First Look: Ben Hogan Edge Irons
Irons

First Look: Ben Hogan Edge Irons

First Look: Ben Hogan Edge Irons
“I can honestly say that I have never had a bad day on the golf course. Learning to play this game is all about improvement. My goal was to become a better player every day. If I learned something that made me a better player, it was a good day.” –Ben Hogan, quoted by David Hueber from In The Rough: The Business Game of Golf

Throughout all its iterations dating back to 1953, the Ben Hogan Company has had its good days and its bad days. There have been major championships and changes in ownership, along with comebacks, setbacks, mothballing, bankrolling, shutdowns and other showdowns.

Love it or hate it, it’s the brand that simply refuses to die.

And not only is Hogan refusing to die, but it’s also actually insisting on being relevant again by following up last week’s Equalizer wedge release with an entirely new from-the-ground-up iron set bearing a classic Hogan name – Edge.

Ben Hogan Edge 2

Feel + Forgiveness

“It made a lot of sense, given the history and the heritage of the Edge name, to bring it back,” says Hogan CEO Scott White. The very first Hogan Edge iron was introduced in the late 80’s and became one of the most successful game-improvement irons in history. It was the first Hogan iron to feature perimeter weighting for extra forgiveness, along with the classic Hogan forged feel.

Will the new Edge live up to the standard set by its namesake? Not surprisingly, White says absolutely.

“I don’t like the term game-improvement. I’d rather call it game-enhancement,” White tells MyGolfSpy. “It’s for guys or women who are serious about their games, who play a bit and have some skill. It’s not a club with training wheels by any stretch of the imagination, but it does have some game improvement properties to it.”

There’s plenty of perimeter weighting in the new Edge, but it’s well hidden internally. There’s still a cavity, and you can physically see the outline of the perimeter weighting, but the vast majority of the weighting is inside the head. The Edge is a two-piece forging: once the perimeter weighting is put in the proper place for each iron, the forged face is laser-welded onto the forged frame.

White says it bears the look of a traditional forging, but with a thicker topline and more offset than either the PTx or Ft. Worth 15 irons, which are both aimed at the better player. Overall, the head itself is about 12% larger than the PTx.

6iron_exploded4

White says the Edge is for anyone ranging from a high single digit to around an 18 handicap.

“Hogan Tour staffers J.J. Henry and Mark Brooks both say the long irons may end up in their bags at some point,” says White. “It’s very forgiving, and it’s forged, so it feels great. It’s not a clunky, investment cast club that won’t give you any feedback on where you’re impacting the face. These will give you some feedback and help you improve.”

Last week we heard from a couple of readers quite vocal in their wishes for Hogan to bring back another iconic image – the Hogan sunburst logo. You’ll be happy to know Hogan was thinking the same thing.

EdgeCombo2v1_1286x

 

As a former owner of the Hogan brand, Callaway still has rights to Hogan’s other iconic name – Apex. White says that even thought Callaway did come out with irons named Edge a few years ago (and still sells them in a boxed-set to Costco), Hogan’s lawyers have done their homework on the Edge name.

“Nobody owns the name ‘Edge’ outright. It’s too generic. Our trademark is for ‘Ben Hogan Edge,'”

Say Goodbye to Lofts

When Hogan returned in 2015, its theme was “Precision is Back.” Instead of using iron numbers, Hogan irons were instead stamped with lofts – what the company called the PreciseLoftTM System – and every loft from 20- to 47-degrees was available. So instead of reaching for your 7-iron from 165 yards out, you’d be reaching for your 33-iron (or your 34, or 35, depending on your set makeup).

It’s fair to say the concept was polarizing. Some golfers were fine with it, others not so much. From a manufacturing and assembly standpoint, it had to have been a logistical and inventory nightmare.

456EDGE-1

For the new Edge irons, it’s back to basics.

“We’ve gone back to traditional iron numbers only,” says White, who adds Hogan is still committed to the basic tenet of the PreciseLoftTM System: 4-degree gaps between clubs in the set.

“The loft compression at the short end of most sets is, quite honestly, just ridiculous,” declares White. “It really eliminates your ability to score well. We find in a lot of competitive sets you’re hitting your 7-, 8- and 9-irons within 7 to 10 yards of each other. That’s just not the way we think irons should be developed and built.”

Edge sets start with a 22-degree 4-iron and go up to a 46-degree pitching wedge – lofts which, by today’s standards, are downright traditional.

Ben Hogan Edge - specs

“It’s not a competition to see who has the longest 7-iron,” says White. “That’s not our goal.”

