Ball Lab: Callaway Chrome Tour 2024
Golf Balls

Ball Lab: Callaway Chrome Tour 2024

Support our Mission. We independently test each product we recommend. When you buy through our links, we may earn a commission.

Ball Lab: Callaway Chrome Tour 2024

MyGolfSpy Ball Lab is where we quantify the quality and consistency of golf balls. Today, we’re reviewing the 2024 Callaway Chrome Tour . To learn more about our test process, click here.

About the Callaway Chrome Tour 2024

The Callaway Chrome Tour has been three to four years in the making. A colleague sums it up well: “The signature piece of a revitalized Callaway golf ball lineup and strategy is the Chrome Tour … designed to compete with the Pro V1.”

Don’t scan the shelves of the golf ball aisle for the typical red box when looking for the new Chrome Tour. Along with the new gold-colored box, the Tour golf ball features other notable changes such as the logo, player number, brighter paint, different fonts and larger side stamp.

Jason Finley, Callaway’s Global Director Brand and Product Management for Golf Ball says, “I’m not going to tell you that going from red to gold is going to solve all the world’s problems for us, but I do think it will get people to think about us a little bit differently than they have in the past.” Notably absent is the “Soft” naming convention of previous models. Finley says, “The new name leverages our premium Brand franchise and the Tour name is a goal to better associate the best players with this product. Believe in some cases our Soft naming implied to some it was not a Tour ball. “Only time will tell if the Callaway Chrome Tour can be “The New Gold Standard.”

Callaway classifies the Chrome Tour as medium-feel ball with low spin for the long game and high spin for the short game. Furthermore, Callaway says the Chrome Tour has “high workability” which should appeal to golfers looking to shape their shots. The Chrome Tour is available in multiple iterations in solid white or yellow as well as in the Triple Track, 360 Triple Track and TruTrack versions in both colors. A cursory review of the Callaway website reveals other options: the Major Series and Lone Wolf. Whether you’re looking for something traditional, with built-in alignment aids or just something a little different, Callaway has an option for you.

The Callaway Chrome Tour is manufactured in the United States at their significantly upgraded manufacturing plant in Chicopee, Mass.

Key Takeaways

  • The first Callaway ball since before Chrome Soft to compete directly with the Pro V1.
  • With an average compression of 87, the Callaway Chrome Tour is an option for golfers who prefer a firm feel.
  • Finley notes, “Targeted for the better player looking for a balanced performance and feel.”

Callaway Chrome Tour Construction

The Chrome Tour has four-piece construction with “new hyper fast soft core” that Callaway says “is engineered for better players who want the best balance of long distance and soft feel.” The Chrome Tour’s core is wrapped in a 332-dimple urethane cover. Callaway says “the cover system provides outstanding control and Tour-level feel” and that the “uniquely designed aerodynamic package is built for consistently stable ball flights in any condition.”

Callaway Chrome Tour Compression

The Callaway Chrome Tour has an average compression of 87, five points greater than the database average of 82 and on par with Titleist Pro V1 (2023).

Other balls falling a point above and below at 86 and 88, respectively, are the Mizuno RB Tour (2023) and TaylorMade TP5 (2021).

The compression consistency across the sample was rated as “average” (see below) with an approximate 12-point compression range across the sample due to one ball coming in at 78.3 and the highest at 90. Without the one outlier coming in at 78.3 and being flagged as bad, the sample compression range shrinks to 6 with a range from 84 to 90.

Compression Chart

We’ve had requests for a standalone compression comparison tool. As it turns out, that tool exists. We created it as part of our Golf Ball Compression FAQ page. At some point, we may merge the two charts but, for now, the plan is to include this chart in future Ball Labs.

Diameter and Weight

None of the balls in the sample fell under the USGA’s minimum diameter standard. All met our standard for roundness. Size consistency across the sample was in the “average” range.

Callaway Chrome Tour – Inspection

Centeredness and Concentricity

No notable concentricity defects/off-center layers were detected across the three dozen tested.

