Titleist Ball Fitting – Case Studies
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Titleist Ball Fitting – Case Studies

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Titleist Ball Fitting – Case Studies

Titleist Ball Fitting

Why should I get fitted for a golf ball?

It’s a fair question and one most golfers likely don’t spend enough time pondering. The myriad answers start to get at what is a very simple and, at times, nuanced situation.

The most basic and applicable thinking is that the ball is the only piece of equipment you use on every shot.

More detailed fittings might involve specific-use cases, such as 7-iron peak height, player-preferred spin around the greens, long-iron descent angle … Those sorts of situations.

Moreover, the decision point between two balls with relatively equal performance is highly individualized and often has less to do with driver distance.

With that, we put 14 players through a premium ball fitting at Independence Golf Club in Richmond, Va.

While each fitting was as unique as the player, several trends emerged. Perhaps the most important was that every golfer, regardless of skill, playing experience or style of play, can benefit from a fitting.

CASE STUDIES

Titleist Ball Fitting

Fitting Summary

Bennett ended up in the Titleist Pro V1x largely due to its higher trajectory throughout the bag and steeper descent angle with her irons. The Pro V1x did feel slightly firmer around the greens. However, feel isn’t always indicative of greenside spin as was the case with Bennett where the Pro V1x performed similarly to her previous ball.

Fitting Summary

Steve is natively a low-launch/low-spin player. So, the high-launch and -spin characteristics of Pro V1x help him find optimal launch/spin conditions throughout the bag. However, with the driver, both Pro V1 and Pro V1x generated nearly identical launch/ball speeds. With a flighted 75-yard wedge shot, Steve generated 6,500 to 7,000 rpm of spin and a 46-degree descent angle with the Pro V1x. Comparing 7-iron data, the Pro V1 generated 5,400 rpm of spin, a peak height of 68 feet and a 40-degree landing angle. The Pro V1x had less spin (6,000 rpm) and a 41-degree landing angle.

Steve’s case is a good example of where finding a ball that offsets your natural tendencies can lead to better performance. If you tend to hit the ball too high with too much spin, consider starting your search with balls that are designed as low launch/low spin and vice versa. 

Fitting Summary

Ryan is a professional golfer competing on mini-tours and PGA TOUR Latino America. He won the 2021 Iowa State Open with a score of  -19. Although the Pro V1 and Pro V1 Left Dot generated nearly identical numbers, Ryan prefers the slightly higher-spin Pro V1 as he is more comfortable taking spin/trajectory off by altering his swing as opposed to trying to add spin/launch. In reviewing 7-iron data, the Pro V1 generated 6,900 rpm of spin, a peak height of 105 feet, a 50-degree descent angle and a carry distance of 176 yards. Comparatively, the Pro V1 Left Dot produced 6,800 rpm of spin, a peak height of 102 feet, a 49.5-degree descent angle and a carry distance of 177 yards.

Fitting Summary

Charlie is the archetypal example of why every golfer should be fitted for a ball. He believed his prior ball (Srixon Soft Feel) was better suited to his game because of its “soft” characteristics, namely that a lower-compression, softer ball provided him with more spin around the greens and increased distance off the tee. Based on Trackman data, Charlie generated longer carry off his driver and significantly more greenside spin from the higher-compression Pro V1x. Underlying Charlie’s entire experience was his belief that he didn’t have the necessary swing speed to play a “premium” ball.

Fitting Summary

Tom is a typical amateur golfer who fights too much spin throughout the bag. He tends to have a slightly steep, over-the-top swing that produces a strong left-to-right (fade) ball flight. Titleist AVX is a low-spin option. However, it still launched too low for Tom. Pro V1x Left Dash offered Tom the low-spin characteristics of the AVX but with a higher overall flight and descent angle (45 degrees) than AVX.

Fitting Summary

Adam is an accomplished amateur golfer and needs to optimize performance for the course conditions he plays most often. Tournament courses are often set up with firm and fast greens and ultimately this is where the Pro V1 won out over Pro V1x Left Dash.  Given a 65-yard pitch shot, Pro V1 produced more spin than Pro V1x Left Dash (8,000 rpm versus 7,500 rpm). Additionally, Pro V1 produced a steeper landing angle (49 degrees) as compared to Pro V1x Left Dash (44-45 degrees). Moreover, Adam was pleased the Pro V1 didn’t give up any ball speed off the driver as compared to the Pro V1x Left Dash.

