Ask MyGolfSpy: Wilson Golf
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Ask MyGolfSpy: Wilson Golf

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Ask MyGolfSpy: Wilson Golf

This Ask MyGolfSpy is a little different, in that we’re asking for your questions on a specific OEM, Wilson Golf.

Or, if you prefer, Wilson Staff.

We solicited questions from you on our social media feeds and, as always, you came up with some doozies. We couldn’t answer all of them (but we’ll throw out some on social, just for fun), but as you might expect, you had a lot of fundamental questions about Wilson’s past, present and future.

Wilson Staff Model irons.

So here goes…

Q: I think about Wilson’s company strategy vs the major OEMs we think about. At some point, they lost all their ground. Was it just marketing or investments in technology or just their clubs didn’t look good or that their woods lineup was poor? Why did they fade? – @BigHippoZen

This is what you folks are most curious about. In one form or another, it was the most-asked question. There’s no simple answer for one simple reason: there’s no single thing, event, product or happenstance that you can identify as a turning point.

If you’re old enough to remember the Beatles breaking up, you’re old enough to remember that Wilson, along with MacGregor, Spalding, RAM and a few others, were the biggest names in golf. They made gorgeous forgings that all the Tour pros played, and they owned the market.

It’s here where we need to recognize just how much Karsten Solheim and PING (and, to a lesser extent, Tom Crow at COBRA and John Riley and Carl Ross at Lynx) permanently disrupted the golf equipment industry. Karsten gets most of the credit (Riley, Ross and Crow deserve some, too) for making forgiving, investment-cast irons a thing. By the mid-‘80s, forged iron sales were down 30 percent and wood sales were down nearly 40 percent.

Wilson Golf

The legacy brands, including Wilson, were slow on the uptake. PING, Lynx and COBRA were joined by TaylorMade, Callaway and Tommy Armour, and together they turned the golf equipment market upside down.

Wilson’s performance and quality had nothing to do with it. The Killer Whale was, by all accounts, an excellent driver for its day. But the Big Bertha line was getting bigger every other year, COBRA had its KING driver and TaylorMade was flexing its bubble-shafted muscles.

As Wilson’s market share bled during the ‘90s, so did its Tour sponsorship efforts. Paul Lawrie won the Open Championship in ’99 with Fat Shaft irons in his bag but Wilson wouldn’t cop another major until Padraig Harrington’s three wins in 2007-2008.

A picture of Padraig Harrington

We’ve written on this subject before. You can read our old-but-still-pertinent three-part series on Wilson here. And you can read our 2020 update here.

And that’s a perfect segue into our next question …

Q: Why are people looking down on them? Wilson irons are and always have been up there with the best of them. – @Xafication

Social media, unfortunately, paints with a broad brush. I don’t think it’s a universal truth that everyone looks down on Wilson. People may overlook them but that’s not the same as looking down on them.

There’s an old saying in sales and marketing: Perception is reality. More accurately, your customers’ perception is your reality. We’ve already discussed why Wilson today isn’t what the Wilson of yesterday was. It took a long time for golf’s pecking order to change and nothing that happened with Wilson happened in a vacuum.

Wilson Dynapower Forged irons

In golf, as in any industry, it’s easy to forget what business you’re really in. Are you in the business of selling what you make or are you in the business of making what your customers want to buy? There’s a difference.

By the ‘90s, the market had shifted. Historically, market shifts are never driven by market leaders. Disruptors drive market shifts. Karsten was king of the disruptors followed by Ely Callaway, Tom Crow and TaylorMade’s Mark King. It’s kind of the natural order of things.

Look at it this way. In the ‘50s, Elvis was King. But by 1964, it was all Beatlemania, all the time, Elvis was an afterthought and the King never reclaimed his throne. And the teenagers who bought up Elvis records in the ‘50s weren’t teenagers anymore. The new generation of teens loved the Fab Four. Elvis was yesterday’s news.

Wilson Staff Model golf balls.