Core Consistency

The core colors of the balls were consistent throughout the sample. No unmixed material/chunks were noted.

Cover

No cover defects were identified in our sample.

Callaway Chrome Tour – Consistency

In this section, we detail the consistency of the Callaway Chrome Tour. Our consistency metrics measure how similar the balls in our sample were to one another relative to all of the models we’ve tested to date.

Weight Consistency

  • Weight consistency falls within the “Good” range.
  • Slight variability to the median across all three dozen sampled.

Diameter Consistency

  • Diameter consistency of the Callaway Chrome Tour falls within the “Average” range.
  • Box 1 was slightly smaller to the average, Box 2 exhibited more variability and Box 3 was more consistent to the average.

Compression Consistency

  • Compression consistency falls within the “Average” range.
  • Boxes 1 and 2 had slight variability while Box 3 had a bit more variability with half on the higher end of the compression average.
  • Compression across the sample ranged from 78.3 to 90 with a compression delta of ≈12 points. One ball came in at 78.3 and was flagged as bad. Without the bad ball, the sample ranged from 84 to 90 with a compression delta of six points.

True Price

True Price is how we quantify the quality of a golf ball. It’s a projection of what you’d have to spend to ensure you get 12 good balls.

The True Price will always be equal to or greater than the retail price. The greater the difference between the retail price and the True Price, the more you should be concerned about the quality of the ball.

Callaway Chrome Tour 2024 – Golf Ball Quality Summary

To learn more about our test process, how we define “Bad” balls and our True Price metric, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

The Good

  • “Average” consistency across the compression and diameter metrics that we test.
  • An above-average urethane option with compression on par Titleist Pro V1 (2023).

The Bad

  • One bad ball noted due to compression inconsistency.

The Score

The True Price for the Callaway Chrome Tour is $56.56. That’s a three-percent increase over the retail price we paid at time testing of $54.99 per dozen.

At the time of testing, the Callaway Chrome Tour received a Ball Lab score of 81, one point below another firm ball with comparable compression, the Srixon Z-Star (2019), and seven points above the current database average of 74. While there was one bad ball in our sample due to variation in compression, the rest offered good continuity from ball to ball. A ball being bad for having a compression value significantly different from the median “could” be caused by a ball not being perfectly round, layer thickness differences and/or potential inconsistent core mixtures.

The Chrome Tour is a premium urethane golf ball that Callaway put significant time, effort and money into designing and manufacturing prior to bringing it to market. Is it worth a test run on your local track? The simple answer is “yes.” If you do, give the Chrome Tour more than just a hasty trial run, as you should with any potential equipment change. The Callaway Chrome Tour 2024 is looking to usurp the current category leader but only time will tell if it can be “The New Gold Standard.”

On

CHECK PRICE

Support Unbiased Testing.

DID YOU KNOW: If only 1% of MyGolfSpy readers donated $25, we would be able to become completely independent in 12-months. With every donation, you create change.

Would you be willing to help by giving a donation? Every dollar will help. Make a donation to support our independent and expert golf equipment research. A PayPal account is not required in order to donate.

Donate to MGS


Amount

Frequency

For You

For You

Drivers
Jun 11, 2024
Callaway Paradym Ai Smoke Ti 340 Mini Driver
Putters
Jun 11, 2024
Triple Black Evnroll 38 Tour Spec Putters
FootJoy limited FootJoy limited
First Look
Jun 11, 2024
JUST DROPPED: FootJoy Red Clay Premiere Series
Robert Colella

Robert Colella

Robert Colella

Robert Colella

Robert Colella

Robert Colella

Ball Lab: 2024 Titleist AVX
May 5, 2024 | 8 Comments
Ball Lab: PXG Xtreme
Mar 18, 2024 | 5 Comments
Ball Lab: Trust Bison V
Mar 8, 2024 | 9 Comments
Ball Lab: Seed SD-01 – 3rd Generation
Feb 16, 2024 | 11 Comments
Robert Colella

Robert Colella

Robert Colella

Robert Colella

Robert Colella

Robert Colella





    This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

      KM

      1 month ago

      This has been the best ball for me this year- zero durability issues with cover and performed awesome into and down wind for me.