Fitting Summary

Chris is a high-flight, high-spin player. As expected, Pro V1 and Pro V1 Left Dot helped bring down the ball flight. Initially, Pro V1x Left Dash presented some intriguing options but still generated a higher-than-optimal flight. Comparing Pro V1 and Pro V1 Left Dot, the latter offered a slightly lower flight but a bit more spin on partial wedge shots and around the green. Comparing 7-iron data, the Pro V1 generated 6,900 rpm of spin, a peak height of 105 feet and a 51-degree landing angle. The Pro V1 Left Dot had less spin (6,600 rpm), a peak height of 96 feet and a 48-degree landing angle.

Fitting Summary

Sometimes, through trial and error, a golfer can find a ball that is an ideal fit. In this case, Ryan’s fitting data confirmed that the ball he’d been playing (Pro V1) was still the best fit for his game. On a 70-yard shot, the Pro V1  produced 6,800 rpm, a peak height of 57 feet and a 51-degree landing angle. With his 7-iron, Pro V1 produced 6,900 rpm of spin, a peak height of 94 feet and a 48-degree descent angle. If anything, Ryan might benefit from slightly less spin off his driver (2,800 rpm). However, combined with a peak height of 98 feet and a 39-degree landing angle, he is well within a workable window.

The message here is that a golfer doesn’t always need to change equipment in order for a fitting to be beneficial.

Fitting Summary

Phillip is typically a low-trajectory and-low spin player. As such, the additional spin delivered by the Pro V1x increased his 8-iron peak height (81 feet) and descent angle (46 degrees). Phillip also found similar increased distance and playability with his driver for the same reasons, namely a higher overall trajectory as a result of additional spin

As with several other players, finding a ball with characteristics that oppose your natural flight/spin tendencies is often going to yield performance benefits. Players may fight certain launch conditions for a variety of reasons. For Phillip, his prosthetic leg can make it difficult to generate spin and height on some shots.

Fitting Summary

Chris felt the primary weakness in his game is a lack of sufficient peak height with his long irons. Interestingly enough, Chris generated PGA TOUR-level ball speed with his 4-iron (137 mph) but his landing angle (42 degrees) is six degrees less than the Tour average of 48 degrees. The Pro V1x increased both spin (350 rpm) and landing angle (46 degrees) for Chris. It also gave him access to a wider variety of shots around the green. For some golfers, the decision point between two balls can be a single type or category of shot.

Fitting Summary

Harry recently turned pro and competes in various local and regional professional events. If anything, Harry has a tendency to create too much spin with short irons and not enough spin with chips and pitches. The Pro V1x launched too high with too much spin off the irons and the Pro V1x Left Dash didn’t spin enough around the greens. That left Pro V1 and Pro V1 Left Dot. Ultimately, Left Dot performed marginally better on short irons while producing noticeably more spin on short chips and pitches. With the driver, Harry’s most common miss is a spinny, high-right block. The Pro V1 Left Dot generated slightly less spin (2,200 rpm) and peak height (five feet lower) than Pro V1 on well-struck tee shots. As a result, the Pro V1 Left Dot helped produce a “better” driver miss for Harry.

Fitting Summary

Jimmy is probably more like the majority of golfers than many of our testers. Prior to this fitting, he played a variety of balls without any real understanding of which ball might be best suited to his game. The reality is that the real “#1 ball in golf” is likely still whatever a golfer finds in his/her bag or abandoned in a penalty area. Regardless, most golfers are in the “you don’t know what you don’t know” category of players. In this case, Jimmy didn’t have much experience using spin to help him control greenside chips and pitches or understand how a ball with a softer, thinner cover (Pro V1) could potentially improve his short game. Jimmy initially gravitated toward the Titleist AVX primarily as a result of its soft feel. However, Jimmy generated more spin (4,425 rpm versus 4,050) on partial wedge shots with the Pro V1. Additionally, the Pro V1 produced a higher trajectory and more optimal descent angle with his short irons.

