BEST ELECTRIC CART OF 2020
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BEST ELECTRIC CART OF 2020

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BEST ELECTRIC CART OF 2020
Motocaddy M7 Remote
MGI Zip Navigator Remote
Alphard eWheels Club Booster V2
Most Wanted Electric Cart
Motocaddy M7 Remote

Electric carts are meant to make your game easier and the M7 doesn’t overcomplicate things. It’s easy to use and the remote feature works from significant distances. Motocaddy perfected a tight turn and an extra back wheel prevents it from tipping over, even on hills or other terrain.

  • Best Electric Cart 2020
  • Extra back wheel to prevent tipping over
  • Remote control for stress-free round
  • Multiple accessories for purchase
  • Multiple speed variations
  • USB port to charge phones
  • Doesn’t have a follow mode
MGI Zip Navigator Remote

The Zip Navigator Remote stops and starts on a dime. It has multiple speed levels and no matter which speed you choose, the rear wheel keeps it balanced. The slim compact design folds down to a small storage size. You can also use it as a fitness tracking device; it tells you how far you’ve walked at the end of a round.

  • Easy to use remote control
  • Quick stopping distance
  • All-terrain wheels for varying weather conditions
  • Slim and compact design
  • Tracks your walking distance
  • Bottom strap could be adjustable for smaller bags
  • Doesn’t have a follow mode
Best Value
Alphard eWheels Club Booster V2

Already have a standard push cart? The Alphard eWheels Club Booster allows you to turn it into an electric cart. It sounds complicated but it’s simple and easy to use. “Follow mode” makes the cart hands free. Gyro technology helps keep your bag upright. It works best with carts that have a 360-degree front wheel.

  • Best Value 2020
  • Converts standard push carts into electric
  • Has a “follow mode” via attachment clip
  • Gyro technology keeps cart running straight
  • Stability is dependent on push cart

2020 ELECTRIC PUSH CART BUYER’S GUIDE

What a difference a year makes.

Thanks to a remarkable and unprecedented 2020, the U.S. was introduced to and now knows all about electric and push carts. If you wanted to play golf in the pandemic, individual carts were the only option.

Although it seems every avid golfer owns a cart of some sort, the U.S. still falls behind Europe. Apparently, Motocaddy is No. 1 in unit sales globally which is an impressive achievement considering the U.S. is still a relatively untapped source.

All the carts we tested are electric and some models are undeniably more feature-rich than others (though none is equipped with any gopher detectors). Some carts follow you. Others have a built-in GPS, and can tell you how far you’ve walked, and plenty more.

Whether you’re looking to buy a new electric cart today, looking for some buying advice or just want a closer look at what’s on the market, this guide will help you find the right cart to fit your needs.

How We Test

We're here to help you find the perfect electric push cart to fit your needs.

To do that, we employ a thorough and fully independent testing process that leaves no feature unexplored, no detail unchecked, and no stone unturned.

Our Metrics

Electric carts are tested head to head using rigorous protocols.

The metrics we consider when rating electric carts include Features, Maneuverability, Folded Size, Ease of Use.

The Best Electric Cart 2020 - Features

ProductBattery TypeNumber of WheelsBattery LifeRemoteWarranty
Alphard eWheels Club Booster V2

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Lithium227 HolesYes1 Year
Foresight Forecaddy

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Lithium436 HolesYes1 Year
MGI Zip Navigator Remote

Check Price
Lithium436 HolesYes2 Year
Motocaddy M1 DHC

Check Price
Lithium336 HolesNo2 Year
Motocaddy M5 GPS

Check Price
Lithium336 HolesNo2 Year
Motocaddy M7 Remote

Check Price
Lithium336 HolesYes2 Year
Best Smart Cart - Motocaddy M5 GPS

Best Smart Cart - Motocaddy M5 GPS

Just like it's older brother, the Motocaddy M5 GPS has a slim and functional design that includes a GPS device. The GPS offers distances, hazard views, pin location and score tracking. The cart is far enough off the ground that it easily handles any terrain.

