Ball Lab: Titleist Pro V1 Review
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Ball Lab: Titleist Pro V1 Review

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Ball Lab: Titleist Pro V1 Review

MyGolfSpy Ball Lab is where we quantify the quality and consistency of the golf balls on the market to help you find the best ball for your money. Today we’re evaluating the Titleist Pro V1. For more information, visit our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

About the Titleist Pro V1

By any reasonable measure, the Titleist Pro V1 is the #1 Ball in Golf. Individually, it’s the best-selling ball at retail and it, along with the Pro V1x, is the most played ball on the PGA TOUR. As it happens, it’s also now the top-ranked ball in Ball Lab.

Sorry if that spoils the surprise.

Filed under The More You Know … Titleist confused more than a few golfers when it swapped the profiles of the Pro V1 and Pro V1x several years ago, so it’s worth clarifying where the standard Pro V1 fits within the Titleist premium urethane lineup. Titleist classifies Pro V1 as a mid-trajectory, mid-spin ball. That’s largely true, relative to the ball market as a whole, though I’d argue the Pro V1 is perhaps just a tick lower than “mid” for both metrics.

On a comparative basis, the Pro V1x flies higher and spins more while AVX flies lower and spins less. AVX is also considerably softer. The “left” options confuse things just a bit but what’s worth remembering is that whether we’re talking about the limited-run Pro V1 Left Dot or the Pro V1x Left Dash, both fly similarly with less spin than their mainstream counterparts.

The 2021 version of the Pro V1 is a three-piece ball with 388 dimples. While under normal circumstances the overwhelming majority of Pro V1s sold in the U.S. are produced at the company’s Ball Plant 3 with demand outpacing production capabilities, it’s not uncommon to find balls made at Ball Plant 4 in Thailand on shelves.

As always, we purchased balls over the span of several months. Our first two dozen were produced at Ball Plant 3 while the third dozen came from Ball Plant 4.

Titleist Pro V1 — Compression

On our gauges, the Titleist Pro V1 has a compression of 87. While that’s three points softer than we measured the previous version, across the market as a whole, it’s still solidly within the firm category (though it is a bit on the softer side for a ball played on Tour). As you might expect, given the popularity of the Pro V1, nearly every company that makes a urethane-covered ball makes one in the +/- 90-compression range.

Titleist Pro V1 — Diameter and Weight

It’s not particularly surprising that we found no issues with either roundness or conformance to the USGA rules for weight. To date, we’ve measured 30 dozen Titleist golf balls across 10 different models. We’ve yet to find a single ball that’s over the weight limit and have only measured one ball (a TrueFeel) that failed to meet our standard for roundness.

Titleist Pro V1 — Inspection

Our visual inspection found no significant issues.

Centeredness and Concentricity

As is common, we found a couple of balls with slightly inconsistent mantle thickness but no significant concentricity issues were found.

a photo of the core of the Titleist Pro V1 golf ball

Core Consistency

There was appreciable color variation between the U.S.- and Thailand-produced balls but no inconsistencies (chunks, debris, etc.) were noted within the mix. Core color variation is not uncommon and typically no cause for concern. When there is variation, we defer to the gauges.

Cover

While we did note some pin marks left over from the painting process, we found no notable cover damage.

Titleist Pro V1 — Consistency

In this section, we detail the consistency of the Titleist Pro V1. While the above sections largely evaluate conformance to USGA rules, our consistency metrics provide a measure of how similar the balls in our sample are to one another relative to all of the models we’ve tested to date.

Titleist Pro V1 – One Ball At a Time

The chart below shows the weight, diameter and compression measurements for each of the balls in our Titleist Pro V1 sample.

a ball by ball consistency chart for the 2021 Titleist Pro V1

Weight Consistency

  • Weight consistency for the Pro V1 was within the average range.
  • While the balls were produced at different factories, Box 2 and Box 3 were most similar.

Diameter Consistency

  • Diameter was generally consistent from box to box with no indication of significant variation between factories.
  • Overall, the weight consistency of the Titleist Pro V1 falls within the good range.

Compression Consistency

  • For our total compression consistency metric, the Titleist Pro V1 rates as excellent—the only ball in our database to achieve the rating.
  • Looking at the average compression in the sample, the Titleist Pro V1 rates as Good.
  • Comparing the compression deltas (the difference in compression across the three points measured on each ball), the Titleist Pro V1 again rates as Good.
  • None of the balls in the sample had a compression delta greater than 2.5 compression points.
  • Despite the balls being produced in different factories, we found no appreciable difference in average compression across the sample.