Fitting Summary

Sometimes a fitting adheres to Voltaire’s line of thinking that “Perfect is the enemy of good.” More specifically, sometimes the best ball is the one with the fewest drawbacks. While neither launch/spin combination is by-the-book ideal, the Pro V1 offered more spin on irons and around the green while maintaining sufficient distance off the driver. With the 7-iron, Pro V1 produced 6,500 rpm of spin and a 35-degree landing angle. Comparatively, Pro V1x Left Dash generated less spin (6,100 rpm) but a steeper landing angle (38 degrees).

Fitting Summary

Jonathan is a former collegiate golfer who relies heavily on short-game performance to shoot low scores. As expected, Jonathan prefers a ball with more spin around the greens and off his wedges. With the exception of AVX, the other models he tested (V1, V1x, V1x Left Dash) all produced sufficient spin for his needs. Jonathan’s 7-iron data with the Pro V1x (6,500 rpm, a peak height of 79 feet and a 44-degree landing angle) suggest he could benefit from additional launch and spin to maximize distance. However, the Pro V1x is already the highest-launching/-spinning offering in Titleist’s lineup and generates a playable combination of peak height and descent angle for Jonathan.

Titleist Ball Fitting

WHERE DO WE GO NOW?

Testing is an organic process. Each time we ask a question, some answers surprise us while others confirm or contradict previously held beliefs or popular marketing messages. With that, here are five key takeaways from this experience.

#1. Every golfer, regardless of skill level, can benefit from a ball fitting.

#2. The ball you’re playing right now is likely NOT the best fit for your game.

#3. There isn’t a single ball that is best for every player—or for every shot.

#4. Don’t let “better” be the enemy of “optimal”.

#5. When in doubt, err towards the ball with more launch/spin.

MY $.05

We get that the majority of golfers who can benefit from a ball fitting likely don’t have access to a Tour-level experience. Ball companies understand this reality as well. To that end, Titleist offers a virtual fitting option with the same staff that performs the on-site fittings. Bridgestone launched its VFIT app in 2017 and most ball manufactures have some version of a self-guided online fitting tool as well. Additionally, we know plenty of you are DIY-type golfers. If that’s you, stay tuned for our self-fitting checklist.

As more golfers come to realize the performance benefits of playing the correct ball, it will be intriguing to see how the industry responds. Perhaps we will see more conglomerate fitting engines such as PING’s Ballnamic tool ($39). Or maybe individual manufacturers will move forward with various strategies and brand-specific proprietary products.

What do you think? What would you like to see?

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Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

Chris is a self-diagnosed equipment and golf junkie with a penchant for top-shelf ice cream. When he's not coaching the local high school team, he's probably on the range or trying to keep up with his wife and seven beautiful daughters. Chris is based out of Fort Collins, CO and his neighbors believe long brown boxes are simply part of his porch decor. "Isn't it funny? The truth just sounds different."

Chris Nickel

Chris Nickel

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      Dave Orzechowicz

      2 years ago

      I had a virtual ball fitting (via Zoom) with Titleist in October. We talked my game, what I look for in a ball, and Trackman data that I had saved from the summer. It was a pleasant process, and I ended up having the ProV1x as my recommended ball. In a week or so, I received 4 of them to try.

      Today, out of nowhere, I received a half-dozen of protptype 2022 AVXs, marked “TEST” within the alignment markers where “AVX” would normally be. Titleist asked that I compare them with my current ball (Snell MTB-X) and get back to them. I feel bad that all that I am going to be able to report is some indoor Trackman data, but still, a very cool surprise.

      Reply

      Mark T.

      2 years ago

      I’d be more interested in an independent ball fitting. Having this done by Titleist is no different than the ball fitting that Bridgestone has done. Ironically enough, they said I should be playing a Bridgestone RXS over a ProV1. Regardless of which ball manufacturing company does the fitting, it will ALWAYS come out that their ball is the best one for you.

      Reply

      JP

      2 years ago

      Thought this was a super interesting read Chris, comments are wild – so much hate ha! I think the key here is that all these players had a preferred ball prior to the fitting (except 1 guy). And that is critical to knowing your base line.