EXPERT TIP - Remote or Manual

If you like to be hands-on with your electric cart you should consider a manual version. For those who want some freedom, carts with remote control allow you to walk the course and enjoy your round.

FEATURES THAT MATTER TO YOU

Maneuverability

For the ultimate in maneuverability, you want a cart with a 360-degree front wheel. Carts with fixed front wheels sometimes struggle to make tight turns. Also be aware that some models are designed to follow you wherever you go, staying within seven feet at all times. If that’s problematic, consider a remote-controlled model that only goes where you tell it to.

For those who want a cart that turns with ease, consider Motocaddy M7 Remote and MGI Zip Navigator Remote.

Stability

For powered push carts, there are two primary stability considerations. The first is the ability to handle uneven and challenging terrain.

The second consideration is the cart’s ability to keep your bag upright when it is in motion. We found that some models don’t secure bags as tightly as they should.

Golfers who want the best of both should look into the Motocaddy family, especially the M7 Remote and M5 GPS. Alphard eWheels Club Booster V2 will depend on what push cart you have for the V2 to attach to.

Battery Life

One of two types of batteries are used in powered push carts: lead acid or lithium. In the carts we tested, we found that lithium batteries provide longer running life and can keep your cart rolling for 27-plus holes.

All models tested last 27-plus holes with some easily completing 36. Foresight ForeCaddy is a great example of a long-lasting battery.

EXPERT TIP - Weight

For many golfers, the weight of the electric cart can be an issue lifting it from trunk to ground. Be realistic with how much you can lift so that you don't pull a muscle before you make the first tee.

The Best Electric Cart 2020 - Results

ProductFeaturesManeuverabilityFolded SizeEase of UseTotal
Motocaddy M7 Remote

Check Price
3rd1st1st1st95
MGI Zip Navigator Remote

Check Price
2nd1st4th4th94.5
Motocaddy M5 GPS

Check Price
3rd4th1st1st88.5
Alphard eWheels Club Booster V2

Check Price
5th3rd6th5th87
Motocaddy M1 DHC

Check Price
6th4th1st1st85.5
Foresight Forecaddy

Check Price
1st4th5th6th85

More Tips

  • Even in this relatively new category, there is a variety of features available. As with anything else, look for a cart that gives you what you need without overcharging for features you don’t.
  • Powered push carts with 360-degree rotation wheels make turning on a dime effortless.
  • If you use a stand bag, you’ll want to verify that the cart can hold your bag upright throughout your round.
  • Look for a cart with adjustable handles to help ensure you can maneuver it comfortably when it’s not driving itself.
  • When purchasing an electric push cart, verify the manufacturer has a local distributor. It can make getting your cart repaired or obtaining replacement parts significantly easier.

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The Best Electric Cart of 2020 – FAQ

Q: Should I get a manual electric cart or a remote-controlled electric cart?

A: Manual carts do the job if you’re just looking to take weight off your back. If you want something completely hands free and effortless – almost like you’re playing with a caddie – remote-controlled carts are the way to go.

Q: How does an electric cart work?

A: Electric push carts are powered by small batteries. The batteries need to be charged after every round through a power outlet. Depending on the battery type, you should get two to five seasons out of the battery depending on how many rounds you play.

Q: Are electric push carts allowed on every golf course?

A: Not all courses allow electric push carts. Before playing a new course, check with the pro shop to confirm that push carts are allowed.

