Ball Lab: 2022 Srixon Q-Star Tour Review
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Ball Lab: 2022 Srixon Q-Star Tour Review

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Ball Lab: 2022 Srixon Q-Star Tour Review

MyGolfSpy Ball Lab is where we quantify the quality and consistency of the golf balls on the market to help you find the best ball for your money. Today, we’re taking a look at the 2022 Srixon Q-Star Tour. To learn more about our test process, how we define “bad” balls, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

About the Srixon Q-Star Tour

A photo of the Srixon Q-Star Tour after during MyGolfSpy Ball Lab testing

The Srixon Q-Star Tour is the company’s entry into what we call the “non-Tour” urethane category. It’s a class of balls typically marketed to slow to moderate swing speed golfers. Balls in the category are invariably softer than those played on the PGA TOUR. Relative to something like a Pro V1, they’re typically higher-flying and lower-spinning as well. The commonality is the urethane cover though, generally speaking, non-Tour urethane balls will spin less than true Tour offerings.

The prior generation of the Srixon Q-Star Tour has the dubious distinction of being one of the worst balls tested to date. Transient issue at the factory or an indicator of a systemic problem?

With the 2022 version of the Q-Star Tour, we hope to find some clarity.

Srixon Q-Star Tour Construction

The Srixon Q-Star Tour is a three-piece ball with a 338-dimple cover.

Our samples of the Q-Star Tour were manufactured at the company’s factory in Indonesia.

Compression

A 2022 Srixon Q-Star Tour golf ball in front of a compression gauge

On our gauge, the Srixon Q-Star Tour has an average compression of 67. That’s just two points softer than the previous version, which is a relatively insignificant difference.

Across the market as a whole, it qualifies as a “medium firmness” golf ball. It’s worth noting that the Q-Star Tour is softer than the Chrome Soft and Tour Response. Among the leading balls in its class, only the Bridgestone TOUR B RXS is softer (just barely).

Diameter and Weight

A Srixon Q-Star Tour golf ball being weight tested

The Q-Star Tour qualifies as an average-sized ball relative to the market as a whole. Given that, it’s not surprising that all of the sample conformed to the USGA’s minimum size requirement.

A single ball in the sample failed to meet our standard for roundness. Accordingly, it was flagged as bad.

The average weight of the Q-Star Tour runs a bit heavy relative to our database average.  With that, a single ball in the sample was also flagged as bad for exceeding the USGA’s weight limit of 1.62 ounces.

Inspection

Centeredness and Concentricity

Concentricity issues are what doomed the previous generation of Srixon Q-Star Tour. This time around, things were significantly better with none of the balls showing any significant layer issues.

Core Consistency

The core of a 2022 Srixon Q-Star Tour Golf Ball

Core consistency and color were largely consistent throughout our Q-Star Tour sample.

Cover

No notable cover issues were found.

Srixon Q-Star Tour – Consistency

In this section, we detail the consistency of the 2022 Srixon Q-Star Tour. Our consistency metrics provide a measure of how similar the balls in our sample were to one another relative to all of the models we’ve tested to date.

A chart showing the consistency of the 2022 Srixon Q-Star Tour

 

Weight Consistency

  • Weight consistency for the Srixon Q-Star Tour falls within the high end of the Average range.
  • Our third box was noticeably heavier on average though not by an absurd amount.

Diameter Consistency

  • Diameter consistency for the 2022 Srixon Q-Star Tour falls within the Average range.
  • The size of the balls falls within the Average range relative to the market as a whole.

Compression Consistency

  • Compression consistency falls within the Average range.
  • Box 1 was perhaps slightly softer though compression was relatively consistent from box to box.
  • The compression delta across the entire sample was 7.8 which is above average.

True Price

True Price is how we quantify the quality of a golf ball. It's a projection of what you'd have to spend to ensure you get 12 good balls.

The True Price will always be equal to or greater than the retail price. The greater the difference between the retail price and the True Price, the more you should be concerned about the quality of the ball.

Srixon Q-Star Tour – Summary

To learn more about our test process, how we define “bad” balls and our True Price metric, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

The 2022 Srixon Q-Star Tour appears to be a significant improvement over the original model. On the heels of strong showing for the Z-Star Diamond, there’s reason to believe Srixon’s urethane lineup is on solid footing with respect to quality and consistency.

The Good

  • Significantly improved from the prior generation.
  • Solidly average for all of the metrics we track.

The Bad

  • Two bad balls in the sample.

At the time of review, the 2022 Srixon Q-Star Tour receives a Ball Lab score of 75. That’s two ticks better than the database average (73) at the time of testing.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Phil Williams

      1 year ago

      Ever try to hit half a ball MGS probably doesn’t have an x ray machine. Thank

      Reply

      R Jacobs

      1 year ago

      Playing the Wilson Triad mostly, but I did play the Titleist True Feel this week and was pleasantly surprised!

      Reply

      Henry R

      2 years ago

      The ball spreadsheet has a compression column for the samples’ consistency of compression., not measured compression. What I think many players would also like is a column on the actual measured compression.