      Choose a ball you like, play only that for one entire season then decide, “what would I like to see change in my ball performance.” And start fitting.

      This year for Christmas I am getting my brother half a dozen of a bunch of different balls bc he desperately needs to find what works best for him. This will allow him to do his own “fitting”

      His gamers are Vice Pro and TP5 but heres what im getting him to test: Maxfli Tour and Tour X, Vice Pro & Pro Plus, ProV 1 left dash (don’t love him enough to give up any of my left dot), Chrome Soft X LS, it’s not everything under the sun, but it’s direct to consumer balls, budget friendly balls, and major OEM unique offerings.

      Best part is I will be taking the other half of the dozens and doing the same! (Only difference is I have a launch monitor and sim at work, so I can really get dialed in!)

      Reply

      Julius Curie

      3 years ago

      Hi Chris.
      I am confused at the ‘fitting’, as my swing changed a lot every year.
      For example, my handicap dropped from 18 to 13 in 2021.
      Then how often should I do the fitting? Every year? Or depending on the handicap?

      Reply

      Alex

      3 years ago

      Not sure what the point is of fitting someone with a ball that is impossible to purchase consistently (ie., Left Dot and Left Dash). Seems kind of cruel to me: “Good news! We’ve found your perfect ball. Bad news: you’ll have to join the Tour in order for Titleist to supply it to you.”

      Reply

      Bodeen

      3 years ago

      Im in agreement with the comments below that its pretty easy to figure out the ball that works for you on your own . In my case I play both Prov1 and Prov1x depending on green speed , wind , etc I will choose one or the other . I have played TP5 and TP5x the same way .and they are great balls too . Price should not be a issue … I generally buy 5A condition ProV1 golf balls on ebay for 25-30 bucks a dozen with great success .

      Reply

      Jonathan

      3 years ago

      What I would like to see is an in-person ball fitting. I have done the virtual ball fitting and it was ok but it was missing the in person feeling and seeing all that goes into ball fitting.

      Reply

      Jonathan R

      3 years ago

      When fitting your ball, start at the hole and work backwards, since it’s the closest shots that we have most control of scoring. So that being said, I would think that one should start with putting and then move to chipping, pitching, approaches, Driving. Seems like the assumption is that with putting you’ll have just as good a result with one ball as another, but that would seem to be just as likely to be a misconception with putting as it would be for every other type of shot. And, the only way to really know is to use the same scientific, data/results-driven process as is being advocated for all other types of shots. So, for the ideal ball-fitting, the first step would be to hit a bunch of putts with the various ball options and then look at the strokes-gained stat. That would then factor into the overall decision process along with all the other stats with the other shot types.

      Reply

      Rob

      3 years ago

      “If anything, Ryan might benefit from slightly less spin off his driver (2,800 rpm). However, combined with a peak height of 98 feet and a 39-degree landing angle, he is well within a workable window.”

      That’s why most fitters tell you to fit the ball to your short game and irons and then fit the fairway woods and drivers to the ball. Its much easier to shed some spin and add launch with adjustable fairway woods and drivers then try and add spin and control with your irons and wedges..

      Reply

      George

      3 years ago

      Seems to me that golf ball fitting should be a 2 step process. I can’t believe that major custom golf club custom fitters do not offer ball fitting. They have the resources.. For a fee they should be able to discuss with you your current ball, golf game and your expectations. Then allow you to hit your ball and compare it to other golf balls that may fit your profile.. Then take the top 3 performers or so, buy a sleeve of each and go play a few rounds/practice and choose the one you perform the best with.

      Reply

      Michael Bodnar

      3 years ago

      Chris: It seems that neither the case studies nor any of the posts address what is the biggest challenge for me. I am 76 and a 17 at my home course. I feel that my main challenge (for ball and club fitting) is the inconsistency of my swing. I can take 5 swings with the same ball and get perhaps 3 different results. Try a completely different ball and get the same variety of results. Try 3 more balls and get like return information. So, which of the 5 balls is best for me? .I have no idea!