Titleist Pro V1  — Summary

To learn more about our test process, how we define “bad” balls, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

The Good

  • The most consistent ball tested to date in Ball Lab.
  • The only ball thus far to achieve an Excellent rating for total compression consistency.
  • No significant defects within our sample.
  • 100 percent of the sample conforms to USGA rules.

The Bad

  • At $49.99, the Titleist Pro V1 is the most expensive ball on the market from a major manufacturer.

Titleist Pro V1 — Final Grade

The Titleist Pro V1 golf ball gets an overall grade of 97.

The score is the highest we’ve recorded so far with the Excellent rating for compression consistency pushing it past the others.

To an extent, this is what golfers should expect given the $49.99 price point and Titleist’s emphasis on quality and consistency.

An overview of the equipment we use can be found here. To learn more about our test process, how we define “bad” balls and our True Price metric, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Doc Zortman

      2 years ago

      Would be interesting to see a comparison of the Pro V year to year, model to model… Looking through my buckets of balls and probably 5 gallon of PV, just knowing what year model they are is one thing – but how they would compare with each other… Thanks

      Reply

      Simon Hague

      1 year ago

      I agree, this would be an interesting side by side – I’d also like to see if there is any variance between the white and the Yellow ball – The yellow one sounds “clickier” off of the putter but otherwise I can’t tell the difference but would be good to test

      Reply

      Imafitter

      2 years ago

      So this means that if a pro has a Srixon, TM, or Callaway hat, as those are the balls they play respectively, then those balls are JUNK! LOL!

      Reply

      Dan

      2 years ago

      Hi Tony,
      Would you/could you conclude that the yellow 2021 ProV1 has the same characteristics?
      Thanks

      Reply

      Richard

      2 years ago

      Is there any reason balls aren’t balance spun? You would think that this is no small ball flight parameter important especially to balls used by tour pro’s?

      Reply

      leftright

      3 years ago

      Maxfli Tour was the next brand ball below the Titleist at 85 with PV1 at 97. I guess you pay for what you get but I’m not a tour player but a low single digit 64 y/o. I buy the Maxfli tour at two dozen for $60.00 because I can and I play that ball but I do love Titleist also. It’s not the money but I can’t tell much difference. This also, because of my age reminds me of the old ball wars back in the later 60’s and 70’s between Maxfli and Titleist, at the time the best two premium balls for better players.

      Reply

      RT

      3 years ago

      My son gave me a sleeve of the AVX and it’s the best Titleist Ball to date…The Only draw back , 3 piece ball $50..00!!!
      No thanks I will stay with the Wilson pro or the Srixon AD 333 with spinskin.

      Reply

      Jagat Mehta

      3 years ago

      good Ball

      Reply

      Dr jagat mehta

      3 years ago

      great ball

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      It is a really nice piece of work you guys at MGS do with these ball labs. I had played Titleist years ago and went away from them to TM TPX5. Have played them for the past 5 or so years. However, needed to spend some proshop credit so I happened to pick up a dozen Titleist V1’s.. Quite a huge difference. Typically do not score in the 70’s. Within the last few rounds a 75, 79, and 78 yesterday., Dont know if there is much in it, but sure surprising.

      Reply

      JasonA

      3 years ago

      In Ireland the TITLEIST PRO V1 RRP is equivalent 69.67 USD. and only minor discount on sales.

      That’s a whole other value proposition when very good DTC urethane balls are USD 29.

      Reply

      Bill

      2 years ago

      Jasona I am with you. I really like the Seed golf ball SD-01 that is based in Ireland. Picked up 5 dozen for a steal of a price.

      Reply

      Alan

      3 years ago

      Ask engineers what process makes the most consistent ball? Compression mold (Titlest) or injection molded balls.?

      Reply

      RC

      3 years ago

      This article is one of the reasons I appreciate you MGS. I missed the fact that they switched the profiles of the V1 and the V1x, and when I played the Pro V’s, it sounds crazy, but I could tell it wasn’t performing the same for me. I’ve been playing them for 25 years (and have tried a bunch of others).

      Because of that feeling, I started playing the AVX, and it works for me, BUT, the reason I played Titleist is because the Pro V’s always scored very high on the actual manufacturing in terms of roundness, centering, etc., so I felt like I could trust that I wouldn’t get a bad ball in the box.

      Now I see that the one I’m playing, the AVX, didn’t score as high in those areas! Damn…

      Reply

      Lee

      3 years ago

      Dunno how you’ve been playing them for 25 years when the first Pro V only came out in 2001.

      Reply

      RC

      3 years ago

      So I played the first ones that came out – sorry I didn’t sit down with my calculator, but it felt like around 25 years – thanks for the math lesson.