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      Jeremy

      3 years ago

      I have the Foresight Forecaddy and when it was working all features follow, power assist worked relatively well. However, the left handle broke and I brought the cart in for service. They repaired the left handle, and redesigned the handle because others had the same problems. Anyways, I receive my cart back and the follow and power assist modes did not work. Follow mode which is awesome when it works wasn’t the same. I then bring it back to them for service and they said the firmware didn’t take and problem fixed. I then take it out and the same problems occur with the follow mode. Basically the design of the cart is not meant to manually push because the front wheels diameter is so small. I went from a Clicgea 8.0 to this cart so I know a clicgear design can go through heavy grass and designed well. I bring the cart back and they said they will put the cart through a full diagnostic and give them a week to do the full diagnostic. After a week they email me to tell me “The Forecaddy is one of our devices that is not manufactured in house by Foresight. The Third party manufacturers that designs and builds the Forecaddy ultimately has the authority to authorize all repairs and replacements. We are still waiting a response on your particular cart.”
      So the entire time I’m assigning they are fixing my cart in house. My argument is if they can’t fix my cart which is still within 1 year warranty, why don’t they just give me a new cart replacement. This is unacceptable customer service. I’ve been patient with the repair time. I’d be more frustrated if I had to ship the cart in for repair, luckily I’m local. Anyone considering purchasing this cart, I highly DO NO RECOMMEND.

      Reply

      T Lopez

      3 years ago

      I have a question for you guys and this looks like the right place to get a legit answer.
      I have a Clic Gear 4.0 and went into a retail store in CA last week to buy the ClubBosster V2 from Alphard to upgrade my 4.0. It was $799. The clerk said don’t do it to my amazement. He then told me that the V2 and the solo front wheel 4.0 will have steering problems. That the front wheel will start to wear on one side or the other from the turns with the front wheel being non-maneuverable. He said look, you’re in $250 for the clic gear, another $800 for the Electric wheels and I would need the $100 swivel kit that turns the 4.0 into a 4 wheel model to effectively make it work right. He said to save that money and invest in the MGI Zip Navigator. I have a lot of ClicGear accessories which I like but is he right?? Should I bail on the ClicGear and go for the Zip Navigator?

      Reply

      Jim

      3 years ago

      Might have more luck in forums. Maybe this thread would be helpful: https://forum.mygolfspy.com/topic/40086-alphard-ewheels-club-booster-v2/?tab=comments#comment-670359

      Reply

      Mike M

      3 years ago

      Well I have had the original V1 EWheels for 3 years and you can see my reply a little further down. I have the model 8 with 4 wheels so I cant speak to what the guy is referring to about alignment issue after a while? But if you have had that cart for a while, you shoudl already be seeing what he is referring to. Also, doesn’t that crat have the alignment adjustment feature on the front wheel? Also, replacing a front wheel is pretty cheap if it got worn down over time? The Zip Navigator seems like a good cart, but its $1500 plus tax and you will need all new accessories for it. If you can get the V2 wheels (because my friends say they are back ordered and impossible to find) , I would do it. I love mine and have zero complaints. Plus, you would be saving yourself quite a bit of money.

      Reply

      Steve G

      3 years ago

      T Lopez, I have the 4.0 and just received my V2 and have already played with it…GAMECHANGER! Caveat, I bought the conversion kit for the front two wheels (currently $85 on the alphardgolf.com website) as I had read the cart turns much tighter and there’s less wear on the wheel motors), and it was easy to install and works as promised. If getting the V2 I would highly recommend it. I like being able to use all my accessories (to include my seat) and can’t recommend the V2 highly enough. The remote is great, the TFS is THE BOMB! Bottom Line: DON’T BAIL ON YOUR 4.0!

      Reply

      Tony

      3 years ago

      Thanks Steve,. With the conversion kit, do the 2 new wheels swivel? I play a course that does have some hills, nothing terribly extreme but that’s what I am looking into the electric model in the first place, have you had any issues with the 4.0 and the V2 going up hills? How about down hills? does it just lock up ad slide down hill or can you adjust the speed with the remote?
      Thx!!