      Reply

      Tim

      2 months ago

      I have to be honest, these labs keep getting more and more confusing.
      “With an average compression of 87, the Callaway Chrome Tour is an option for golfers who prefer a firm feel. Callaway says the Tour has a “medium” feel.”

      Why include two totally different SUBJECTIVE points in a “KEY TAKEAWAY” section???

      All the compression delta numbers add to the confusion……i dont see the need to keep posting all these numbers of different balls when you have a chart to view….do we care about TRUE PRICE???? we buy balls buy the dozen…..they cost $55…..do we care what it would take to get a good 12 balls? no….

      My point is these tests are AWESOME but the way the data is posted is very very confusing and not straight forward. Talking about “averages” makes it look like the ball itself is “average” and not a GOOD BALL……’

      IMO these write ups need to be rethought and presented in a much different manner…even the chart with balls from 2022 is silly…..that data should be kept in a “master data set” and not used for balls you are testing in 2024….ive said it before, the write ups on this site have been heading down hill and its sad because the way you test is great…..

      Reply

      Tyler

      2 months ago

      I have tested this ball pretty extensively since release. While I do think it is a worthy competitor to ProV1, the cover durability has been pretty poor for me. Full wedges seem to really beat this cover up, enough that I am playing at least two balls per round and sometimes as many as 4.

      Reply

      Chris Gent

      1 month ago

      I have new wedges and got a few sleeves of these from some Callaway driver fittings. The MG4 grooves just ripped the covers off of these like they were cheap balata balls being slammed down cartpaths. I can use a Maxfli Tour for 2 rounds when my driver cooperates and keeps them in play and the balls will look better than 3-4 holes of a Chrome Tour…no thanks.

      Reply

      Jay Nichols

      2 months ago

      It’s pretty funny how Callaway has changed the box color to Gold, like Pro V1 packaging, and 24 years after the initial launch of Pro V1, competitors can’t build a product that competes with Titleist, so they copy as much as they can with side stamp arrows, ball model names that all use X for the higher compression version, seems they’ve given up, if you can’t beat them, copy them.

      Reply

      James P

      2 months ago

      In my experience of trying this ball, the cover is strange, not in a bad way but feels kind of firm and waxy. What I would say is the cover seems to hold up a lot longer and doesn’t pick up dirt anywhere near what the current gen Pro V1/X lines do. The Chrome Tour ball on the whole is a very good ball. I found it to be similar to Pro V1 in every way but with lower spin through the bag. In the wind it’s great. For me though it’s not quite the right ball.

      In relation to Titleist, whatever they did to the cover of their latest gen balls, they need to fix it. The covers collect dirt and scuff far too easy compared to last models. I’m now playing Pro V1X left dash which still has the older cover and it’s so much better.

      Reply

      Tyler

      2 months ago

      This Chrome Tour cover is really poor. It looks cheap when new and scuffs from wedges really badly. I will be going back to Titleist for this reason only as I feel like performance wise it is fine. Even TP5 has a much more durable/premium looking cover.

      Reply

      Greg

      2 months ago

      Hoping you just got a bad batch. I snagged one of the 4 dozen cubes after my initial testing went quite well. I’ve just not had the scuffing issues you’ve seen. My oldest wedge is about 10 months old and my newest is about 6 rounds old and even on the cleanest of strikes I’m not seeing any damage to the ball. On average, I get about 3 rounds out of a Chrome Tour before I take it out of play and the durability is much, much improved compared to the Chrome Soft XLS.

      James P

      1 month ago

      Interesting!

      I have not had that experience at all with Chrome Tours scuffing easy. My wedges are 3 months old and no issues that I saw.

