

      3 years ago

      True. this ⬆️…….

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      I don’t disagree, but turf interaction is largely dependent on the golfer – so for some, mats vs. grass will make a huge difference and for others it won’t.

      I’d always prefer to be fit outdoors, but that’s not realistic in all situations.

      Reply

      Dr Tee

      3 years ago

      I don’t see any point to indoor fitting on a mat. There is no substitute for demoing a club on-course during a round of golf or trialing and fitting on a well maintained turf grass range with a launch monitor. As far as I know, for the most part, the game is played on turf, not on mats.

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      Having been to 5 different fitters, to fill out different parts of my bag at different times, in the last 15 years. I’ve had different experiences from all of them. The three experiences that will always stick out:
      1) I was fit indoor, and set up purely on data feedback. At the time I wasn’t happy, but looking back they were the best irons for me, I debate going back to them.
      2) one was an outdoor fitting with irons, fit purely on ball flight no data, and pressured into something I didn’t really love – looking back I regret going with it.
      3) great fitting experience and perfect environment, but had a brand I was not prepared for shoved down my throat.
      I wish I had gone for a second fitting elsewhere, on the two occasions where I felt forced into a brand because the pro staffed the brands (and was adverse to properly testing me in anything else). Lesson learned for future fittings.

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      Those are three really good stories and lessons to be learned from each of them.

      Reply

      Gabriel

      3 years ago

      Hey, is there any place or anyone that can provide a recommendation for a very good brand agnostic fitter in Miami? (or South Florida?)

      This besides the obvious ones (True Spec and Club Champion)

      Reply

      Dennis Whitehead

      3 years ago

      Check out GolfTec. I had a very good fitting experience at the GolfTec in Madison, Wi

      Reply

      Josh

      3 years ago

      With all the data being collected nowadays, I’d like to know what the numbers mean when I go for a fitting. Distance is always a selling factor but I’d like to know what to numbers are telling me.

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Josh – Shoot me a message and I’d be happy to answer any questions you have.

      With an iron fitting – assuming that strokes gained is off the table – you’ll likely be looking at: launch angle, ball speed, peak height, decent angle and carry distance.

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      and spin rate!

      Josh

      3 years ago

      How do I send you a message?

      Pete

      3 years ago

      I think its important to do a fitting after a range session or playing 9 holes. You need to know what the club feels like when you are 13-15 holes deep into round. I did a fitting and picked my shaft and it ended up being too heavy when I actually played with them. Anybody can swing a 135 gram shaft well for 20 swings. how about after 75?

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Pete – Great point. And this is why I think the best fitters have processes in place that allow golfers to change/tweak/modify equipment based on feedback from on-course rounds.

      Getting stuck with equipment that checked all the boxes on a launch monitor or in-studio fitting is great – but that equipment needs to fit you just as well on #`18 when you’re down two presses as well.

      Reply

      Howard Garson

      3 years ago

      I was an independent club fitter, but because of the need for medical insurance for my wife, I now manage the golf department at the local store of a national retailer. I get people calling or coming in for fittings all the time, and my first question is what do you want to accomplish? Not in terms of improving their game, but what do they think a fitting is and does. The vast majority have no clue. They heard from friends or read somewhere that fitting is important when you buy clubs, so they want a fitting. When I explain what a fitting can accomplish and that only clubs in production can be ordered to any specifications and that the older less expensive models would have to be taken to a clubmaker to fit the specs, almost all decline the fitting. As a trained club fitter, I know the value of being fit correctly for a set of clubs, but I also know that a large percentage of golfers are just looking to have fun on the course and don’t want to or can’t afford to pay $2,500+ for a set of clubs. I think the article is informative and accurate as far as it goes. It does leave out a third option, the independent club fitter. A good independent club fitter will have a lot more knowledge and information than chain club fitters. His/her knowledge and access to data bases of shafts and their performance can be much greater than others. If a golfer would do better with a stiff shaft with a more flexible tip or a regular flex with a stiffer tip, and a little lighter or heavier, that information is available. Just being independent does not make a fitter better, but if they are a member of the AGCP (Association of Golf Club Fitting Professionals) or the ICG (International Clubmakers Guild), that is a good start. Independents rely on word of mouth advertising, so getting you in the best performing club, not necessarily the most expensive is paramount.

      Reply

      Allen

      3 years ago

      Where can we find a list or resources pointing us to those independent guys?

      Reply

      LGV

      3 years ago

      There were several good points. The one that people should consider is the blended set idea..

      Having been fitted by different fitters working at different locations, I can say the process can deliver better selections, but not necessarily the optimum selection.

      My Golf Tec fitting provided a limited selection of models and a limited selection of shafts. If all you have is a hammer, then everything looks like a nail. So, the best result is always going to fall within their inventory.

      The other issue I had is that the fitting at Club Champion and their ilk means hitting a million 6 irons of different models and with different shafts. The result will be the selection of the perfect 6 iron at best. My last iron set based off results from the 6 iron fitting ended up with me having pitching and gap wedges I hated.

      The pros blend in more forgiveness on longer irons. We mediocre golfers should consider blending in less game improvement in our short irons.