      Steve Griswold

      3 years ago

      Tony, the wheels swivel. I play nine courses here at Pinehurst and several are hilly and the V2 with swivel kit works great. I take it up/down rough terrain and it works fine. When going uphill through natural areas and the front wheels bounce up the wheelie bars on the back keep the cart stable and it keeps moving forward. I played Wed with frost on the ground on a hilly Course No.8 and the cart stopped on the downslopes when I had it stop, no sliding. Speed is adjustable on the remote. This thing is awesome!!

      Jason G

      3 years ago

      Hey T Lopez … I feel the clerk is overstating the expected issues with the fixed-wheel cart. I have a Clicgear 3.5+, which has a single fixed wheel in the front, and the issues are minimal.

      More details below, but my general assessment is that I’d buy the eWheels for my cart again 10 times out of 10. As Steve G said, it’s a game-changer.

      Financially, you don’t need the wheel kit, so you’re looking at getting an eWheels V2 for less than half the price of the Navigator. There might be a few features that are nice on the Navigator, but nothing that’s worth $800. I’d take that money and spend it on more rounds of golf!

      — Steering Problems —
      You’re going to notice if you cart is out of alignment more than if you were pushing it by hand. However, I was able to adjust the front wheel on my cart. It falls out of alignment slightly over the course of a season (~20 rounds), but I just adjust it again. The effort to adjust the wheel is trivial compared to the advantage of having a motorized cart.

      During the round, it only takes a quick press of the right or left button on the remote to get the cart back on track if veers off a bit. I barely even notice when I need t press the button… and I probably could do it less often if I wasn’t so lazy about adjusting the front wheel.

      There are times when the fixed front wheel is an asset. If you’re going over uneven terrain — tire ruts, tree roots, etc. — the fixed wheel keeps the cart on track. I would have to think a pivoting front wheel would catch and want to turn the cart in some of those situations.

      The obvious drawback is the lack of zero-radius turns. However, I just push the handle down and hit the left or right button on the remote while the front wheel is in the air. It’s second nature at this point. Sure, a ZRT is cool to see and will wow others at your club, but the number of times where a pivoting front wheel would have made a significant difference in my real-world, on-course eWheels experience is zero.

      — Front Wheel Wear and Tear —
      Easy…. follow the manual and don’t turn your cart while it’s on pavement or concrete. Problem solved.

      Seriously, I’ve used my eWheels for at least 50 rounds, and there is absolutely no noticeable side-to-side wear and tear on the front wheel. If you don’t turn on pavement or asphalt, you’re only asking the front wheel to slide on grass.

      Reply

      FCS1611

      3 years ago

      This review says the Motocaddy M7 is easier to use than than the MGI Navigator. What more specifically makes it easier to use? I’m weighing up between these two.

      Reply

      John

      4 years ago

      You mention MGI Zip Nav has more features than Motocaddy M7 Remote…what are the differences in features?

      Reply

      Stephen Pearcy

      4 years ago

      What – No Kangaroo Tested? Been around for a long time and are bullet proof. Older ones are heavy (however, they do push themselves) but the newer ones are lighter.

      Reply

      Scott Miller

      4 years ago

      Really nice to see Motocaddy in the mix here. I have a Powakaddy and the European based companies do electric carts so well. 25 trips on a riding cart and it’s paid for itself.

      Reply

      LABillyboy

      4 years ago

      Thanks for the reviews. I am holding off until someone perfects the follow me cart.. I’ve used my friends Stewart X9 and it’s just not there yet, plus it’s pretty bulky. I’ve also tried a couple remotes, I just don’t like having to “drive” it. takes concentration away from talking with partners, having a drink, etc. The Caddytrek I used just looked like something cobbled in someone’s garage… It worked OK, but still lost it a couple times where I had to go back and get it.

      Look forward to you guys continued testing to let me know when someone has solved all the issues!

