Cobra Launches KING ONE Length Irons
Irons

Cobra Launches KING ONE Length Irons

Cobra Launches KING ONE Length Irons

A couple weeks back Cobra announced its KING Oversized iron. Today it adds to its 2017 lineup with the introduction of 2 additional models. Actually, we could make a case that it’s actually 4 new models.

Blame Bryson DeChambeau.

Cobra’s story… likely Cobra’s big story for 2017 is the DeChambeau-inspired single length irons sets. As Cobra’s VP of R&D, Tom Olsavsky, suggested, you can easily make an argument that single length irons were the biggest equipment story of 2016 with no sales.

Beginning with today’s announcement, Cobra hopes to change that.

cobra-one-length-3

The irons we’re focusing on today are the KING F7 ONE and the KING FORGED ONE, and given all the buzz around DeChambeau and his unorthodox approach to the golf swing and the equipment, it should come as no surprise that both irons will be available in single, or ONE, length sets.

In the interest of getting you up to speed with the new lingo, I should also tell you that both sets are also available in variable length as well. Previously we wouldn’t have mentioned length type at all, and you rightfully would have assumed that the irons were regular, or normal length, but this is a new world, people. Normal is now called variable length. Embrace it.

cobra-one-length-14

A Very Brief History of Single Length Irons

Let’s begin with just a bit of background. Single length irons aren’t new. In the days of wooden shafts, single length was the standard. When steel became the new standard, single length fell out of favor. Tommy Armour revived single length in the late eighties and early nineties. The company was #1 at the time, and single length was never really its focus. The Tommy Armour sets suffered from unresolved gapping issues, and as Titleist, Hogan, Callaway, and Cobra emerged as market forces – usurping Tommy Armour – single length irons all but disappeared from the mainstream market.

More recently, largely unknown 1IronGolf has offered single-length sets for the last several years. And as many of you know, earlier this year Tom Wishon also entered the single-length retail market under the Sterling brand.

Cobra is raising the stakes further by becoming the first major OEM to bring the concept back to the mainstream market. Cobra isn’t just making single length irons; it’s making them the focus of its 2017 lineup.

To that end, in addition to a pair of variable length F7 offerings, the company has announced two models of single length irons under (the) ONE umbrella.

KING F7 ONE LENGTH

cobra-one-length-18

For the game-improvement crowd, specifically those looking not just for more distance, but more consistent distance, there’s the KING F7 ONE Length.

On the technology side, the F7 ONE is the evolution of last season’s F6 iron. Consider it a subtle refinement of what is quietly a very good iron. Key technologies include:

TECFLO – Described in simple terms as technology that flows through the set, TECFLO offers progressive cavity construction designed to optimize the performance of each iron in the set. Basically, the long, middle, and short irons are designed differently and perform differently.

PWRSHELL – Thinner and stronger face structures with welds placed farther from the face allow for a larger sweet zone with higher ball speeds on mis-hits. It’s not dissimilar from Callaway’s FaceCup technology.

T.O.P. Technology – Cobra-speak for the aluminum body caps that free up discretionary weight (compared to steel), which is then placed… wait for it… low and back.

Progressive Spin Technology – V-Grooves in the long iron for lower spin and more distance. U-Grooves in the middle irons for optimal trajectory, and wedge spaced grooves for more spin and precise control in the scoring irons.

Also worth mentioning, both F7 sets feature 100% CNC milled grooves, a rarity in the cast game-improvement space.

The sum total of the technology is a game-improvement iron that builds on the F6 platform to provide the added distance that retailers like to see (2.6 yards in the variable length 5 iron) and the greater distance consistency that golfers have asked for.

KING Forged ONE Length

cobra-one-length-2

As you’d expect from a more player-centric club, the laundry list of technology isn’t quite as deep with the Forged ONE.

The KING Forged One leverages Cobra’s 5-step forging process, which in addition to yielding tighter tolerances, creates a tighter grain structure for outstanding feel.

Like the KING F7 One, the KING Forged ONE offers CNC milled faces and grooves. Tungsten weighting in the 4i-7i to help drive the CG low, and a Thermoplastic Polyurethane Insert (TPU) in the 4i-8i that improves feel and helps distribute weight to the perimeter.

For those interested in such things, the KING Forged ONE is the iron that Bryson DeChambeau has in his bag.

The Deep Dive

Having spent nearly 6 hours in a room with members of Cobra’s R&D team being stepped through the 2017 lineup, I can tell you that the company is completely committed to the single length concept, and that has me more than a little intrigued by these ONE Length offerings.

As you may recall, Cobra made a significant investment in Bryson DeChambeau. I might have suggested there was an element of dice-rolling in play with the signing, but with DeChambeau having earned his tour card, he’s in prime position to make an impact, and Cobra believes that puts it in prime position to make an impact as well.

Company insiders believe DeChambeau has the potential to be one of the best players in the world, if not THE best. A quick look at his ball striking stats suggest there could be something to that. Keep in mind that, in his win at Hilton Head, he gained 10 strokes on the field with his approach shots. If that type of strong play continues, if his potential is realized, expect ONE to be at the forefront of Cobra’s offerings for years to come.

cobra-one-length-9

The ONE Length FAQ

During the presentation, my time on the range, and on the course, I had questions (and observations), and I’m sure you have questions too. So rather than treat this like a standard product release article, I’m going to be bold and try and anticipate your questions.

Here we go:

1. What are the benefits of ONE Length irons?

In theory – and in Cobra testing – the answer can be summed up in a single word: Consistency.

When your irons are all one length (for Cobra’s 2017 lineup, that means 7-iron length), your 5-iron swing is the same as your pitching wedge swing. A more consistent setup should lead to more consistent results. That makes sense.

“If we can make you more consistent, you’re going to hit it better.” – Tom Olsavsky

In one test case, Cobra sites a mid single-digit handicap golfer who went from a 20% success (good shot vs. not so good – we’ve all been there) to an 80% success rate with his 4-iron. All he did was switch to single length clubs.

Take a look at these impact patterns. This testing was done by GEARS Golf. Club order was randomized… basically they tested the way we would test, and the results suggest much greater consistency with the ONE Length long and middle irons.

gears-5 gears-8

Consistency is great, but there’s also an argument to be made that ONE Length is better for those of us suffering from back ailments, or anything else that makes that extra bending over that comes with hitting short irons and wedges more uncomfortable.