      Reply

      Luc Lacoursiere

      3 years ago

      Is it possible to get a ball fitting that would include many brands? Titleist, Srixon, Taylormade, etc? I did the virtual fitting for Titleist and they of course recommended the Pro V1X. But how could I know if that is the best ball for me? How could I test it against other brands? It would be really expensive to buy the premium balls from every brands. And I don’t have a GC quad either…

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Hi Luc – I think that’s hopefully where this conversation is headed. No doubt, it’s an opportunity for the outlets that can figure out how to do it effectively and efficiently. We are also working on some tools to help golfers narrow down the selection given the monetary barriers to entry, which you note.

      Reply

      Patrick

      3 years ago

      You asked, “What would you like to see?”

      I’d love to see some sample instructions for a DIY ball fitting. I’m sure many of us have or can get access to a Trackman (even if it means paying for an hour at a local simulator). What are a couple of things/numbers we should be looking at when testing balls? Obviously spin rates, but what else would be the first 2 or 3 numbers/values you would look at? Obviously ball fitting is never going to be “one size fits all,” but a simple guide would be a helpful place to start, I’d think. Said another way, what are the first few characteristics you look at during a full (if not “Tour-level”) ball fitting?

      Thanks!

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Hi Patrick,

      Stay tuned as we’re working on some DIY fitting tools. That said, if I had an hour on a Trackman and no real idea where to start, I’d likely want to look at driver, 7-iron and wedges to see if any of the numbers are really out of whack. From there, it’s a matter of understanding your game and assessing where the “biggest bang for the buck” might be. I get that’s a pretty non-specific answer, but feel free to shoot me an email at [email protected] and I’d be happy to discuss further.

      Reply

      Greg

      3 years ago

      Good analysis by Titleist . Always interested in what they say. and what comments that come from your readers.
      The ball is like your car so it of no use fitting truck tyres to your sports car.
      The ball is the biggest single benifit you can make on improving your scores.
      We all get that (well maybe not the longer marker ) and this is good advice to them.
      I would also like to point out that if you dont balance the tyres you will have enormous problems controlling the steering even with the best tyre fitting.
      The sooner these companies give a quality check and fit alignment marks for balance to their expensive balls the better for all of us.
      I have done my checks and you would be surprised at what you get..
      I would take my own balanced ball to any fitter and then see if they can beat the ball you like. Makes sense don’t you think.
      If I can find quality balls out of balance and they test you with their own balls that are balanced so what would you think then.
      A BALL THAT IS OUT OF BALANCE CANNOT GO STRAIGHT LIKE YOU CAR.
      All the quality checks you do on balls you leave out the most important feature to be checked.. Lets get fairdinkum and really see the right price for a ball..
      I for one will pay extra for a balanced ball.

      Reply

      John

      3 years ago

      How could any golf ball manufacturer sell balanced balls? How would you determine a balanced ball at the production level when you’re making & selling anywhere from 10 Million to 25 Million dozen balls per year?
      This has to be one of the dumbest comments I’ve ever read.

      Reply

      Art

      3 years ago

      John, your ignorance makes for a good laugh. Maxfli Tour balls are CG balanced. If one company can do it, you think maybe others could? Thanks for one of the dumbest “this has to one of the dumbest” comments I’ve ever read.

      Steven

      3 years ago

      I would recommend if you have a golf buddy with a launch monitor, meet with him on the on the golf course and hit several different makes of balls from various distances. You’ll learn a lot. Personally, I found I get the same distance and spin, as the ProV1, with the Kirkland V.2 ball, but each player is different.

      Reply

      Gene

      3 years ago

      I agree with Joe, above…being 72, 15-18 hcp on a fixed income, price is of some issue, along with my limited swing arc and speed. Being this isn’t the first time I’ve seen the benefits of Pro V1’s I’m going to try them to see if I BENEFIT enough to justify the cost.

      Reply

      Joe Domill

      3 years ago

      not enough high handicap players and older players who swing and have some other difficulties.. Also not enough of high handicapers balls they use.

      Reply

      Miguel

      3 years ago

      I don’t know but in the last year two years my handicap has been floating from 10 to 7 and I have been using golf balls from TP5x to Srixon Z Star to Srixon Soft Feel and Taylormade Project S. All I noticed was the spin with the wedges around the green. In the long game department, everything seems to be the same. This year I will try the PROV1 and see if there will be any significant improvement.