      I am a 88 MPH slicer thinking tour-level higher compression balls I have been playing are hurting my game. Give us every tested ball we can rank by measured compression.

      I am assuming lower compression results in lower driver sidespin and less severe slice. Reduced slice is wayyy more important to me then short game backspin performance.

      Reply

      Rob B

      2 years ago

      They used to in all their reviews/labs…..not sure why they leave this out now. I too know about what compression I like in a ball (generally around mid-80s)….so I would like this info in these tests back as well.

      Reply

      Steve S

      2 years ago

      Glad to see they finally fixed their issues. Had problems with Q-stars from 4-5 years ago. Is the concentricity check a substitute for a balance test?(spinning balls in salt water)

      Reply

      Imafitter

      2 years ago

      I’ve been playing the Q-Star Tour for two years and it fits me well. My swing speed is in the 80’s, and I like the way they perform around the green. $35/dz is reasonable, but they do run 3 for 2 or BOGO from time to time. Let’s not forget the Callaway Chrome-Soft which were all core defective. And Callaway refused to exchange their balls. Lousy customer service.

      Reply

      David

      2 years ago

      I’m a MAXFI GUY
      This could be a second choice
      Price could sway me
      Surprising Bridgestone is so far down the list

      Reply

      Stevegp

      2 years ago

      It looks like one-third of the comments so far are from guys named Steve. Anyway, Tony, thank you for performing this test and sharing your analysis. I appreciate your efforts and I always look forward to the ball tests.
      Since others are making requests of which balls for you to examine, when the new Srixon Diamond is released, I, among others, would be interested in reading your test results. The other ball I would like to see you test is the Bridgestone Tour B X. I enjoy its performance, but I have read and heard comments about the ball’s durability and a few performance quirks. I’m curious if there is a correlation to its quality of manufacture.

      Reply

      Steve S.

      2 years ago

      Tony, can you do a ball lab test on the Srixon Qstar Tour Divide ball, whether or not it’s the previous release or the 2022 version for us old guys with under 90mph swing speeds ? I choose this ball for two reasons. For alignment while putting and it’s easier to follow (visually see) the ball flight off the tee.

      Reply

      Owen

      2 years ago

      YES! Please review the Q-Star Tour Divide.

      I love the two-tone for putting alignment and easy identification for when I hit it in the woods.

      The different color options are cool too. Srixon nailed it with that ball.

      Reply

      Peejer

      2 years ago

      My first thought was – is there any difference between this Q-Star Tour and the Q-Star Tour Divide? Is it only a paint-job difference? My logic says yes, since it’s the same name, but one never really knows until MGS says so!

      Tony

      2 years ago

      Thanks for the review. True price is not that helpful, the price is the price i.e. we don’t know which are bad balls, we use them all.
      What would be interesting to understand is how those bad balls perform i.e. distance, accuracy, roll (putting) vs a good ball. What is it costing us in terms of performance.

      Reply

      Tim

      2 years ago

      What a great suggestion “Tony”. I fully support this concept.

      Reply

      Randy

      2 years ago

      My usual gamer is the q-star tour divide, I wonder if there is any discrepancy between the quality since they are both q-star tours but definitely have different processes for the cover.

      Reply

      Ramesh Singh

      2 years ago

      Hi Tony, would really appreciate it if you could run a lab test on Foremost’s company made golf balls. Ie: their 3&4 layer golf balls. They are somewhat a “dtc” golf balls available for purchase online. I have been gaming these balls recently and would appreciate a specialist (ie: your) view of them. Thank you.

      Reply

      Steve

      2 years ago

      My wife, over 70, has had the best golf of her life with the Srixon Q star tour. A 19 handicap golfer that can spin the ball into the green form as close as 40 yards (her 60 degree full shot). . The only other ball she has used is the pink Callaway super-soft which will not spin and stop for her.

      Reply

      Mark R

      2 years ago

      My current gamer is the Tour Response. The Tour Response simply works better for my swing speed than a Pro V1..

      The $0.42 / ball lower price point for Srixon Q-Star Tour is certainly not enough incentive to go from a 93 rated ball to a 75 rated ball.

      Reply

      Mike

      1 year ago

      This comment didn’t age well, I was all over the Tour Response until they retailed for 55 Canadian/Dozen…..

      Reply

      Cliff

      2 years ago

      Can we get some Trust golf balls tested? I’ve seen these before and also saw a post about them in the forum earlier today.

      Reply

      Irish Assassin

      2 years ago

      For years I used one type of ball, golf galaxy offered a ball fitting, it’s not expensive and after the fitting if you purchase the balls that work best for you that fee goes towards the balls. Have to purchase a box of twelve not a sleeve.
      So I thought what the hell, it’s free then in my mind.
      I was shocked after hitting all the named brands and some not so mentioned ones that the results on the simulator showed a different brand, so I trusted the process and purchased the balls.
      Haven’t looked back since, can’t believe how many strokes it had saved me.

      Reply

      Buz Barlow

      2 years ago

      What golf ball are you playing?

      Reply

      Irish Assassin

      2 years ago

      Srixon Z Star Skin Spin.
      Had to get used to the amount of spin and stop this balls has on green side and approach shots.

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