“We’re not trying to manufacture our irons to win at Demo Day. We’re trying to provide the best tools for a golfer to score with. Hogan players tend to be more accomplished, more skilled. For them it’s not about distance. It’s about having the tools to get around the golf course strategically and in as few strokes as possible. A 7-iron you can hit 180 yards isn’t necessarily the best way to do that.” – Scott White, Ben Hogan CEO

Each iron can be loft-adjusted 3-degrees up and 2-degrees down, as well as lie adjusted, which Hogan will provide as standard customization at no extra charge. You’ll also have your choice of standard or midsize grips and of available shafts: KBS Tour V in Stiff or X-Still, KBS Tour 90 in Regular or Stiff, or UST Recoil 660 in A-Flex or Regular, or the 680 in Stiff.

edge_top

The Edge irons will sell only on Hogan’s website for $105.00 per club or $735.00 for a seven club set. The price is the same for steel or graphite shafts and includes all loft, lie, and shaft-specific swingweight customizations.

Edge irons should be part of Hogan’s 14-day Demo Program in early April. White says he’s hoping to have 6- and 9-iron demo sets available right around the Masters.

More Changes In Ft. Worth

As we mentioned last week, with the advent of the new Equalizer wedges, the Hogan TK 15 wedges will be phased out by the end of this year (you can buy them on Hogan’s website currently for $75/each). Some other changes are coming to the rest of the lineup, as well.

“PTx will stay in the lineup, but we’re going to eliminate two of the PreciseLoftTM configurations,” says White. Currently, Hogan offers the PTx in four separate loft configurations – it calls them Low, Mid, Mid-High or High launch. Low Launch, for example, is a 7-club set starting at 20-degrees and ending at 44-degrees. High Launch starts at 23-degrees and ends at 47-degrees.

“80% of our orders are for the Mid-High Launch, the one that starts at 22-degrees. So we’re going to offer that one, and the low launch as well – we get a lot of orders from people playing in the Texas wind – so we’re going to phase out the odd number lofts.” – Scott White

White says there may be some changes coming to the Ft. Worth 15 irons (“Film at 11,” he says), but any changes or enhancements won’t be coming for a few months. No changes are planned for the Hogan VKTR hybrids or Ft. Worth 15 Hi utility irons and don’t expect any metal woods from Hogan this year.

“We continue to work on them,” says White. “But we’re still not where we need to be.”

Still Standing

“If you dig it out of the dirt, it is yours forever.” – Hogan, quoted by Hueber

Mr. Hogan may have been talking about the golf swing, but it’s an apt analogy for this version of his company.

“A year ago, we really weren’t sure what was going to happen,” says White. “But by doing things simply, methodically, strategically and doing a few things well instead of a bunch of things poorly, it’s an easy formula.”

edge_solo_2

White admits that at this time last year, he really didn’t think Hogan would still be around. But once new ownership was in place and the Direct-to-Consumer model was launched, he knew Hogan was back in the game.

“These aren’t guys who just dabble in anything,” he says. “When they see an opportunity to upset the status quo and make an impact in an established industry like golf equipment, I knew then this was going to be a lot of fun. We’re staying focused on the serious, more accomplished golfer. As long as you have a direction and everybody understands it, it’s pretty easy to execute on it.”

For You

For You

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John Barba

John Barba

John Barba

John is an aging, yet avid golfer, writer, 6-point-something handicapper living back home in New England after a 22-year exile in Minnesota. He loves telling stories, writing about golf and golf travel, and enjoys classic golf equipment. “The only thing a golfer needs is more daylight.” - BenHogan

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John Barba

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      Kevin

      2 years ago

      I have had these for 2 seasons now and still love them. Recoil 70g shafts in irons and 48, 52, and 56 degree wedges. The 56 is an Equalizer 2. Got a 4 wood and a putter to mess around with and like them both. I would recommend them to the average golfer who would be able to improve, my current status (lol). I had a set of the old forged Edge GS back in ‘93 and replaced them with the newer ones, even after testing other brands and the price was right. I have noticed that the prices are creeping up and might make me less inclined to go that route. Overall, good clubs, for me anyway.

      Reply

      2Eagle

      3 years ago

      Give us some information on how these irons hit! You gave us NO INFORMATION THAT WAS NOT ON THE WEBSITE!!!!

      Reply

      Jeff Weeks

      6 years ago

      I just ordered a set of these with graphite shafts last week, can’t wait. I bought the GCD Edge’s back in 95, love the feel, look and they got me to a 10 handicap. I bought some used Taylormade RBZ a few years ago and I never was comfortable with them so this year I went back to my old Hogans and I’m already playing better. I looking forward to continuing the same with these, and lower my scores.