      Reply

      Mike M

      4 years ago

      I have had the Alphard E wheels for 2.5 years and they have never failed to deliver. I actually have 2 other players who decided to get them after many rounds of me walking along drinking a beer hands free. Meanwhile they were pushing their carts and getting tired by hole 13. The Ewheels only cost me $600 and added them to a Clicgear Model 8 (4 wheel cart $250). I have a cooler underneath as well as my Ping cart bag and a bose speaker and Garmin GPS with a sand bottle riding on this thing. I usually have about 40% battery left after 18 holes. So, even that heavy load and our moderate hills don’t seem to affect its performance. It even has a “send” feature. You can send the whole cart away to 15, 30 and 60 yard distances over to the next hole, away from the green, etc… My total bill was around $850-$900. If it ever fails, I will buy it again.

      Reply

      Jason G

      3 years ago

      +1 … I love my eWheels. I bought mine when it was still on Kickstarter and attached it to my ClikGear 3.5+. This was my third season with it, and I couldn’t be happier.

      The cart conversion took minutes. Anyone can do it. Once the clips are installed on the cart, setup at the course takes seconds.

      I almost always have the cart in front of me, so I don’t need the follow mode. My home course is really hilly, so this takes all the work out of hauling my clubs around the course. I know I’m playing better on the back nine because I’m not so tired from carrying my clubs.

      Even on the hottest days of the year when I load up my bag with drinks, the eWheels does its job effortlessly.

      Also, hat tip to the owner. He was very helpful before I purchased. We traded a few emails, and he answered all of my questions promptly. It gave me great confidence in my decision.

      Reply

      Michael

      4 years ago

      I like the idea of a motorized cart but its insane that these companies believe these carts are worth $2k+. The technology in them has been around forever and doesn’t cost anywhere near that much to build.

      Reply

      Kansas King

      4 years ago

      Agree. I’ve never understood the high cost related to these carts. I feel there is massive potential for electric push carts that is untapped. Alphard appears to be the only company at least trying to tap into this market. If a company could produce a reasonable option (complete cart) for $500, I think it would sell well. Even just an electric assist would be nice. I would pay an extra $100 or so for a push cart that would simply assist and take around 50% of effort out of pushing.

      Reply

      Jason G

      3 years ago

      I was in the same boat as you guys. I highly recommend that you take a look at the eWheels. I use it exactly how you mention, as “hill assist” on my hilly home course. I rarely have my cart more than a few feet from me, it’s more about removing the effort and energy required to push the cart than it is to send my clubs all over the course without me nearby..

      It runs about $600 and works with your current cart. I didn’t have a push cart, so I bought the ClikGear 3.5+. Between getting the eWheels when it was still on Kickstarter and buying my cart at an end-of-season sale, I was all in for less than $800.

      Dave Logsdon

      4 years ago

      I see that you couldn’t include as many models as you would have preferred. But I always thought Bag Boy would have been one of the first to consider. I have used the Bag Boy Navigator Quad for about 3 years. It has the lithium battery and always lasts more than 18 holes. I think it would probably to 36 if I could still play that much. It also has a seat if you have to wait on the group in front of you. It’s not cheap at about $2000, but I wouldn’t trade it for any other I have seen. Oh and it also has the GPS ability to keep it going straight even on the side of a hill. I usually run it about 30 yards ahead of me to keep me moving.

      Reply

      Kevin

      4 years ago

      I too have a Bag Boy branded cart. They are manufactured by MGI and just have a Bag Boy tag on them. Great carts..

      Reply

      Jay

      4 years ago

      I did a lot of research (about a years worth) before deciding on the MGI Navigator this spring. I spoke to some reps, players with electric carts and did internet reviews. I found that this model, that was high on the list, was available through Costco as a full package with accessories which helped with my choice.

      I now have over 150 miles of playing with it and that’s on a very hilly course with varied terrain.

      I love walking the course, but my low back just couldn’t take pushing a cart up and down hills anymore, and carrying during Covid, when the courses would not put drinking water out, made carrying more about an endurance/torture test rather than a fun golf outing.