      Reply

      Grasper Parsnip

      3 years ago

      Hi, it depends what you want from the ball, the longest premium ball with a driver is the Taylormade tp5 x, the most spinning ball and the most accurate dispersion with a wedge is the Prov 1 x.
      This matters most to Pro players and top amatuers, for most golfers we do not need this kind of precise performance from the ball as we strike it too inconsitently for the ball to matter that much..
      At the end of the day it comes down to what we can afford to knife into a lake 2 or 3 times per round.
      The Srixon ad333 is in my opinion the best ball for most average golfers to play, great value, good distance off the tee and great spin around the greens..

      Reply

      Tim

      3 years ago

      A more important result may be following the handicap changes for golfers after they switch to a ball they were fitted for.

      Reply

      Chuck G Ross

      3 years ago

      Agree , when a OEM gives a fitting , AKA Ball fitting they are not going
      to say anything else but what that offer. If that is what someone wanted
      to change to , then great .
      Many will benefit from a ball or balls change, but in this case , it is not the whole story.

      Paul Harvey

      Good Day

      Reply

      Will

      3 years ago

      Looks like most MGS readers are better golfers than me (10.2), probably younger (74) and higher speed (85). Last March with snow on the ground and covid all over I spent 2 hours on a sim and did my own ball test reviewing 9 balls that various golf mags recommended for us old guys. distance, spin, etc considered. Results showed #1. Snell MTB Black; 2. Wilson DuoSoft-29 and 3. Titleist Pro V1-Left Dash. Odd mix but numbers are what they are.

      Reply

      John

      3 years ago

      You are in my demographics. After trying a number of balls, I’ve found that there is always more than one that fits me well. I can play the Bridgestone e12 Contact, Maxfli Tour, and Vice Pro Soft. Currently, I’m finding that the Vice Pro Soft is working best so I keep it in the bag.

      Reply

      Michael Agishian

      3 years ago

      In my 6 years of golfing. I’m addicted and obsessed with getting. I’ve tried what seems like nearly everything. For me Titleist prov1x works best for me. Wasn’t a ball fitting but I compared them at GOLFTEC to the mizuno range balls they use on the gc quad. I’d get about 10-15 yards more yards on my irons AND a lot more spin.

      Reply

      John

      3 years ago

      You’re going to get 10-15 yards more with any ball type when comparing them to range balls. Durability is #1 with range balls, not spin, not distance, and certainly not feel or sound.

      Reply

      David West

      3 years ago

      According to the USGA, the Average Handicap Index for men is 14.2. Your test had 1 person with a 15, 5 with 0 or less, and 1 Pro. Your testers had an average handicap of ~3.6. Based on this, to me it is difficult to conclude that “Every golfer, regardless of skill level, can benefit from a ball fitting.”

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      David – One of the common objections to ball fittings (and fittings in general) is that “I”m not good enough.”

      Higher-handicap golfers don’t have the same skill set as better players in order to overcome poorly fit equipment, which includes the ball. In fact, one could probably argue that there”s potentially more benefit for higher HCP players than lower HCP players.

      Maybe the other way to ask the question is, “which golfer can’t benefit from a fitting?”

      Reply

      Grasper Parsnip

      3 years ago

      Any golfer that strikes the ball consistently most of the time will no doubt benefit from a ball fitting..
      Most weekend golfers never hit the ball exactly the same twice in a row so what ball they use is mostly irellevant, cost comes into play as it can get expensive hitting balls into ponds , lakes and out of bounds, lol..

      Mike

      3 years ago

      So the takeaway that I’m seeing here is that virtually everyone (at least that’s what the fitting result showed) should play some form of Pro V1? . Sure, let’s let every 20 handicapper spend oodles of money on Pro v1’s…..great if you have an unlimited golf budget. And assuming they don’t know how to hit pitches & chips properly, a $4.25 Pro V1 probably won’t help lower scores at all (lessons would!).

      Unfortunately most places offer ball fitting as a very last afterthought, probably because there’s so much money to be made on clubs.