      Reply

      Jeffery Howard

      6 years ago

      I have played Hogans for 40 years and am interested to say the least. I would love to know how the Demo program works.

      Reply

      Duffy McHackster

      6 years ago

      the new edge and equalizers are very interesting, but my only concern would be the cost of shipping to Canada being high enough to offset the good price point from Hogan. Anyone have experience or knowledge in this area?

      Reply

      Lynyrd

      6 years ago

      I could have sworn when Callaway Golf sold the Ben Hogan name, they kept the Apex and Edge trademarks. Obviously I’m wrong about Edge. Regardless, always good to see smaller brands still in the game even if I don’t use them.

      Reply

      Johnny Penso

      6 years ago

      They look sharp and the price is right. I’d love to give them a few swings. My only fear is excessive offset, something I’ve never been a fan of.

      Reply

      Steven

      6 years ago

      My father’s last set that he had were edges and I played apex pluses. I found my set as a return to a independent golf store. I fell in love with them from the first swing, so much so that when we bought a condo in Fla I found a set to leave there. I later found another brand of irons the same way, subsequently have put them as backup. I would love to try them locally off the rack or through a fitter as to blindly ordering a set.

      Reply

      MGoBlue100

      6 years ago

      I’m not in the market for irons this season, but if I was, comments like “We’re not trying to win Demo Day”, and “a 7-iron that you can hit 180 isn’t necessarily strategic” would move the Edge close to the top of my list. Maybe some truth in advertising for once?

      Reply

      Golfinnut

      6 years ago

      Love to see these making a comeback! Plus I’m glad they went away with the loft numbering system … that was an idiotic idea in the first place. A bit of a different look than my old Hogan Apex blades of yesteryear! HA!

      Reply

      Dance_Business

      6 years ago

      I loved my SCOR wedges. I am thinking of replacing my irons. I wonder if I could get C-TAPER LITE R shafts and just the 6 through wedge… With the Decade looking grips? That would be great!

      Reply

      mackdaddy

      6 years ago

      Those look sweet.

      Reply

      keith herbert

      6 years ago

      Looking forward to trying these sweeties out.

      Reply

      Terry R.

      6 years ago

      I like the look of the new Hogan Edge. Sure would like to hit them to see how they feel. I currently play with 1989 Hogan Edge 1 – SW irons. These are the best forged irons I’ve hit. In my past I’ve played with Wilson Staff, Walter Hagen, Hogan Apex forged irons. The Hogan Edge are the softest, buttery feeling forged head and easy to work the ball left or right on command.

      Reply

      Berniez40

      6 years ago

      Love to see these as I was sad to see Hogan go away. I am looking for a new set for retirement in a couple of years. These sure seem to fit the bill. I currently play Srixon Z355’s but would welcome the forged feel in a Game Improvement club that plays to a 15 capper looking to get to single digits in retirement.I don’t mean this as an insult, because I actually loved them, but they do bear a slight resemblance to the old McGregor V-Foils. I play the recoil shafts in my hybrids, and would love to have them in my irons as well. At under $800 for these in graphite sounds like a steal.

      Reply

      Mike Horn

      6 years ago

      C300 Forged irons at $85 per club (my Club’s demo day price), just replaced my $500 per club PXG 0311 XF which I have played for about 18-months. Foam filled PXG feels like I am hitting a stale potato, has no feedback and frankly, are pretentious and ugly. The C300 Forged are the best feeling GI club I tried, look great and perform. I considered and hit Rogue Pro, Rogue, Apex, AP1, G700, G400, i200, regular C300, V6 and JPX900 Forged before purchasing C300 Forged to replace my PXG stale potato smashers.

      Reply

      Ike

      6 years ago

      Despite claims that these or ANY factory made clubs are “fitted” I cannot comprehend how anyone in good conscience can make this statement and make it believable. I have played Hogan clubs in the past and was properly fitted by a custom fitter who tested different MOI weightings and shafts to see that I had clubs that were matched to me and then this fitter assembled these clubs to these specifications. The clubs were great and only replaced by newer custom made technology. I defy anyone in the golf business to truly make a properly fitted club in a factory where the assembler has no knowledge of the player’s swing characteristics. Beware!

      Reply

      Mike T

      6 years ago

      I ordered up three wedges a week ago after getting email from Hogan and reading your post. I just might get a demo set of irons.
      I playecCallaway Apex forged irons and love them but….. I played Scorvwedges but they wore out. Cleveland CTX cavity now for the last 12 months Also nearly worn and not forged. Can’t wait for the Equalizers.

      Reply

      Drew

      6 years ago

      Very nice to see a company not obsessed with how long a particular iron hits the ball.