“We don’t want to say it’s for the old and decrepit, but people play golf for fun, and if it hurts when you’re playing golf, that’s not fun.” –Tom Olsavsky

Playing with a bit less pain should make the game more enjoyable. I’d call that a benefit too.

2. Do I need to swing like Bryson DeChambeau to play ONE Length irons?

Nope.

Bryson’s lie angles are 73°. That’s probably not going to work for you, and Cobra has accounted for that.

While Bryson is known for his one-plane swing, nobody expects you to swing it like Bryson. Cobra’s ONE Length Irons are just as suitable for two plane swingers – and that’s most of us.

You still need to be fit to find the proper lie angle, but it shouldn’t be much, if any, different than what’s in your bag now.

cobra-one-length-11

3. Will I lose distance with ONE Length Irons?

Probably not.

While individual mileage always varies, Cobra has gone to extraordinary lengths to ensure there are no distance penalties with ONE Length irons. In fact, ONE is the most tested iron in the history of Cobra Golf.

First, remember that distance is driven primarily by loft. It’s why loft jacking is all the rage. We also know that, when it comes to iron length, shorter is often… well, shorter.

During its research, Cobra learned that ½” in shaft length equates to about 1.2 yards of distance. All other factors being equal, with the jump from a 7 iron to 6 iron, we’re not talking about that much of a distance penalty.  Step from the 7 to the 5 or the 4, well, now you’re going to have distance and gapping issue. No worries, though, Cobra sorted that out too.

Cobra’s engineers got most of the distance back by simply putting weight back into the head (for consistent swing weight you need to add weight to the long iron heads to offset the loss in shaft length). By lowering the center of gravity, Cobra got even more distance back.

The end result is basically equivalent distance between the variable length KING F7 and the KING F7 ONE Length.

I should also mention that Cobra put an exhaustive amount of work into ensuring that the gapping within ONE Length sets was as good, or better than any variable length set on the market today.

Short answer – there are no distance or gapping issues for you to fret over.

king-f7-techflo-construction

4. What about the short irons?

What a great question. Thanks for asking.

With the short irons, Cobra had basically the opposite problem; too much weight. To fix it, Cobra actually had to remove weight from the short irons. This is most notable in the unique cavity design of the wedges.

What you’re left with on a comparative basis with variable length F7 are higher launching, more forgiving long irons, and lower launching, higher spinning wedges. All of that is attributable to differences in CG (Center of Gravity) locations between the ONE Length and variable length sets.

What’s interesting and arguably counterintuitive; results from that same GEARS test I referenced above suggests that, despite comparatively longer shafts in the scoring clubs, golfers are actually more consistent with ONE Length short irons as well.

gears-gap

Again… that consistency plays right into the marketing message. ONE Length. One Swing.

The suggestion is that consistency in one area (length) yields consistency in another (ball striking).

5. What about metalwoods? Are those single lengths too?

For now, at least, no. While Cobra will no doubt continue to investigate the viability of single-length clubs at the top of the bag, ONE Length adopters will continue to play variable length metalwoods.

6. Should I play ONE Length Wedges?

It depends. Cobra’s Tom Olsavsky believes that strong wedge players might be best served sticking with what they have. You already have a great short game, why mess with it?

Golfers who need help, however, may want to consider adding Cobra ONE Length wedges (56° & 60° available through custom order) to their sets.

Once again, the argument is consistency.

For now, only a single bounce/grind option will be available in each loft. If consumer demand is high enough, Cobra could add more options.

cobra-one-length-1

7. Won’t fitting be a problem?

It shouldn’t be. To make things as easy as possible for fitters, and to help golfers better realize the potential of ONE Length irons, Cobra’s 2017 fitting carts will include a 5, 7, and 9-iron. This will give golfers a taste of what it’s like hitting ONE Length in the middle of, as well as near the outer edges of the set.

Basically, it’s a confidence play to help golfers understand that the concept works as well in practice as it does on paper.

cobra-one-length-10

8. Is it weird playing with ONE Length Irons? What are the potential issues?

I cheated. That’s two questions. The answer to the first is most definitely yes.

The Cobra guys tried to talk me through it by frequently repeating “7-iron swing”. It’s sage advice, but avid golfers may find themselves fighting a mental battle when presented with 7-iron length and 5-iron loft. We’ve been playing this game a while, and we’ve come to expect our lofts to present with a certain amount of length attached to the handle. For some, myself included, decoupling length and loft may pose a bit of a mental challenge.

In my case, I struggled to get over the mental block of over-swinging the 5-iron. The R&D guys tell me that all I have to do is trust it and it will go as far as a conventional 5-iron. I do trust them, but initially my confidence in the team did little to dissuade me from swinging out of my shoes.

That said, even flailing a bit whilst trying to force what in my mind is a 7-iron to go 5-iron distance, I did notice much more consistent impact pattern on the face than I’d typical see with my own 5-iron.

With the wedges, the mental block was the opposite. I found myself fighting a tendency to under-swing, because, well, if I take my 7-iron swing with this extra-long wedge, it’s going to fly too far.

Nope.

cobra-one-length-13

For avid golfers, it will likely take time to recondition the mind. Even with the mental issues, impact patterns were consistent, despite the longer shaft length. That’s intriguing for sure.

What surprised me most was how comfortable I got pitching and chipping with longer than standard wedges. It’s a bit like shaking off winter’s rust. It takes a few reps to recondition the feel (it’s a process), but once you have it, you have it. No need to give it any more thought.

Where I struggled mightily was with open-faced shots, particularly from greenside bunkers. There’s a 90% chance it was 100% a mental block. That could suggest that the 56° and 60° wedges are where this single length thing might get a little too weird for many of us. Still, I’m going to have another go at it and see if it gets any better.

cobra-one-length-20

9. Who are ONE Length irons for?

Potentially everybody. More realistically, my early impression is that ONE Length is a serious option for anyone who needs help with iron consistency.

ONE Length should certainly be considered for beginning golfers as well. Single length irons reduce the complexity of the iron game and with it, the overall learning curve.