      So how do I get this specialized ball testing? Forget the virtual apps, those things are so generic it’s almost laughable. And even if one is decent, how do I compare brand vs brand? There are many factors in ball selection & YES,, price is one of them (usually a big one for most non-competitive golfers).

      That’s why I think while these articles mean well, you have to read past most of the wordage & pick your takeaways from them carefully. For me the emphasis on picking a ball & sticking with it makes great sense. I’ve played rounds where for testing sake, I hit a both Pro V & a Titleist Tour soft. Definitely noticed the difference, especially when putting (which really surprised me).. well so, you’ll drive yourself crazy looking for perfection in terms of a ball. Pick the one that you feel works the best for you & stick with it for a season. Then evaluate.

      Reply

      TK

      3 years ago

      I totally agree. If it works, don’t fix it! I play a premium ball and you know what works, right? It’s all individual.

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Mike,

      A couple of thoughts. First, the primary takeaway is hopefully that ball fitting is something that can benefit pretty much every golfer. It’s not that every golfer is best served by a Pro V1 (or Pro V1 variant).

      No doubt, every brand is going to advocate that it can fit every golfer into one of its premium balls. But as much as this article focuses on Titleist’s approach to ball fitting, the key takeaways ( listed and numbered for you) apply to all golfers/brands.

      With that, we get that not every golfer who wants to be fit for a ball will have access to this sort of fitting. This is precisely why companies provide different options and not all are nearly as generic as you suggest. My advice would be to check them out and see if any resonate with you. In addition, we’re creating some ball fitting guides to give golfers a proven structure to help make a more informed decision.

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      Chris, thanks for the response back. Definitely agree that consistently playing the “right” ball will benefit many golfers. But I’m a 14 index & I’ve struggled to see differences between the premium offerings of different brands (when I say “premium” I mean urethane covers, because I found surlyn balls just don’t react well around the greens). But most golf shops around me offer tons of club fittings but not ball fittings (I’ve even offered to bring my own balls for the testing!). So I have to use my own subjective judgment. I’m happy in terms of narrowing it down to 2 or 3 balls that I feel play very similar. Perhaps this offseason I’ll find someplace in my area where I can do a detailed ball-fitting.

      Alex

      3 years ago

      I was playing the 2019 yellow Pro V1 (4 for 3 deal) and was shooting well with it. Experimented with the 2020 AVX the last few months because I get killed teeing into a head wind– and I swing slowly anyways. . My handicapped dropped a stroke, although I was generally striking it better as well. I’d be curious which is truly better for me. The Titleist online ball fitter alternates between the Pro V1 and AVX, depending on what I desire more at the time (green side spin, higher loft, etc)

      Reply

      MarkM

      3 years ago

      This doesn’t work for me unless I can see what their previous Non-Titleist ball did in comparison to the Titleist chosen.
      Just curious are there any non-denominational ball fittings done by anyone? Every one I’ve done, say on a demo day at a course, was one company’s offerings only (Bridgestone, Titleist, etc.).

      Reply

      norebound29

      3 years ago

      Its obvious from my off season reading that I am well overdue for a ball fitting. I’ve done club fittings through Golftec but have never been fit for the ball. And yes, I am one of those fading 10 handicappers who is forever playing around with different balls trying to find what works best, but I am largely flailing. Help!!!

      Reply

      bob

      3 years ago

      All golfers in this fitting then went to a Bridgestone ball fitting facility and were fit for various iterations of their lineup of balls.

      Actually, a few people skipped that fitting and ended up at a Srixon facility and were amazingly all fit with the Z Star and Z Star X models to best suit their swings.

      Reply

      Glenn

      3 years ago

      My ball fitting while not scientific has lead me to a ProV1X. I have played almost every ball I have found for at least one hole. I think feel is the first indicator, then watching the ball flight, then the run out on the green. I have never liked the feel of the ProV1 but played it quite a bit because of relatively good results. Then I found and played the ProV1X. I have never looked back. Two rounds in the 70’s and I have never looked back.
      I have never found or played a Left -, so I did buy a box of them at the end of the year. Will be played next year.