It’s the same thing, only different, with Wilson. At least three golfing generations have come of age in the Era of the Big Five. Callaway, TaylorMade, Titleist and PING are front and center while COBRA is head-table adjacent. Mizuno and PXG have their spots while everyone else is at the kids’ table.

Wilson, I would say, is looking to join Mizuno and PXG.

Q: What are their plans to continue to compete with the bigger-name club makers?
@PureIronSpite

We took a peek under that particular tent a couple of weeks ago in our interview with Wilson Global Marketing Director Markus McCaine. But the big-picture answer might come as a surprise to you if you’re the least bit cynical.

It’s innovation.

You might not think of “innovation” when you think of Wilson. But understand that you don’t get to be a 110-year-old company without being innovative. Sometimes the innovation works and sometimes it doesn’t but Wilson is an innovation leader in every sport in which it participates. You may have scoffed at Driver vs Driver but you can’t argue it wasn’t original. And you may have thought the Triton was loud and the USGA kerfuffle was amusing but there hasn’t been a more adjustable and customizable driver introduced in the past 20 years.

While Wilson didn’t invent the player’s distance category for irons, it certainly has helped define it. Starting with the C300 Forged in 2018, Wilson player’s distance irons have finished no lower than fourth overall in our Most Wanted Testing. Wilson jumped on face-flexing technology early with Power Holes and it has leveraged being part of a multi-billion-dollar sporting goods empire by being one of the first to use AI in product development.

Don’t underestimate the power of Wilson’s 2024 lineup. The new Dynapower Forged irons are getting plenty of industry buzz, and the Staff Model Blades and CBs are drop-dead sexy. The Triad golf ball was a solid performer in the MyGolfSpy Ball Lab testing and the new Staff Model balls show promise.

Wilson Staff Model irons.

Will all of this leapfrog Wilson Golf into instant Mizuno status or will it threaten the Big Five? Not right away. The status quo is the status quo for a reason. The machine resists change and shifts take a long time. Remember, Karsten et al started disrupting the golf equipment world in 1969 and it took until the mid-to-late ‘90s for the legacy OEMs to feel the hit.

McCaine’s new direction – targeting the young ball striker – is smart. That demographic doesn’t carry three decades of preconceived notions around and isn’t afraid of being different. They don’t necessarily want to play what their fathers, mothers, aunts or uncles played.

Wilson Triad Golf Ball

Q: What do they want to be? – @infogolfgearbox

In the short term, they’re not thinking of a return to the “glory years.” That’s unrealistic for several reasons. As part of Wilson Sporting Goods, Wilson Golf is a business unit. As a business unit, it has to grow profitably and responsibly. Given where they are in terms of market share and the relative strength of the Big Five, growing profitably and responsibly means growing slowly and steadily.

Ask anyone at Wilson and they’ll tell you flat out: “We’re an irons company.” Through all of Wilson’s ups and downs, it has consistently produced excellent irons and this year’s bumper crop is no different. We’ll see how MyGolfSpy Most Wanted testing shakes out but, in my limited personal testing, the Staff Model Blades, CBs and Dynapower Forged irons are next-level good.

Additionally, the Staff Model ZM wedges are a quantum leap over Wilson’s previous wedge offerings.

That’s a long-winded non-answer. What do they want to be? I’d say their ultimate goal is to be viewed on the same level as a Mizuno: a maker of high-quality, high-performing irons.

Q: Why are the drivers/irons so much cheaper than PING, Titleist, etc? Always played PING but am tempted to try Wilson.@Reneildo

You’ve noticed that too, huh?  As sweet as Wilson’s 2024 irons lineup looks, I was surprised at the pricing.

In a good way.

Wilson Staff Model irons

The Staff Model Blades and CBs are $1,199.99 for a seven-piece set. That’s $200 less than comparable sets from Mizuno and Titleist and $300 less than the PING Blueprint and Callaway Apex lines.

Dynapower Forged pricing was even more startling. The Big Five’s player’s distance offerings are typically $1,200 to $1,400. The Wilson Dynapower Forged comes in at $999.99 with the KBS Tour Lite shaft.