      Reply

      scott

      6 years ago

      I agree gap distance is more important then if can hit a 7 iron 150 or a 140 yards.

      Reply

      Drew Ryan

      6 years ago

      John, great job again- I want them!!! I am itching to get my hands on the Edge irons and the Equalizer wedges (I currently game the TK wedges, and they are wonderful, but new is new!!!) I am so happy for the Hogan Company- they have been straight up and honest, are all about the quality and don’t skimp -there is no compromise, and no shortcuts- this is honest, hard work ethic and standing behind quality material. Great stuff!

      Reply

      Rob

      6 years ago

      I know they have a separate line of wedges called the Equalizer but I’m surprised they didn’t stamp the pitching wedge with an “E” instead of “P”.

      Very good looking set of clubs for sure and I’m glad they are still apart of the landscape.

      Reply

      Golfraven

      6 years ago

      Fully agree. Keep. the E for PW. This really differentiated BH from other clubs

      Reply

      strokerAce

      6 years ago

      I really like the fact that when they decided to bring these back they added new tech but kept the traditional aesthetics. That stamped hosel, the double red striped ferrule, the classic sunburst and the subtle red number stamped on the end of the iron.
      Those look very nice and the fact there is no upcharge for graphite is a great deal.

      Reply

      Haywood

      6 years ago

      If Ben Hogan makes the same quality they used to, these could be popular sellers. I still play my 3 iron and PW from my Apex forged blades and love them. 15 years later and they still perform just as well as my other clubs.

      Reply

      Wm.

      6 years ago

      Why have that much offset with traditional loft? The guy who wants traditional lofts doesn’t want offset. The guy who is OK with offset tends to be the guy that wants a 31 degree 7 iron as well as the larger head to help him out.

      Reply

      scott

      6 years ago

      the idea of golf is to shoot a low score so if a 7 iron is 30 or 32 degree loft why would you care . I started playing golf with a real wood head driver but a I play a metal one now so much for traditional

      Reply

      Scott H

      6 years ago

      When I was a young Golfer forged hogan Iron’s were what I aspired to, particularly the Hogan Edge or Apex in the late 1980’s. I was away from the game for 20 years and found out Hogan went away and has come back. I am really happy to see this. I don’t claim forged clubs make you better, but they make me feel better about hitting the bal.

      Reply

      Guy

      6 years ago

      They’re so ugly.

      Reply

      M Carson

      3 years ago

      If they are ugly to you, then they are not for you. I am sure down to a -6 handicap, there would be golfers who these clubs could benefit. They have too much offset for me, but who am I (or you) to say they are ugly. Forged iron with BH feel and quality–sounds pretty handsome to me.

      Reply

      tom

      6 years ago

      One question John: Did Hogan provide you a sample club for you try to assist you in your write up?

      Reply

      Alex

      6 years ago

      I wish more companies did a loft configuration that went from a 20 degree 4 iron to a 50 degree gap wedge. Same amount of clubs but just increase the gapping…

      Reply

      Tim

      6 years ago

      I have a few buddies who have been playing Hogan irons for YEARS and love them. I’m a newer golfer (comparatively) and have been hoping for a game improvement option from them. Can’t wait to try via the demo program.

      Reply

      chemclub

      6 years ago

      Nice write up john. Love the Hogan sunburst – so iconic.

      I also like the logical approach to lofts!

      Reply

      Craig

      6 years ago

      Great to see the Hogan “Edge” name coming back. Reminds me of a time when I was playing to a scratch hcp…until I took a lesson from the Head Pro at the course I worked at.
      At $700+ dollars for a set of 7 clubs, this could be a no brainer.

      Reply

      Keith

      6 years ago

      Love these. Would love to see a comparison to ping i200, AP2s etc

      Reply

      ole gray

      6 years ago

      Well done John! The pics in this article have changed my mind on the looks department. They look pretty darn sweet to say the least.

      Reply

      John Loffler

      6 years ago

      All very interesting and good to see the Ben Hogan range adapting BUT, and its a big BUT, are these going to available for lefties, or like the rest of their range, despite many promises to include lefties, will they be right-hand only?

      Reply

      Alan

      6 years ago

      Hogan irons always look great. Pity about the lack of availability to try in person, shaft options and the fact I’m left handed :(. I do wish them well

      Reply

      Ben Hogan Golf

      6 years ago

      Left handed are coming in June and we have a demo program where we ship directly to you to test in person at your own course.

      Reply

      Johnny Penso

      6 years ago

      I thought left handed was a long shot but I’d feel like a lottery winner if you were able to do this in The Great White North as well!!

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