      Reply

      John

      3 years ago

      Just look at the percentage of players on the PGA Tour, and more importantly, college players and younger, the majority are playing PRO V1 & PRO V1X, and you’re not going to tell me that pros are willing to sacrifice wins, and FedEx cup points awarded weekly based on where you are on the leader board just so they can sign a contract to play a ball that doesn’t perform as well. Not every PGA Tour player is getting paid to play V1 & V1x with 5 & 10 year contracts.
      Let’s see how Keopka does now that he’s signed with Srixon and won’t be playing Titleist without be paid at all, and remember what’s happened to Rickie Fowler since leaving PRO V1 after 20 years and playing Taylormade PIX, more missed cuts, no wins, and he missed the Masters, and the FedEx Cup playoffs since switching.

      Reply

      Johnny Penso

      3 years ago

      Taylormade (2), Callaway (2), Bridgestone & Srixon have won the last six majors.

      HAC

      3 years ago

      Have you guys reviewed PING’s Ballnamic tool? Are there any big box stores (or the like) that do ball fittings that you would recommend?

      Reply

      William

      3 years ago

      This really is ridiculous. If you are going to publish a ball fitting story, the fitting should be truly independent. I play every Pro V1x I can find but I am not going to pay $50 a box or even the buy 3 get 1 free deals in the spring. So maybe a ball fitting in the $30 range is better suited for an article. Would a Snell Black or Maxfli Tour ever come out on top at a Titleist facility ? Doubt it.

      Reply

      Bob

      3 years ago

      What a clown. So you admit the ProV is the best ball as you love to find them for free and play them, but penny pinch when it comes to buying. Good luck shooting 120 with your top flite rocks!

      John

      3 years ago

      William, how many PGA Tour Pros are playing Snell or Maxfli balls?

      MGoBlue100

      3 years ago

      I think it’s been pretty clearly proven that getting fitted for a ball is as important as being fitted for clubs. Even if you’re not going to play a premium ($$) ball, do your own research and at least play the SAME ball every time if you’d like to see repeatable results.

      Reply

      Matt Gomez

      3 years ago

      Most interesting but I would have love to seen a real hacker in the group a 20 or higher handicapper. Those of us who lose balls on a regular basis. ???? Would we come out with the recommendation of value box Precept Laddie?

      All kidding aside. I love these case studies MGS does. This can hopefully give the impetus for golf ball manufacturers to make fittings more readily available.

      Oh, and Chris, on the ice cream front. Ben & Jerry’s One Love needs to be brought back. ????????

      Reply

      Dave R.

      3 years ago

      I’m sorry, but this is a little ridiculous for most golfers. If you’re a single digit handicapper, maybe, but for the rest of us, no. I play at least 20 different balls during a season just to see what is best for me and I find that I have good results with at least half to 2/3 of them. It’s easy to tell on your own what works for you and what doesn’t … you don’t need a “fitting” to tell you what ball(s) are best for you.

      Reply

      Chet

      3 years ago

      What Dave said.

      Reply

      Chet

      3 years ago

      I tend to agree. Not only that, but it’s a Titleist Ball Fitting. So, everyone ends up in a Titleist Pro-V1 at the end.

      Reply

      Everardo

      3 years ago

      Good results yes but measured? On course, even when recording shots there are several that can work for me. I’m a mid-handicap player and I like the idea of taking away any variables by switching brands or models often. I guess the key to the fitting is just making sure you have the best possible setup and taking it from there.

      Reply

      Johnny Penso

      3 years ago

      Absolutely. I’ve shot my best rounds ever with balls that I should not play including the uber cheap Wilson Elite 50, Wilson Duo Soft Plus, Taylormade Rocketballz etc. When you’re not a single digit handicapper most of your results come down to strike. A $4 ball & a $1 have the same result when you fat a ball or mishit it out of a bunker. Well struck balls with your normal trajectory tend to produce good results not matter which ball you use. Everything stops on a dime with wedges, even cheap balls.

      Reply

      Kevin Seroski

      3 years ago

      Hey Chris. Where do they do in person ball fittings?

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Kevin – At this point, my understanding is that Titleist will look to set up similar ball fitting opportunities throughout the US based on course/fitter availability.

      Best course of action would be to ask your local pro and see if they’d be willing to reach out to the ball companies and see if they have any additional options. Let us know what you hear!

      Reply

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