And don’t even get us started on the value Wilson’s Infinite Putter line brings to the table.

Wilson Infinite putters

McCaine told us a few weeks ago that Wilson is working to enhance the direct-to-consumer sales portal on its website. Seeing as how all the premium space at the big retailers is already occupied, it’s a smart move. As McCaine told us, Wilson is intentionally targeting the younger golfer and that golfer has few qualms about buying stuff online, even golf clubs.

That said, Wilson certainly isn’t forsaking traditional retail. There are still a lot of golfers who won’t buy unless they try and won’t buy unless they’re custom-fitted. Both are impossible without a brick-and-mortar presence.

Pricing is a double-edged sword. Complaining about price has become a blood sport for golfers. We hate high prices because they’re, well, high. But we also know deep down that a high price indicates high quality and performance, even though we may outwardly demean it.

Conversely, if something is lower-priced, it can’t possibly be as good as the higher-priced alternative. My wife will routinely buy the higher-priced alternative of anything. “Why take a chance?” she says. “Get the good one.” We all do it or at least think it.

The growing direct-to-consumer companies have carved out a solid and profitable niche but have yet to break that mindset. DTC is growing but traditional brick-and-mortar still rules. Wilson seems to be straddling the line. They still need that retail presence, but Guerilla Marketing 101 says that if you can’t find a level playing field at retail, find a different playing field that is level.

Q: They clearly have great irons, but their wood and hybrid products don’t seem to perform as well. Do they have a development plan or goals for their woods in both the short and long term? – @Billy5174

The broad brush of social media strikes again.

If you review our Most Wanted Testing, you’ll find a handful of solid- to excellent-performing Wilson metalwoods. Wilson Golf doesn’t dominate the medal stand like Callaway, PING, TaylorMade and COBRA but they can be sneaky good if you know where to look. If yards per dollar is a metric you care about, Wilson does bring some value.

Wilson Staff Dynapower metal woods

The 2023 Wilson Dynapower is the reigning Most Wanted Fairway Wood, copping top honors in last year’s testing (and not for nothing, it’s the first fairway I haven’t hated since my MacGregor Tourney persimmon). The Dynapower hybrid finished fourth overall last year, just a couple of points from being tied for second.

Drivers, however, get the headlines, date the cheerleaders and drive the sales cycles. The Dynapower Carbon and Dynapower Titanium both performed well in pockets. The Carbon finished third overall in accuracy but it’s doubtful anyone will rush out to buy this year’s third-most accurate driver.

That said, Dynapower outperformed its predecessor, the D9 (which was a big step backward in performance compared to its predecessor, the D7). Wilson Golf has had some sneaky performers over the past decade but driver is a point of emphasis for the company.  

Dynapower hybrid

Q: Their putters always get such good reviews yet I hardly ever see them promoted.
– @mikewitchter

Don’t get me started on this one, Mike – and we need to set a date for another round at Pine Hills.

The Wilson Infinite putter lineup is solid from top to bottom. The Spider-styled Buckingham has been an outstanding performer for us since its release two years ago. The Staff Model putters, designed with input from the legendary Clay Long, are also excellent performers.

Wilson Staff Model putters

Why aren’t they promoted more? Again, Wilson positions itself as an irons company and that’s where its focus lies. The Odyssey, PING, Scotty, TaylorMade party is a hard one to crash. The pricing conundrum is also a factor. “How can this $130 Wilson Golf putter be better than a $400 Scotty Cameron?” The brain can’t comprehend what the eyeballs are seeing. Better to take the $400 safe bet than the $130 risk is how it often plays out. (Ask my wife.)

I’m anxious to see how Wilson Fit AI turns out for putters (not to mention wedges and metalwoods). It’s a fascinating technology that captures more than 100 swing characteristics and then leverages hundreds of thousands of swings to fit you into a club within five to 10 minutes. That gives the fitter an excellent starting point to add tweaks and expertise.