Honestly, I was disappointed to learn that ONE Length irons won’t yet be available for women (yet). With my wife threatening to pick up the game, I believe ONE Length would make the learning process more enjoyable.

And yeah…there is a legitimate case to be made for seniors and anyone else who might be suffering from a physical problem that makes swinging shorter irons uncomfortable.

cobra-one-length-16

10. Is anybody actually going to buy these things?

Yes. I think. Maybe.

Ultimately the consumer adoption rate could be tied to Bryson DeChambeau’s success on Tour. I’d wager there isn’t another product on the market for which retail success is so inextricably tied to a single player. If DeChambeau starts winning and winning often, we’ll likely see tour adoption increase, and ONE Length may very well be the next big thing.

“If this becomes the hot thing like I’ve seen other hot things in the business, we’re going to run out.” –Tom Olsavsky

If that doesn’t happen, you can probably toss ONE Length in the pile of potentially good ideas that never quite went mainstream. It certainly appears Cobra has plenty riding on Bryson DeChambeau’s success.

cobra-one-length-22

As for Cobra’s competitors, we’re not aware of anyone else with single length irons in the immediate pipeline. Olsavsky told me he wouldn’t be surprised if somebody introduced a set at the show. If I had to wager, I’d be on PING, but it also wouldn’t surprise me if rest of the industry collectively takes a wait and see approach.

With all of that said, as the calendar turns towards 2017, I can honestly tell you that ONE Length is the new iron product I’m most excited about (at least so far). It has real potential to help golfers lower their scores… you just have to be willing to give them a try.

I definitely will.

Variable Length Too

king_forged_tour_stock

For those looking for a more conventional set of irons, both the KING F7 and KING Forged Tour will be available in variable length sets. Physically, the head profiles are identical to their ONE Length alternatives, though as you’d expect, the internal weighting is in-line with other standard offerings. Otherwise, the same technology is baked in.

While ONE Length irons feature red, white, and blue badging, medallions in the variable length sets feature Cobra’s signature orange and black.

f7-stock

Pricing, Specs, and Availability

KING F7 ONE

king-f7-one

  • Stock Set Makeup: 5-GW ($100 per additional iron)
  • Stock Shafts: True Temper KING F7 (steel), Fujikura Pro 63i (graphite)
  • Stock Grips: Lamkin REL-Blue with Red & White Accents
  • Dexterity: Available for both Right and Left handed golfers
  • Retail Price (7-piece set): $699 steel; $799 graphite

KING F7

king-f7-spec

  • Stock Set Makeup: 5-GW and 4-5H, 6-GW
  • Stock Shafts: True Temper KING F7 (steel), Fujikura Pro 63i (graphite)
  • Stock Grips: Lamkin REL-Black
  • Dexterity: Available for both Right and Left handed golfers
  • Retail Price: $699 (7-piece steel), $799 graphite (available through custom only), $799 (combo set, steel), $899 (combo set, graphite)
  • Women’s combo set also available for $899

KING FORGED ONE LENGTH

forged-one-spec

  • Stock Set Makeup: 4-PW (56° and 60° wedges available for $119 each)
  • Stock Shafts: KBS TOUR FLT (120g stiff; 110 regular)
  • Stock Grips: Lamkin REL-Blue with Red & White Accents
  • Dexterity: Right-hand only
  • Retail Price: $999

KING FORGED TOUR

king-forged-specs

  • Stock Set Makeup: 4-PW (3i and GW available through custom)
  • Stock Shafts: KBS TOUR FLT (120g stiff; 110 regular)
  • Stock Grips: Lamkin REL-Black
  • Dexterity: Right-hand only
  • Retail Price: $999

cobra-one-length-15

Retail availability for all sets begins 1/13/2017

For more information, visit CobraGolf.com

 

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

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Tony Covey

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      Hazen

      7 years ago

      I’m so interested in giving these a try. With back issues (US Army days). I think the one length would help me since the 7 iron setup seems to be the best position for my back pain.

      The biggest upside to this, for me anyway, is not having that much free time for hitting the range. With the one length, I can just toss one of the irons in the car, sneak away to the range when I can and only have to worry about perfecting one swing ( when working on my irons only of course).

      Reply

      Sean

      7 years ago

      Just heard a pod cast from edel golf where he said single length irons don’t work with conventional steel shafts and he used graphite shafts with different fibre tensions in the short irons to stop the ball flight from balooning.
      So how do cobra manage it?
      Link: Listen to The Truth About SINGLE LENGTH IRONS w/ David Edel by Golf Science Lab #np on #SoundCloud
      https://soundcloud.com/golf-science-lab/the-details-about-single-length-irons-w-david-edel

      Reply

      Tedd Branstetter

      8 years ago

      The only reason they’ve done this is because Bryson DeChambeau is on the payroll now, and that’s the only reason, it’s all about marketing and chasing dollars!

      Reply

      Rick H

      7 years ago

      No, actually, having built a “proof-of-concept” set of Pinhawks while waiting for the Cobras, I can report that “field tests” in Arizona, Indiana, and New Hampshire show that this approach really, really works–after a couple of months of adjustment. Bobby Jones used “single length” clubs, as did others in his day. It’s a great, time-tested idea. As a former adman, I can say that this is not about marketing; it’s about golfing.

      Reply

      Andrew Crawford

      8 years ago

      I took 4 inches off my driver and hit it longer and straighter now. I could see this being good for my game!

      Reply

      Bo Christensen

      8 years ago

      Tested this, No good for me, don’t right to stand over. We take me over a year or longer to play at my handicap…… If I ever come down to that

      Reply

      Chad Mardesen

      8 years ago

      Something oddly familiar with these….can’t put my finger on it…it’s like I’ve seen them somewhere before in red…

      Reply

      Michel Weedfald

      8 years ago

      Is that even a clubmaking Company ?

      Reply

      Chad Mardesen

      8 years ago

      Not anymore. Maybe their ideas are fair game now as a result?

      Reply

      James Turner

      8 years ago

      I would give a try

      Reply

      Alex Holt

      8 years ago

      Interesting concept, what I would really like to see is something in between. I think ending with a 4 iron of 37.75 and going to a gap wedge of 36 would have been a more successful product launch. It helps lower any hesitation consumers might have about making the leap. This way you still get some of the benefits of a more consistent swing without having to drastically change the swing you are used to. I would imagine if these irons are successful my concept may turn reality as other manufacturers offer their variations of this idea. Guess I will have to hold on to my x2hots for now and wait and see.