      Now that I’ve had plenty of rounds (average about 4-5, 18 hole rounds per week) with this cart, I can say I’m absolutely pleased with my pick – no regrets whatsoever. And the more my partners watch me play rounds with it, the more envious they are becoming.

      As far as being difficult to manage direction, pffft, really? Forward, backward, left, right or full stop with my thumb – not a problem as far as I know. . Forward has multiple speeds that are attained by pushing the forward button multiple times, and to slow down push the reverse button multiple times until it stops or reaches the desired pace. High speed is pretty fast – like runners pace, and slowest speed is a very slow walking gait.

      I’ve only dumped it once and that was an idiotic episode. I was racing my buddy, who was driving in a cart, to the next tee and I sent my caddie/cart forward.. I was turning for the tee when the cart caught the edge of the cart path/pot hole at full speed and took a violent hit that sent it onto it’s side – clearly irresponsible operator error on my part. No damage, only pride. Never again. This cart does have a gyroscopic feature that keeps it going straight, and maintains it in an upright position even when it hits uneven terrain and that’s a pretty impressive feature – the aforementioned idiotic circumstance being the exception.

      My only wish is that as part of their design they had a pouch or storage bag attachment, like I have on my Sun Mountain push cart to carry extra clothes, food and beverages – but my cart bag can handle it all readily.

      I’ve played 36 holes with ease, without charging the lithium battery or the remote, and it had plenty to juice remaining according to the charge indicator light. That came in handy because I forgot to charge it after a round and realized it the next morning when I was heading for the course.
      I have a full size Ping Pioneer cart bag I use on it and have had it fully loaded with drinks, jacket/pants/gloves rain gear, extra towels, ~ 12 balls, umbrella, 14 clubs and the usual sundry of other stuff and it has not shown any signs of slowing down or laboring up the hills or through deep, wet rough. I’ve had it out on 100 degree days and during downpours and thus far it’s been absolutely reliable. It also folds down into a fairly small area that fits into the back of my Subaru Outback easily along with my bag.

      At the end of each round I pull the cart out, blow off the grass clippings with my air compressor, wipe it down, plug in the battery, remote control and my gps watch so everything is clean and fully charged for my next round.

      As far as any of the other carts reviewed on msg or by other members, I have no idea how well they perform, but the people I play with who have the electric push carts that require hands on control, are now wishing they had my remote because it allows for absolutely free arm swing walking. I love being able to send my bag up the fairway to my ball while I enjoy my walk. Golf has taken on a new dimension with this wonderful invention. It’s like having an electronic caddie who doesn’t sweat, swear or expect a tip at the end of the round.

      Reply

      Tom

      3 years ago

      I, too, have the Zip Navigator and share your experience.. A few others at my club have acquired it after seeing me buzzing about. I will say there was a learning curve. The first round was getting comfortable with the remote. And about 3 or 4 more rounds figuring out the caddy’s limits and the best routes at my course. Probably a few more before I didn’t feel distracted by the caddy and able to comfortably carry on a conversation. Then again, I have difficulty walking and chewing gum.

      I do wonder about the motocaddy as its battery placement, in front of the rear wheels, looks like it would make for a slightly more stable caddy. than the Zip Navigator, with its battery just behind the rear axle. My course is extremely hilly and I have to put my hands on my Zip Navigator in a few places or I risk a real mess.

      I have about 25 rounds on mine since getting it last year.

      Reply

      The Smogmonster

      4 years ago

      I have owned the Alphard version 1 for three years. I was one of the original backers when it was being developed. Still runs like the day I received it. Totally reliable. The battery is still good for 27 holes. I love my e-wheels. I may scoop up the version 2 if it truly is auto-follow.

      A three wheeled cart is best. Even better if the front wheel swivels like my Rovic.

      You will not be disappointed with this cart and the cost is pretty reasonable.