      Frank Cacciola

      3 years ago

      when will MTB Black be tested

      Reply

      Rick

      3 years ago

      How can you figure out which plant the balls came from?

      Reply

      Damon

      3 years ago

      Hey Rick, it will say on each dozen on the side, each sleeve will also state where they are made. I have been known to go through all the boxes until I find made in Ball Plant 3 USA. If the store I’m at doesn’t have any, I got to a different store. Murica!

      Reply

      Tim Titleist

      3 years ago

      It’s printed on the box

      Reply

      John

      3 years ago

      There are only two plants in the world that manufacture PRO VI & PRO VIx, New Bedford, MA, and Thailand, and that’s raw materials to the finished balls packaged, warehoused, and shipped by Titleist staff.
      Unlike the other wannabe players like Snell, Callaway, Taylormade, etc., etc, Titleist makes all of our products and controls every aspect of the entire manufacturing process.

      Reply

      daryl kariniemi

      3 years ago

      I am an absolute tight-wad when it comes to golf ball spending but finally started buying ProV due to Golf Spy/Tony and my lost balls meter 0-2 per round. Thank you Tony and great work!

      Reply

      scott

      3 years ago

      After reading the article what your trying to say is. you get what you pay for. Or quality comes with a price.

      Reply

      JB

      3 years ago

      Thanks for that review. At least I know what I thought was true, is actually true. I learned my lesson from older Chrome Soft inconsistencies. Pro V1 for me.

      Reply

      Dave Horne

      3 years ago

      Thanks for all of the testing you do, it really brings in the reality of the industry as you show case the stars and the duds true stats.

      I have been playing the ProV1 left dot and loving it’s lower flight pattern and great spin action around the green. This ball is going farther and has great feel too.

      The other ball to try is the Left dash but I haven’t been able to get my hands on some yet.

      Keep up with your testing great for all of golfers to know the true facts so they can make smart choices.

      Reply

      Robert Dicks

      3 years ago

      Very in-depth test, as usual. Yes, a lot of manufacturers make very good balls and we are lucky to have such choice. But playing a Pro V1 gives me more confidence, which is a hard thing to measure. I think that’s another reason that it’s the best.

      Reply

      tim

      3 years ago

      WOULD LOVE A LEFT DOT review……its simply the best ball ive ever hit……..and for me the CSX isnt really “high spinning” off the driver, but into and around the greens it is…..great ball if you are not playing titleist

      Reply

      mackdaddy9

      3 years ago

      I agree

      Reply

      Randy

      3 years ago

      Did you see any notable difference between the balls produced at Ball Plant 3 versus Ball Plant 4 ?

      Reply

      John

      3 years ago

      There is no difference in VI & VIX manufactured in MA or in Thailand, the same raw materials are used, the same equipment, machines, quality specifications, and the number of quality checks are the same regardless of whether they are made in Thailand or in MA.
      The Thailand plant was built to supply the European & Asian markets.

      Reply

      LOWEBOY

      3 years ago

      Stopped played Pro-V’s 11 years ago. Now if I find them they become water balls or I just leave them there on the ground.

      Reply

      Bill

      3 years ago

      Why?

      Reply

      rick

      3 years ago

      good for you, you must be better than even the pros! yawn

      Reply

      John Connery

      3 years ago

      I am confused. When you compare the lab ball tests
      compared with the actual performance of golf balls there seems to be significant differences.
      I am a mid speed swing and play the BRX which
      was a top ball in the performance category but only gets a score of 57 in the lab test.
      I understand the two tests measure different things,
      but if generally speaking a ball performance is very good why pay much attention to the lab results other than I will have a few balls that are not perfect?

      Reply

      Tyler

      3 years ago

      The key difference lies in what you’re comparing with those 2 tests:

      Ball lab is checking for quality and consistency from ball to ball, or dozen to dozen. If the ball scores low on ball lab metrics you have a high chance of having a “bad” ball, or a worse off ball (off center, bad cover, inconsistent compression, etc.). A poorly made ball could cause it to perform poorly as well depending on the defect.

      The ball performance category tests a “good” ball against competition/manufacturer claims. A ball that lives up to the claims, or stands up against the competition and hits all the performance metrics (spin, flight, feel, durability, etc.) will score highly.

      It’s not unrealistic to see a discrepancy in either direction regarding performance vs. ball lab results. Just as a ball can have incredible ratings in a performance test, but subpar ball lab results (good ball on the course, but you have a % of bad balls/inconsistent balls per dozen), you could also have a ball that has terrible performance test ratings, but be incredibly consistent (poor performing ball on the course, but little to no bad balls/inconsistent balls per dozen).