      Reply

      jandkw

      8 years ago

      Always enjoy your article, Tony. The 1-length concept has been on my mind for quite some time due to my inconsistent iron shots. I’m 5’7″ and have issue to consistently hit down the ball when it comes to hitting 4, 5 and 6 irons. I finally gave up the 4i and replaced by the hybrid although my hybrid hit is not as straight as my iron shot. My 5i and 6i hits are not that much longer than my 7i so I have a big gaping problem. I definitely will try the Cobra 1-length clubs when available in Spring. My thought is to keep my current wedges since my chipping game is fairly good and consistent.

      Reply

      Scott

      8 years ago

      I’m going to give these a shot when they come out. I’m curious to see what the guy fitting me says. I’m 6’5″ and my current set is
      1″ over length and 2* upright. That would make the entire set about the length of my current 9 iron. I wonder if they’ll fit me with similar specs or if there’s a performance limit based of the way these are weighted? Any thoughts?

      Reply

      todd

      7 years ago

      Did you get these? How is it going if you did?

      Reply

      Magnus Henricson

      8 years ago

      Lovely to see that cobra makes a better players iron set with less or no offset!

      Reply

      Martin Chuck

      8 years ago

      I have the forged set and the F7 set. Haven’t played or tested the F7 set yet. So far, I’m loving the Forged One Length set. Super solid feel with gapping that matches my normal gamers pretty closely. Here’s a video example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFwi_BjYhL0. Tony, I “borrowed” one of your photos for the thumb nail:) – MC

      Reply

      Michael Schurman

      8 years ago

      There was a theory that the trajectory of every properly fitted iron went to the same height/apex. Each successive iron hit the ball on a lower trajectory but a bit further until it reached the same height as the iron before it. When you add length to a short iron the ball will rise to a higher apex and when you shorten the shaft you’d get a lower apex. Won’t these single length clubs hit the ball too high with the short irons and too low with the long irons?

      To counteract this problem you would have to decrease the loft and weight in the short irons and increase the same in the long irons assuming each club has the same lie. Eventually, if you made these changes wouldn’t you end up with each club head being exactly the same size and shape but with a different loft? This would mean the only variable remaining to control the flight exclusive of weight and loft would be weight distribution. Given the clubs are the same length, swing weight, grip size and dead weight they sure will be easy to frequency match.

      Reply

      KeyserSoze

      8 years ago

      I think a two-length system for 3i/3h thru LW would work better because most people would combine a single-length iron/hybrid set with standard-length wedges anyway. I would prefer my 3i/3h thru 7i to be 37 inches (7i length) and 8i thru LW to be 36 inches (9i length).

      Reply

      Tip Spata

      8 years ago

      Why not have standard length irons for 8-LW, but have your 4-7 irons the same length?

      Reply

      Bert Pit

      8 years ago

      When I started to play golf 4 years ago, I wondered why all the clubs had a different length. But golfers love tradition and they lover their clubs, but for me it was a no brainer. I think the single length clubs could make the game easier. That’s where I, as a weekend hacker ‘m looking for. In addition, it is currently a unique product of Cobra. I know there are small suppliers who have them. But the uniqueness of the proposition is that customers can make two choices: single length (cobra) or any other club. I think from Cobra’s point of view thats a fairly good proposition.

      (Bert Pit, from Holland)

      Reply

      Cale

      8 years ago

      Great article Tony! Really looking forward to seeing these in person, especially the forged model. Surprised you didn’t mention the Pinhawks in your article though – I read they are coming out with left handed, so they must be selling a ton. I love mine!

      Reply

      GilB

      8 years ago

      Very interesting and enlightening article. I’d be very interested in trying these clubs out even though looking down at the wedge loft at a seven length would take some getting used to.

      Reply

      Casey Floyd

      8 years ago

      It does mean that this year’s Cobra King Pro irons will go way down in price soon ;)

      Reply

      Tom Philbin

      8 years ago

      Nope! it’s not in the spirit of the game. Simples!!

      Reply

      Casey Floyd

      8 years ago

      I want them

      Reply

      Courtney Floyd

      8 years ago

      Interesting, very interesting lol

      Reply

      William Lara

      8 years ago

      I have already cut down my 4 and 5 iron to the length of my 6 iron and found the consistency has improved. Not sure about longer short irons, I guess it will depend on the length that is decided on…

      Reply

      Leftienige

      8 years ago

      I seem to recall a company called Tiger Shark doing something similar 40-odd years ago . Their irons from SW to 6-iron had the usual length and lie differences , but 5,4,3, and 2 were all set up the same as the 6-iron .

      Reply

      Matty

      8 years ago

      What about a single-length split set of 4-6 F7 and 7-PW Forged One Length? Problem is that the swing weight is different for both sets.

      Given that most of the wedges in their lineup are one length, I’m betting on Mizuno to produce one or two single length sets.

      Reply

      Jason Crosby

      8 years ago

      Well I have already switched all my grips to jumbomax…I think this is the my next step.

      Reply

      Karl Doller

      8 years ago

      The folks at Gears show good reason for it.

      Reply

      Augustine Fan

      8 years ago

      I like the idea but too radical for my game. I think it has merits so I’m going with a slightly different approach but experimenting with 3 different lengths for my irons and wedges where 3-6 are 6 iron length & lie, 7-9 are 9 iron specs, and P/G/L wedges are LW specs.

      Reply

      Buddy Spretz

      8 years ago

      I am 76 years old,used to be a 5 to 8 handicapper until about age 69, then stopped playing till turned 75. Became a teaching pro at the age of 60 and taught for 8 yearsin Texas.
      Recently had back surgery and will get back on the course in about one month. I would love to get a set of the single length clubs. I live in Buckeye Arizona which is 20 miles west of
      Phoenix.
      Please let me know where to go.
      Thank you;
      Buddy Spretz
      713-907-2627
      [email protected]

      Reply

      Harvey Trimble

      8 years ago

      I’ve been using 1 Iron Pro Line Clubs for about 8 months. David Lake has been making single length sets at 1 Iron Golf for 17 years. His custom made clubs have helped me reduce my index from 18.9 to 12.1, and I’m 69 years old. What other game is there that a player nearing 70 has a real chance to get better.