      Reply

      Mike

      4 years ago

      Good article. I’ve seen a guy or two of my course use them but I’m still not sold, esp for that kind of money. And I’d have to see the cart over rough terrain, going off and on cartpaths, up steep hills, etc in person before I even consider making a huge investment like that. I also want dependable customer service and a place to take it if something goes wrong. Learned my lesson about that last point a few years ago when I owned a riding cart for a season. It was an old one & getting service on it was incredibly difficult & undependable.

      Reply

      Brian Parsons

      4 years ago

      What? No Bat Caddy?
      I’ve had a Bat Caddy X4R for several years. Well made, very strong lightweight frame, great remote features and plenty of speed. They could use some updating, but for $900USD ($1200USD for lithium), I think its a great product.

      Reply

      RC

      4 years ago

      I’ve been using the Stewart X9 Remote since last November, and I’m puzzled how it didn’t even garner an honorable mention! I’ll put my Stewart up against all of these pretenders – it beats them all in every category. I don’t know if the article is missing a couple of words in it’s title – did you mean “best”, or “best of the rest”?

      Reply

      Harry Nodwell

      4 years ago

      Thank you for your comment. If you go to previous electric cart articles you will find Stewart golf models included. Previous Stewart golf models have had their faults, just like every model tested. My guess is that you haven’t tested all of these models head to head to compare.

      Reply

      RC

      4 years ago

      Well, your guess would be accurate! However, the guys with some of the models you mention come up to me because they’re not happy with theirs for various reasons. The Stewart looks sturdier than theirs, and the battery is much more convenient. I’m not a big fan of the “follow” feature because I have played with a guy with that one, and his head is constantly on a swivel. The guy that said he doesn’t like steering with the remote because it takes away from his social experience obviously hasn’t steered the Stewart – I send mine at a very fast pace directly to my ball and it’s there waiting for me – I talk and drink with no issues.

      Jim

      4 years ago

      Not sure that I agree that remote control caddies are “effortless”. My buddies with remote control carts are constantly fiddling with the direction of their carts. At my club one has gone into a pond and one off a cliff when the owner wasn’t paying attention. Others have had to run them down when they got out of range or the remote stopped working. I have a non-remote Motocaddie S1 and am plenty happy with its simplicity (plus it is hundreds of $ cheaper)

      Reply

      Harry Nodwell

      4 years ago

      This sounds like a user error. I found remote control models to be easy and effortless even around the greens or hazards

      Reply

      Jon Silverberg

      4 years ago

      Yes, it’s user error; however, I have seen a lot of the same problems Jim refers to (many of the guys in my club have electrics with remote controls). For that reason, when I bought my Bat Caddy, I made sure to get one without a remote, and that also saved me a lot of money (it cost $440, with a 36 hole capable lead-acid battery). After two years and 150 rounds or so, I needed to pay another $80 for a replacement battery. I’m very satisfied, and consider the lack of worry without the remote to be a major positive.

      HAC

      4 years ago

      I have had an MGI Zip Navigator for a couple of years now and really like it.

      Reply

      Bill

      4 years ago

      I have a MGI Zip Navigator and couldn’t be more happy with it’s performance and quality build. I’ve put over 60 rounds on it since I bought it in December of 2019. It.Is.A.Beast. Our course is hilly and the terrain is at times rather bumpy (between tee box and fairway; green and tee box). Yes I’ve dumped it a time or two (hitting a hole with one wheel), but it’s quite tough – zero damage. It’s plenty fast and has 36 hole stamina even on our course. The battery and it’s connection is a piece of engineering art. It’s built like a Hilti drill – made to last forever. Super impressed, and I’m a very tough critic when it comes to my tools and vehicles. Oh, my Ping Traverse cart bag fits wonderfully on it, and it too has my highest recommendation. Bravo MGI!

      Reply

      Chris

      4 years ago

      A Best Electric cart of 2020 with only 4 makes considered not even a mention of Powakaddy or Stewart or loads of other contenders. You can’t be serious.