      Reply

      Jimmy

      3 years ago

      Great article about fittings and I really do want to get fitted for my next set of irons and see the benefits but I have a few hesitations that makes me want to buy a stock set and take my chances especially since I am not trying to make it on Tour or playing in any real serious amateur tournaments. First hesitation is what if the day I go and get fitted is the day that I start doing something in my swing that I haven’t done before and then I get fitted for clubs to cure that slice or hook or fade etc. Like anything in golf you have one day where you are hitting the ball with a baby draw and cannot miss the fairways or greens and then there are other days where where you can’t hit a side of a barn. So my logic would say shouldn’t you go and get fitted multiple times and then look for tendencies in your swing and see what can be done to achieve your goal(s) before deciding what lie angle or shaft should be used? But then that drives up your cost big time. Second hesitation of why I am hesitant to get fitted is because the fitter cannot replicate my current setup to do a true baseline comparison. Currently I play with jumbomax grips there is a 99.9% chance that most fitters will not have shafts already gripped with my current grip. So again how do I know if the jumbomax grips with a new shaft is still a good fit or I need to switch to a new grip because I can’t compare. So at $150 to $200 a fitting session that is a lot for a service that might not truely benefit me because I cannot get real comparison data or I don’t want to spend for three fittings to get get real average numbers and tendencies.

      Reply

      Ray

      3 years ago

      For a 66 year old with a 20 handicap that once in a while can shoot 85, bad days hits 105, how can a fitting help for an inconsistent player? Ya never know which golfer gonna show up on fitting day. Asking for a friend. Lol

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Ray – Great question and one we get quite often. I’d argue that the inconsistent golfer might actually benefit more from a fitting than some others. Every golfer is inconsistent to varying degrees. So, the challenge is to start limiting or eliminating variables as quickly as possible. More skilled golfers can play “around” poorly fit equipment b/c they more refined skills. Less accomplished golfers simply can’t do that.

      Once you can check equipment off the “variables list” then you can assess other parts of your game to see what you might want to tackle next.

      Reply

      Brad Fellinger

      3 years ago

      Ray
      1st your friend needs to understand when you walk into a big box store they look at your age and have already decided what you need. An independant qualified club fitter does not do that, at least i hope not, most of us that are qualified and have knowledge about club fitting and shaft flex. First we look at your present equipment to determine what you are actually playing for flex. Far too many times golfers believe what flex is written on the shaft is what they are hitting, that is the biggest mistake in the golf industry and that is why if you walk into a fitting or a golf shop that does not own a frequency machine you need to leave. A frequency machine will determine the flex of your clubs and is my first step in the fitting process and have a graph that I use to show you visually what you are playing.
      From that point i can start building you a more consistent golf game. Testing shafts weights and flexes, even reshafting one of your present clubs during the fitting process, I can guarantee that you will improve your consistency, control and accuracy which is key to lowering your
      scores and handicap thru one of my fittings. The shaft flex is the issue preventing the amatuer golfer from improving their skills.

      Reply

      Mark

      3 years ago

      Great article Chris. The comment “Does the difference in price justify the potential difference in performance?” is the most important part here. Just because the Mizuno shaft optimizer tells you which shafts should be best for you, you should test the club you decide on with that shaft vs. the brand’s stock shaft and THEN decide if the $30-50 per iron upcharge is worth it. Gains of a few yards and or RPMs of spin may not be worth the extra $300+. That’s money that could buy another club.

      Reply

      WYBob

      3 years ago

      What would be really valuable is if MGS could do a “Best Fitter” review similar to what you do for drivers, irons, etc. As a consumer, it is difficult to determine which fitter would be the best for the objective I set, and for where which part of the country I live. You hear horror stories all the time about sub-par fittings and wasted money. Granted it would be a monumental undertaking, but of real value, to your reader base (especially since MGS advocates fitting as part of the club purchasing decision).

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Yep, I hear ya! We hear a lot of the horror stories, but there are plenty of great fitters out there as well. The challenge – as you suggest – is quantifying it in a way that’s helpful to all golfers. Let us do some thinking on this and see what we might be able to do. If you have any specific ideas/requests, please send them over!

      Reply

      Brian

      3 years ago

      Would love to see the comparisons that single golfer would get from a few of the different fitting processes (in their region of the country) Should be very similar set make ups and similar shafts if not the same. Theoretically also will help answer some of the questions around what if I’m swinging the club different days x and y and how big a change will that make to the fitters selection

      WYBob

      3 years ago

      Chris: a place to potentially start is to survey your readers similar to the Golfers Choice Survey MGS just conducted. From your article, and the aforementioned survey, you have a pretty good start on the type of questions to ask. Key additional questions could be if you would go back for another fitting, did you take their recommendation and how did it work out on the course, did you feel the fees charged were fair, did it improve your GHIN index and by how much, etc.? You could present the resulting data and use similar metrics to the Golfers Choice Survey for the first go at this. Just some random thoughts from the fringe…

      James

      3 years ago

      My son is a highly competitive Junior golfer, a +3 handicap, and has gone through several fitting sessions. Turns out he is best at fitting himself more than any fitter. He gets on the club Trackman and uses the fitting carts and finds what works best in terms of looks, feel, distance, distance control and dispersion. ALL the fitters would focus solely on the distance component. To play well, dispersion, consistency, spin, etc, must also be considered. Longest club is not always the best club in irons or driver for that matter. Distance control and trajectory is what my son says is critical to him. Fit himself in Titleist T100S irons with Project X 6.5 shaft and GIRs went up significantly. He recently did a driver and ended up with TSi4 because trajectory and launch was spot on for him and it was tightest dispersion.

      Reply

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