      The concept has worked well for me. It is a change and you need to commit to the idea and follow through.

      I warm up with my 3 Iron since it has the least forgiveness, and once I’m comfortable with it, the rest of my 11 iron set are really easy to hit.

      If Cobra has success, and I hope they do, they will need to consider offering a number of different length shafts to accommodate golfers of various heights.

      Reply

      MG

      8 years ago

      Isn’t it strange that both the variable length and the single length irons have the exact same lofts? I figured cobra would tweak the lofts differently in the single length set to help with gapping. Especially toward the lower loftsd irons I thought they would have a 5 degree gap, not 3 degrees. My traditional set of Wilson’s have a 4 degree gap plus the change in length so how is cobra going to get proper gapped by with only 3 degrees?

      Also, it says the One Forged has a tungsten sole weight and the variable set has heel and toe tungsten weights. I thought the heads were exactly the same? And if they are not the same, is there an advantage one way or the other?

      Overall the One Forged definitely interests me and I look forward to demoing it!

      Reply

      Brian Manger

      8 years ago

      Interesting. I do believe you would need several weeks, maybe months, of tinkering to get lofts, lie angles and maybe minor adjustments to shaft length to get proper gapping in distance. Could get pricey, but I do believe it could be helpful. Especially, to amateurs.

      Reply

      Jim Klassen

      8 years ago

      We suggest 4 or 5 rounds. No distance change in my experience.

      Reply

      Brian Manger

      8 years ago

      Is that with all levels? I’m very interested. Is there a change in distance, all be it probably minimal, with better players who flush their long irons? Then again, if your doing well with long irons why switch? So, many questions. I like the idea of not changing your swing, stance, ball position etc. for every iron.

      Reply

      Steve S

      8 years ago

      Interesting that Golf Magazine showed up in the mail today and has a two page article on single length clubs. 4 and 5 iron lower trajectory than standard length…..

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      8 years ago

      Don’t subscribe to Golf Magazine, so I don’t know whether you’re talking broad generalizations or about a specific set/model, but with respect to Cobra F7 One:

      In order to make up for distance losses due to length, and to keep swing weight consistent, Cobra had to add 25 grams to the 4 iron head and 16 grams to the 5 iron head (compared to standard F7 model). As you might imagine, given how designers do things, that weight was placed lower in the club head. That results in comparatively lower CGNA with higher MOI in the F7 ONE long irons, which manifests itself as higher launch and more carry distance.

      I have 5 test cases (Cobra’s internal testing) in front of me. In 4 of those the F7 ONE 4 irons were slightly longer. In all 5, the ONE was either slightly longer, or approximately the same (and that’s before we start talking about narrower deviations with the ONE Length). As mentioned in the article, what most will see is higher and slightly longer long irons with more penetrating flight from short irons.

      And again in both cases, but particularly because of the challenges in designing ONE, Cobra put an extensive amount of time into getting the gapping right.

      Also worth a mention, while the message for the masses is ONE Length, ONE Swing, that doesn’t mean you can’t (or shouldn’t) vary ball positions between irons (just as you would with variable length irons) in order to achieve your desired trajectory.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      8 years ago

      Best I can tell, they took two sets of a single model of GI irons not designed as single length, added weight, likely via tip weights or lead tape (certainly not strategically placed internally), and found they launch lower. That’s not too surprising. It’s far from an ideal setup, but that’s excusable given their efforts to be ahead of the curve while attempting to test with like things. Iron testing is difficult to do on a true apples to apples basis, adding single length to mix complicates it further.

      At least they reference that club manufacturers will need to address the launch concerns… That was definitely listed among Cobra’s design challenges.

      As is usually the case with these type of tests, we don’t know to what degree they randomized, how (if at all) they handled outliers, nor is there any mention of consistency (standard deviations) between sets. They do mention dispersion patterns. Those too have their pros and cons. On the upside they can give you an idea of what’s producing the tightest grouping. On the downside, they can literally double in size because of the inclusion of a single shot (outliers…and near outliers are a bitch for dispersion plots).

      I just had this conversation earlier. Consider two clubs with an average carry distance of 150 yards. There are lots of ways to get there…one club might have a range of 147 to 153, while the other has a range of 140 to 160. At the end of the day the averages are the same, but I know which club I’d put in my bag. Frankly, I think consistency…or at least consistent distance is probably the single most important measure of iron performance.

      We’re working on plans for a test. Frankly, I’m not sure what we’ll find with the shorter irons, but distance and consistency with long irons isn’t something I anticipate will be a problem.

      My guess is there’s an adjustment period (mostly mental), but think about ONE Length for guys who don’t know anything different? I’m giving serious thought to making the commitment for next season (it’s already frost delay season here in upstate NY).

      Stuart Hasson

      8 years ago

      I have a set of wishon golf irons , 5 – sw all same length , swing weight and balance point. Same swing with all shots … very effective if swinging well

      Reply

      Nigel Day

      8 years ago

      9 iron with a 7 iron shaft !! Take some getting use to .⛳️

      Reply

      Tom

      8 years ago

      Coincidentally, I purchased single length irons at the start of the current golf year (Nova). They took getting used to. For a long time I was pushing shots off to the right and, to a lesser extent, missing straight left also. Trying to get used to them and correcting my allignment issues may also have resulted in a two week period where I had the shanks really badly. Now however, I feel quite comfortable with my swing and am hitting more greens.

      In my experience, all clubs, 3 thru PW, went the same distance as my old cobra irons. I had no gap issues. For me, a consistant 10 yards between clubs.

      I never could get used to the long PW so use standard length wedges.

      Kind of sorry I did not wait for the release of these irons but at the same time, happy with my purchase.

      Incidentally, having single length irons looks great in the bag; just do not accidently grab the 6 instead of the 9 like I have a time or two.