      Reply

      TR1PTIK

      3 years ago

      Put simply, Most Wanted testing shows performance, Ball Lab shows quality and consistency of the manufacturing process. If you don’t care much about the possibility of putting a poorly constructed ball in play, then don’t worry about it.

      Reply

      Tyler

      3 years ago

      Using your BRX ball and the PROV1 as an example:

      Your BRX performs very well, but only a certain % of the balls will perform as well as you expect. Some may have some decrease distance, spin, off-center lines, etc. If you feel you hit one dead center and it should have carried 20, 30 or more yards than it did, or ended up straighter and more on target, it may well have been the ball defects that just cost you that distance or off line accuracy.

      The PROV1 performs very well, and does so an extremely high % of the time. (If not every ball). In turn, every shot should behave the same (assuming you hit every shot how you want. Lol.) and leaves the only variable as you the golfer. Takes a degree of guess work out of the equation.

      For me, it boils down to wether or not the defects are something I will notice in my gameplay (high handicapper, most likely not, low handicapper almost definitely), and if it justifies the price.

      If I’m paying $50 or so a dozen, I most certainly want all those balls to be within a very small margin of error.

      If I’m paying $25, $30, $35 or so a dozen, I may or may not be ok with a few bad balls.

      Just comes down to your comfort point and what you’re willing to give or take on. Price? Performance? Either way, ball lab and performance results give you the data to make those decisions. And I know I’m incredibly thankful for that.

      Reply

      Randy

      3 years ago

      Really glad I picked up 4 dozen of these from lost golfballs

      Reply

      Rob

      3 years ago

      No surprise here.

      The only “bad” thing about it is being the most expensive ball on the market. Well I would expect to pay the most for the best and highest quality of anything in any market. As a wise person once said, “you get what you pay for” Never more true than with this.

      Reply

      Aart van der Molen

      3 years ago

      Ball #1-#6 in this ranking all by Titleist, so we should not buy anything else….?

      Is there a time (or other bias) in the testing or scoring?

      Interesting to re-test all #1-10 balls on a same day with same testers?
      Maybe not only in the lab, but also in the practice grounds outside ?

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      3 years ago

      What we’ve found in the lab is that Titleist makes the most consistent golf ball product in the market right now. I think it’s telling that a model that’s below average by Titleist standards still falls within the average range across the market. That said, while I’d have a hard time making an argument for a ball that lands below the average range, I think there are performance reasons why golfers might choose something other than Titleist. With the 4 premium balls (Pro V1, Pro V1x, AVX, and Pro V1x Left Dash), Titleist covers a good portion of the market, but certainly not all of it.

      For example, in the soft-ish space, AVX is lower launching and lower spinning that a lot of golfers are looking for. While Pro V1x is a higher spinning ball, it’s definitely not as high spinning as some others. If you’re looking to really crank up spin, TP5 or Chrome Soft X might be a better performance option. The Kirklands are an option if you don’t spin the ball at all. There are lots of nuanced examples where the space in-between a Titleist ball *might* provide more optimal performance. When it comes to consistency, however, Titleist is tough to beat…especially when looking at the totality of a ball lineup.

      If you haven’t seen it, we did do a robot test this year to help golfers better understand the performance differences between balls. You can find that here: http://mygolfspy.com/best-golf-balls-2021/http://mygolfspy.com/best-golf-balls-2021/

      Reply

      Richard

      2 years ago

      I use a ball spinner the Check Go Pro, most of the balls I use don’t spin up to the manufactures direction logo! I have notice with this years version of the Pro V1/1X a higher percentage of the balls seem to spin up on or close to the direction logo!

      Ryan

      3 years ago

      These are not “most wanted” test results from players like they do for clubs. These are physical measurements of the balls using various pieces of equipment, all done by Tony.

      Reply

      Tom

      3 years ago

      I suppose you could look to professional players on the PGA Tour, European Tour, LPGA Tour, Korn Ferry Tour, PGA Tour Champions, PGA Latinoamerica Tour, PGA China Tour, Canadian Tour or any other major world wide tour at any event to find the “most wanted” golf ball.

      Don Derova

      3 years ago

      Certainly looks like you get what you pay for. Definitely a must-buy once it’s on sale.

      Reply

      Steven M.

      3 years ago

      Would love to see an update on the latest Kirkland V.2 ball!

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      3 years ago

      It’s in the pipeline. Robot test showed that it’s super-spinny, but same data suggests the ball is a consistent performer. Definitely couldn’t say that about the first one.

      Reply

      Richard

      2 years ago

      I saw recently where Kirkland was made by Callaway.

      Reply

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