      Reply

      Harry Nodwell

      4 years ago

      Next year we will have more companies included. But because of the pandemic, it slowed new model releases and it was hard to contact individuals because people weren’t in the office.

      Reply

      Christian

      4 years ago

      Hey Harry,
      I‘m from Germany and we have great e-card companys over here like Jucad and Ticad these things are amazing and have very cool Design.
      The things you tested look like Tanks.
      And the 2 brands i mentioned are sportscars compared to your tested once.
      I‘m sure if you show Pictures of Jucad the US guys will love it.
      As a guess from my side 30% of the golfers here have e-caddy.
      But the flipside is the price on these they are mega cool but not to get below 2500 € in the basic version.
      P.s sorry for spelling mistakes, but typing english on a german phone is hard.
      Best Chris

      Ernest

      4 years ago

      Anytime I see skinny wheels/tires on a cart, it worries me. I don’t see how skinny tires WON’T make ruts through a moist fairway. Wider wheels will float atop, while skinny wheels cut through.

      It’s the exact same premise that Professional Rally Driver’s use when choosing a snow tire (skinny) over a wider tire, because they don’t want to be skating atop the snow in a wide tire.

      Just my $0.02 (but that’s Canadian, so with the exchange, it’s really only $0.01)

      Reply

      Shawn

      4 years ago

      Great review, THANK YOU. I saw 2 bat-caddies this past Sunday and the owners were impressed. Seeing how much they cost did you rely on donations from Mfg’s or member loaners? As far as Alphard they have been delayed again, looking at the end of September. They did tell me the new price will be in the $899 area and the wheelie wheels will be included along with a follow umbilical cord and of course still remote.

      Reply

      Eric Norris

      4 years ago

      Which one has the best follow mode?

      Reply

      Harry Nodwell

      4 years ago

      The Foresight Forecaddy was the only model with a follow mode

      Reply

      Ed

      4 years ago

      I have the Motocaddy M3 DHC with 36 hole Lithium Battery.. This cart works well on my hilly, rough, rugged home course. It is well built, sturdy., opens and folds easily and quickly.. The lithium battery is no joke… i have played 2 – 18 hole rounds on consecutive days without recharging with power to spare just to test the 36 hole battery claim although it’s recommended to ALWAYS recharge as soon as possible.. Same chassis on all MSeries Motocaddy, just different features and price points…
      I got what I wanted.. Thanks.

      Reply

      RonTR

      4 years ago

      Have you ever included the Kangaroo cats? Several of my friends have them and say they are durable, easy to operate and have excellent support from the company

      Reply

      Jeff Fish

      4 years ago

      The Alphard Ewheels is a great choice if you already have a push cart. I have a ClicGear 3.5+ and been using version 1 for over 2.5 years. I am eagerly awaiting delivery of the version 2 with the swivel wheels for the front wheel replacement to allow it to turn even more easily. Great product especially for the price. And, in my experience, Alphard’s customer service is excellent.

      Reply

      Thilo

      4 years ago

      You should really include Jucad trolleys in the test. I have no affiliation with them but use their titan model since 2017. In Germany/Europe they have a enormous market share, despite the very high price tag. Why? Because they are indestructible and look better than all cheaper plastic competitors

      Reply

      Antti

      4 years ago

      I have one as well and by far the most compact and elegant make around. Only drawback is the horrendous pricing.

      Reply

      Walter

      4 years ago

      And what was the price of your model or the new models.

      RC

      4 years ago

      I’m in the US, and never heard of these, but I went to their website, and now I’m blown away by this brand! They look so sleek, it’s hard for me to figure out where the battery goes – so I need to ask you, what kind of battery does it use, and where does the battery fit? Thanks

      Reply

      Antti

      4 years ago

      The battery (tiny) goes in your bag.

      Christian Peters

      4 years ago

      it can also be placed in a extra basket made of Metal,which can be attached to the main axis

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