      Reply

      Tyler

      8 years ago

      I just bought Tom Wishon Sterling set ” Fantastic !! I even bought his Hybrib 4 and 7 & 4 wood and driver ! All titanium ! Great gapping in distance and long ! Very straight too ! I love em ! I use to own the One Iron set but these are 10 x better ! I found a pro fitter . I think Cobra will do good if they get just get it rolling ! It is just damn easier to play better golf !

      Reply

      Lewis Daff

      8 years ago

      Unless you want forged left handed. Is it too much to ask? Really?

      Reply

      Rob Vining

      8 years ago

      Yes. It really in unfortunate that a new innovation such as this is not available for us left handers. This is one of the reason that I play Ping. Every club they release is available in both left and right hand.

      Rob

      Reply

      Robert

      8 years ago

      37.25 length seems really long to me. That’s a 6 iron length in a lot of sets I’ve played. 36.75-37 is more like a 7 iron.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      8 years ago

      That’s basically where we are across much of the industry. Look at Cobra’s KING LTD CB/MB set (designed for better players). The 5 iron is 38.25″ long. The 7…37.25″.

      Reply

      Gua

      8 years ago

      I held a couple current lines (f6/forged tec) of cobra irons up to other competitors irons and the cobra’s were always shorter. Even if the measurements were the same or if competitors irons were stated shorter they were still longer in length? All stock sets I compared them to so I don’t understand how the hell cobra measures their irons. Anywhere from a 1/4″ to 3/4″ shorter. That also applies even if the cobra’s were stated on paper to be longer. Doesn’t make any sense to me. Good write up by the way.

      Tony Covey

      8 years ago

      There is no standard for measurement. I’m not positive how Cobra measures their irons, but I can tell you that some (many) manufacturers measure with the (stock) grip installed, and others measure to the cut length of the shaft. A couple seasons back Nike’s irons got longer on the spec sheet, for example, but really all that changed was how they measure. Depending on the grip, a 1/4″ difference wouldn’t be out of the realm of possibility. I’ve never EVER seen 3/4″ short from anyone.

      Guanto

      8 years ago

      Thanks. I think it was a forged tec 5i to a apex (16 i think) 5i and it was a 1/2 at least but probably closer to 3/4″ different. Anyways no big deal.

      MickelDaff

      8 years ago

      Had me intrigued until I read ‘right hand only’ on the Forged ONE.

      Why are we getting middle finger again, just because we play on the opposite side of the ball?

      A concept that had me extremely excited has now left me deflated. I know we’re a small market percentage but come on, let us have something for once….

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      8 years ago

      Strictly a numbers decision I’m sure. If you’re not sure you can sell enough clubs to offset additional costs (tooling), it doesn’t make financial sense to produce the irons.

      There isn’t any sort of secret war of lefties. It’s the same reason why a majority of companies don’t produce blades for lefties.

      Reply

      Sean

      8 years ago

      What are the lofts?
      Surely they can’t be standard and achieve the proper gapping.

      Reply

      Steve S

      8 years ago

      Lofts are in the charts Tony provided……

      Reply

      Steve S

      8 years ago

      I have played 3/4 of a season (last year) with single length irons. (Pinhawks by Value Golf) As a “new” senior(God, I hate that word; I was only happy to be called one in high school and college) I thought I’d give SL irons a shot. Here’s what I found:

      1. Distance gaps were OK. I hit my pitching wedge a little further than my old set but not by more than 5 yards. 5 iron was a little shorter but again not more than 5 yards.

      2. My swing speed is slow(95 mph driver speed max; 93 average) which may have contributed to the shorter 5 iron.

      3. I have a pretty consistent swing. I use a single plane swing along the lines of Moe Norman (started using it 12 years ago with Natural Golf which is now the Graves boys).

      4. Since I have a fairly consistent swing and few moving parts I didn’t see a lot of difference between single length and my old irons (Burner Plus 2007)

      I think that the single length approach will actually help faster, younger swingers. I think it is also a great way for someone NEW to golf to start. should promote any easier way to learn the game. Not sure it’ll help a senior golfer: I have arthritis in my lower spine and bending over to putt is much more of a problem than swinging a wedge. For guys with a bad back the Moe Norman approach will help more than the SL clubs, IMO.

      I’d love to try the new Cobras but I’m not going to spend what they’ll be asking. I’m sure in the next year or so they’ll be plenty of sets on ebay cheap as golfers who have crappy swings try them and discard them.

      Reply

      Jd Stocker

      8 years ago

      Idk about one length, but it’s very intriguing. But I also believe long irons and woods are far to long for the average golfer to be consistent with. I’ve shortened all my clubs, and have lost nearly no distance. But I’m in the fairway more, and mis hits are far less frequent

      Reply

      Iain Douglas

      8 years ago

      Very interesting idea. My 7 iron is normally the one I hit the best so a 7 iron swing on all clubs could work for me.

      Reply

      Timothy Williams

      8 years ago

      I will be happy to buy a set of Sterling after test driving my own component built set: they have been awesome for the 2 rounds I have tried. It’s a huge (wonderful) change to have the shorter-heavier feel on every club through 4 iron. I am a believer!
      Mine have cheaper shafts, grips and who knows how accurate lofting is? So I will definitely be a customer if I stick with single-length (80% chance!)

      Reply

      Edward Colligon

      8 years ago

      I really want the one length colorway on variable irons… that being said I feel that I must at least try the single length if I decide to get new irons next year. If you don’t test everything available, you can’t guarantee you’re making the right choice.

      Reply

      Richard

      8 years ago

      1) One of the other potential benefits of The Single Length Clubs is that they are defacto “MOI matched” (Usually Measured in kg per cm squared). if the club head weights are the same. If your clubs or groups of them require the same physical effort to swing it becomes easier to be more consistent. i.e. your swing requires less day to day maintenance aka more self maintaining. (This may be bad for the instructor led quest for the perfect swing treadmill :))
      2) The choice of which club and what length to standardize on can be experimented with.
      3) Players in lower end of the swing speed spectrum may require Hybrids or Irons with Maraging Steel Face Inserts to compensate for the distance loss arising out of the length standardization.