      WYBob

      2 months ago

      Question for MGS- as new balls get entered into the Quality Comparison Tool, do all previously tested balls get their scores adjusted and updated appropriately as a result? The reason for my question is that balls tested 3 to 5 years ago appear to have the same scores they were given back when they were tested, yet all new balls tested seem to score lower based on the overall database. For example, I have a hard time believing that a 2023 Pro V1x scores lower than the 2019 and 2021 versions of the ball. The same observation holds for the Pro V1. Either there is something wrong with the way the scores are being calculated in the ever-expanding database, or Titleist has a YTY quality decline (which would be worth an article in of itself- i.e. “Why is the quality in Ball Plant 3 declining?”). Interested minds want to know…

      Reply

      Jay Nichols

      1 month ago

      The quality isn’t declining, you’re talking about three different balls, yes, they’re all PRO V1, but the construction is different, from core chemistry to casing layer formulation, and different cast urethane covers with different dimples for the 2023 vs the 2021 & 2019. Not only is the dimple count different, but the cover hardness is different, and the dimple depth and edge angle, so yes, you’re going to experience differences between different model years.
      Why do you think Justing Thomas is still playing the 2013 PRO V1x?

      Reply

      Jay Nichols

      1 month ago

      By the way, if the quality in BP3 was declining as you say, why isn’t your theory stated by the best players in the world? Every tour worldwide PGA, LPGA, Seniors, DP world tour, US Amateur, Asian tour, korn ferry tour and all others, Titleist is played by 70% of the field, and before you ask, no, they’re not all getting paid to play Titleist balls.

      Reply

      Vito

      2 months ago

      I find it hilarious that when I click on the link for this article you get a pop up ad for Pro V1’s!

      Reply

      Mike L

      2 months ago

      After doing all of the reading on how much Callaway invested in bringing the ball to market, I had to try it for myself. I went out and bought a sleeve to test it against the ProV1 (my current ball). It plays almost identically and, given the same characteristics, I’m not sure how the Maxfli balls rank higher than this one. I have tried both of those and they are clearly nowhere near as similar to the ProV1 as the Callaway is. Everyone has a preference and I have tried many of the top ranked balls, but this score seems off the mark, my two cents.

      Reply

      Peejer

      2 months ago

      Opinions vary, but this review was based on data.

      Reply

      MMMinCRCO

      2 months ago

      Ball Lab = measuring ball construction…how consistent is it from ball to ball and are there bad balls
      Ball Test = ball performance done at numerous swing speeds looking at ball speed, distance, spin, etc.

      Reply

      Tim

      2 months ago

      another confusing aspect to MGS…..maybe the lab should be condensed and then added to the test…..IDK, its just getting harder and harder to read these articles.

      Jack

      2 months ago

      Judging from what i’ve read about this both here and other outlets, it seems like it’s a ‘solid’ choice and performs well, but doesn’t outperform the ProV1 in any significant way and so their ambition of this ball being the ‘gold standard’ is probably just a dream at this point. Everything always has been compared to the ProV1 and unless Titleist cease production, everything will always be compared to the ProV1 in the future as well. Will i try the Chrome Tour if i get the chance, either by being given one or finding one on the course? Definitely i will. Will i purposely choose to buy a dozen Chrome Tour over a dozen ProV1’s next time i buy golf balls? No chance, not unless they were noticeably cheaper anyway. ProV1’s are tried and trusted and you know what you’re getting every time.

      Reply

    Leave A Reply

    required
    required
    required (your email address will not be published)

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    Drivers
    Jun 11, 2024
    Callaway Paradym Ai Smoke Ti 340 Mini Driver
    Putters
    Jun 11, 2024
    Triple Black Evnroll 38 Tour Spec Putters
    FootJoy limited FootJoy limited
    First Look
    Jun 11, 2024
    JUST DROPPED: FootJoy Red Clay Premiere Series