      Reply

      Rod_CCCGOLFUSA

      8 years ago

      We are fitting Wishon’s Sterling single length irons. Our test heads are the 9, 7, & 5 mounted on 115g steel R-flex shafts, all tipped and butt trimmed the same. The heads varied a couple of grams in weight, so swing weights were adjusted to match perfectly. Just a couple of fittings completed so far, but they reflect what you found with Cobra. Lie angle and shaft flex definitely must be fitted to the player for best results. A slight amount of loft gapping is needed 7-6-5 irons. Mid-handicap players had inconsistent results with the 5-iron, inexplicably because it was set up exactly the same as the remainder of the set. Overall result was significant improvement in solid strikes, shot dispersion, and consistency. Have not tried to match these irons with a hybrid #5, but that might overcome the mental block of swinging a short 5-iron.

      Reply

      Alfredo Smith

      8 years ago

      ‘F’ no

      Reply

      Frank

      8 years ago

      I had all of my irons made the same length as my 7 iron 35 years ago. The best thing I ever done and i’am still using them. There a little worn out but at 73 there fine.

      Reply

      Conn

      8 years ago

      Great comprehensive article. I’m in the sceptical party and suspect they will be a lot of these for sale on ebay in 24 months. That said, if Bryson wins a big one, that would be a game changer.

      Reply

      Kenny B

      8 years ago

      Is that a D8 on that wedge? And is that the swing weight?

      Since I play a single-plane swing, I have been intrigued with this concept. There is no mention of shafts, and I assume that since the heads are variable weight, there would be a significant difference in swing weight whether steel or graphite is used. Was graphite shafts mentioned?

      Reply

      Kenny B

      8 years ago

      Sorry – meant the heads were same weight.
      Quite a lot of difference between a 110g steel and 70g graphite. How do they compensate?

      Reply

      Jerry

      8 years ago

      I’ll admit I’m both curious and confused. Thinking about this concept I wonder exactly where the benefit lies. Over the past 10 years my swing speed has declined (age) but ironically my accuracy has improved immensely. My typical error now is under clubbing and not missing the center of the face. So would a single length club benefit “my game”? Another concept that I wonder on (w/o rereading your article) is ballflight? i.e. With a longer club does the launch angle change? Shorter clubs allow a steeper angle of attack that increases trajectory so would these clubs force a complete re-learn of your swing?

      Reply

      Tetstunosuke Nishina

      8 years ago

      I want to try that.

      Reply

      Rob Samson

      8 years ago

      I built a set of Pinhawks before the trend went mainstream. It was a cool experiment and I’m glad I have a set sitting in the garage. I thought having one swing would be cool to try, and it was. But it wasn’t for me. I hit them on the range once in a while but wouldn’t dare pull them out for a money game.

      Reply

      Sebastian

      8 years ago

      I love the idea of this. I tried the sterling Irons by Wishon and almost got them. Wanted to wait to see other options. It is true, it makes hitting easier.

      I will be trying these as soon as they come out.

      Reply

      Jaacob Bowden

      8 years ago

      I’m actually curious to have a look at them as well…but honestly I doubt they’d be able to outperform Sterling Irons because of the level to which we can custom fit them. Not to mention Sterling Irons are based off an 8-iron length, which over the course of the season will outperform sets at 7-iron length or longer due to the fact that shorter length clubs are generally easier to hit consistently over time. Plus, you won’t have to deal with longer length wedges, which is one problem area Tom and I noticed in our research.

      Reply

      ryebread

      8 years ago

      Tony: Great read. Honestly, this is the set I’m most interested in this coming year. I’m playing an “iron” set that is 4+ seasons old, having not seen anything better or different. This might be it.

      Any word on whether Cobra might go with something like the OS head in a single length setup? I think single length could be a godsend to beginners and high handicappers and the size of the OS head could also provide that visual confidence.

      And before anyone talks about shovels and why should people care, I care for three reasons:
      1) I know single cappers playing SGI iron setups. There is a quiet market there.
      2) Anything that speeds up the game for beginners and high handicappers makes it better for us all. (I say this as a mid/high-capper depending on course, day and swing)
      3) Anything that makes golf more accessible and easy to pick up will help the game. It’s in trouble and part of it is in the difficulty level of learning. For certain types like me, it’s admittedly part of what makes it fun, but that’s not a way to grow a game.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      8 years ago

      Nothing in the near-term pipeline for ONE Length SGI. That said, it’s a segment for which I think single length makes a ridiculous amount of sense. Whether it’s for high-handicappers, or for new golfers (we need those), it’s hard to argue against simplifying the swing.

      My guess…even Cobra is taking a bit of a wait and see approach. If ONE meets or exceeds projections, I think we’ll see SGI by the end of 2017. If it falls flat, we could be looking at a 2+ year cycle. If Bryson wins the Masters…look out.

      Reply

      Ryebread

      8 years ago

      Thanks for the reply Tony. That makes sense (business sense). I tend to agree that the market where it makes the most sense for actual benefit of the golfer is in the SGI space.

      Cleveland/Srixon: If you are out there listening, your HiBore progressively sized hybrid irons would be fantastic on a single length setup. That’s exactly the look that would make people more confident in that shorter shafted 5.

      Albert Hahn

      8 years ago

      Thanks for the write up! I’m intrigued by the idea of having all mid~long irons be the same length (w length being variable for short irons and wedges). Sort of like hybrids replacing long irons?

      Reply

      Collin Airheart

      8 years ago

      Depends on the golfer. Works pretty well for Bryson DeChambeau.

      Reply

      Corby Ross

      8 years ago

      He also didn’t earn his card this season ?

      Reply

      Ed

      8 years ago

      Actually he did, but not in the manner you are probably thinking:

      http://www.golfdigest.com/story/bryson-dechambeau-wins-webcom-finals-opener-wraps-up-pga-tour-card

      http://www.golfchannel.com/news/golf-central-blog/dechambeau-clinches-tour-card-finals-win/

      Since he finished 1st in the first of the web.com finals, he earned one of the 25 available cards for 16-17.

      Still hard to deny his non-major performance is underwhelming, but I feel like he’ll have a solid year next year. In any event, he’s still very young, and although there have been some successful 21-25 year olds, he still basically has 20 good years of golf (or more) ahead of him

      Iain Douglas

      8 years ago

      Corby Ross I thought he got his card. Might if been through Q school or something but sure he has now.

      Reply

      Corby Ross

      8 years ago

      MyGolf Spy nice! I didn’t know he won the Finals! I like the way he thinks and how much he could help advance the game

      Reply

      Mark Reckling

      8 years ago

      No this is silly

      Reply

      Marios Sergides

      8 years ago

      Why is it silly? One of the best and most consistent ball strikers ever had single length irons.. Moe Norman

      Reply

      Brian

      8 years ago

      Moe Norman never played a single professional golf tournament with single length irons, not one.

      Mark Reckling

      8 years ago

      It will work for some. But the masses won’t flock to it. And Now is a legend, but he is no Jack or Arnold.

      Reply

      John

      8 years ago

      Great review. I am very intrigued with the same length irons. I will be swinging these in January.

      Do you know if they will be offering Women’s iron sets?

      Reply

      MmmmmBuddy

      8 years ago

      See #9 Above…

      9. Who are ONE Length irons for?
      Potentially everybody. More realistically, my early impression is that ONE Length is a serious option for anyone who needs help with iron consistency.

      ONE Length should certainly be considered for beginning golfers as well. Single length irons reduce the complexity of the iron game and with it, the overall learning curve.

      Honestly, I was disappointed to learn that ONE Length irons won’t yet be available for women (yet). With my wife threatening to pick up the game, I believe ONE Length would make the learning process more enjoyable.

      And yeah…there is a legitimate case to be made for seniors and anyone else who might be suffering from a physical problem that makes swinging shorter irons uncomfortable.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      8 years ago

      I had a brief text exchange with Cobra’s Jose Miraflor last week about women’s clubs. As I mentioned in the article, a tremendous amount of research went into figuring out the gapping of the men’s clubs. There’s more work to be done in that area before a women’s line becomes a reality.

      I would also guess that women’s ONE Length, or the lack thereof, is a cost/benefit decision. The women’s market is small, so when dealing with a new (or reinvigorated) concept it’s almost certainly an uphill climb to break even.

      McaseyM

      8 years ago

      I guessed right ( for once) I thought that they would be the first OEM to go for it once they signed DeChambeau. I’d love to see these in their black King finish. I can’t wait to give these a go.

      Reply

      hckymeyer

      8 years ago

      Very intriguing and a great write up as usual. I can’t wait for these to go through Most Wanted testing, or maybe a little teaser with an MGS Labs test.

      One other question with One length irons. Do you buy all the same iron shaft? I play C-Tapers, if I was going to reshaft them would I buy all 7 iron shafts?

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      8 years ago

      Great question. For the most part, Cobra is recommending using the same shaft you would use in a variable length set. So, 7 iron shaft in your 7, 5 iron shaft in your 5.

      And yeah…we’re kicking around some ideas for testing as well.

      Reply

      hckymeyer

      8 years ago

      Aren’t all the head weights the same though? I can’t wrap my head around using standard shafts (5 in 5, 6 in 6 etc) when all the head weights would be the same. I would think it would end up soft stepping and hard stepping a bunch of them around the median club.

      Any yes this is the mind of a club ho/tinkerer. Irons are still months away and I’m already trying to reshaft them :)

      MmmmmBuddy

      8 years ago

      Thats interesting. Will that not lead to some feel, weight and shaft flex issues? and what about lengths in the short irons?? If I am using a Pw shaft that is supposed to be a 7 iron length, there has to be some technical issues at play there. Admittedly, I know just enough about this stuff to know that I don’t know enough to answer this question.

      PeteT

      8 years ago

      As a 20 year club maker I decided to experiment with SL clubs a couple years ago. I currently play the Pinhawk SL irons, 5-PW (Valuegolf). Not shilling, just saying. This set is graduated in 5 degree increments. 50 degree PW through 25 degree 5 iron. This is to help create more usable gaps between the clubs since loft is the primary determinant of distance. I play Adams Super S hybrids 23/19 degree, same length, same swing weight (19 degree cut down to same length as 23 degree, weighted to bring up swingweight). Stock carry distances: PW-105yards, 9-120, 8-130, 7-143, 6-155, 5-168; my hybrids are 180 and 195. I also use two Score wedges at 54 and 57 (bent to 58) to fill out the bottom of the set. These are same length as 5-PW, but are slightly heavier heads, so higher swingweight. I tried leaving them stock, but like them being the same length, even though they feel a bit different. The extra length in the wedges took almost no time getting used to. It was not a big deal at all. I used Kurokage 80 gram graphite iron shafts all tipped and cut to 6 iron length. I typically play 1 inch over standard in variable length clubs being 6’3″. .

      The 5-PW are the same weight and same swingweight, and very close on frequency matching. My 5 iron is just slightly off frequency from the others (shaft issue I am sure) and I can tell the difference, so I don’t really get why they would recommend stepping the shafts like you would in a variable length/variable head weight set. That makes zero sense to me. The whole goal is to have them all act and feel the same, and they wouldn’t if you followed that recommendation.

      Tony is right about the 5 iron; it is harder for some reason not to try and lay into your 5 iron more than the 7. Yet when I put the same smooth swing on it that I do with my 7, I get the right distance. I really like the SL concept and after a very brief adjustment period, it really did help with consistency. I have played some of my best golf since switching to SL irons, shaving two strokes off a 10 to an 8 handicap. Swing repeatability has been much easier to attain.

      One thing I noticed is my 5 iron has a lower trajectory than my previous set. This is a result of being shorter by almost 1.5 inches and is a known issue with SL sets. I believe Wishon and Cobra dealt with the issue of too low launch angles in the lower lofted clubs by using hollow body construction and repositioning the CG to help overcome this issue.

      Andé

      8 years ago

      Any idea as to how much the KING F7 ONE can be bent?

      Tony Covey

      8 years ago

      +/- 4°

      Pierre

      8 years ago

      Are you sure, for a +/- 4°… since these one are cast, normaly +/- 2°. If it’s true for a +/- 4°, maybe a good option for lefty since the forged one is not available for LH.

      Tony Covey

      8 years ago

      Yes. Confirmed with Cobra. The ability to bend has little to do with cast vs. forged. It’s about the material used.

      Anthony

      8 years ago

      How much can the Forged one length be bent?

      Bobtrumpet

      8 years ago

      Interesting. Contrary to Tom Wishon’s shaft recommendations for single length irons.

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