WilsonFit AI is available now for iron fittings. The long-range plan is to roll wedges, woods and putters into the system in the coming years. Given the current state of putter fitting, an AI tool such as this can do wonders to get golfers into the right flatstick.

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John Barba

John Barba

John Barba

John is an aging, yet avid golfer, writer, 6-point-something handicapper living back home in New England after a 22-year exile in Minnesota. He loves telling stories, writing about golf and golf travel, and enjoys classic golf equipment. “The only thing a golfer needs is more daylight.” - BenHogan

John Barba

John Barba

John Barba





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      Gregg

      3 weeks ago

      If I could test there lefthand driver without buying it and only in one loft I would happily like to try it out . I have 2 wedges and I like there balls .In the market for new driver there’s and pxg and muzuno are the only ones I haven’t tried

      Reply

      Craig W.

      4 weeks ago

      I’ve been using Wilson Staff blades (FG Tour 59’s & FG Tour 100’s) for about 10 years now. Love them! I also have a set of FG Tour V2’s.
      Also use the Wilson Staff Infinite Bucktown putter and a Wilson Staff 8802 putter.
      And typically buy the latest Wilson golf balls. My favorite has been the FG Tour ball. Have also used the Wilson Duo Soft ball at times as well.
      I love Wilson Staff golf equipment.it suits me and my playing style nicely. ⛳️

      Reply

      Greginrva

      4 weeks ago

      The 2024 staff tour ball is fantastic. It’s the first Wilson Ball I’ve used in decades and I really enjoy it. Their yellow is great and easy to track. I tried out the ai fit and was impressed. It picked out clubs that fit me best even when I tried to prove it wrong.

      Reply

      Sindo

      4 weeks ago

      I’ve been playing Wilson irons for about 5 years now. Started out with Di11 clubs, then got D7s. Moved on to the V6s, and later snapped up an offer at the end of 2023 for a brand new set of CBs, 4-PW for EUR430/$460. I love the V6s, really only got the CBs (which are very similar; the top line looks a tiny bit wider to my eye) because of the price. I liked the D7s to begin with, but a couple of the power hole inserts fell out of my 7-iron and PW, which is incredibly annoying. I replaced them with D9s, and sometimes play them in winter conditions. They’re fine, great trajectories and distance, but look a lot clunkier than the very appealing-to-the-eye V6s and CBs. I love their looks and also that they’re a bit unusual at courses I play. They go well with my Cobra woods, I find.

      Reply

      WYBob

      4 weeks ago

      When I was a kid and started playing, and then caddying as a teen, the Big Three were Hogan, MacGregor, and Wilson (incl. Haig Ultra). Glad to see their focus return towards premium offerings and away from their failed attempt at low-cost mass marketing at big box discount retailers. Of the three, Wilson is the only one not to have gone through multiple closures and then a relaunching by new owners. They have solid new products, now they just need to get their “stuff” together regarding product placement, pricing, and promotion. To become successful long term they need to become a disruptor and sign a couple of marque tour players to represent the brand. Back in the day, they had Arnold Palmer, and they now need players of equal status on their staff to raise their profile and move away from being a fringe brand. Great products alone are not enough to raise their profile among the avid golfer population.

      Reply

      WBN

      4 weeks ago

      I bought the D-7 irons a few years ago and my handicap dropped 2 full points. They just felt good and were priced well
      below the others I looked at. I have since moved on to Titleist and Mizuno but I have still kept the W/S D-7’s. They are
      just too good to let go. I also played Wilson Staff in my teen years.

      Reply

      daja

      4 weeks ago

      I’d say they seem to be right there with Cleveland and Tour Edge, not your hi dollar clubs but good values for the money. If you can hit them well, then why not… save a few bucks for other things like playing,d replacing balls and gloves etc.

      Reply

      HikingMike

      4 weeks ago

      Ok, I really like this article, and I think it was needed and timely. I started this season playing the Wilson Triad ball and I like it. And I basically have my eye on all their clubs now. Let me ask the independent shop nearby if they carry them, and if not, suggest they do. It would be a good differentiator for them because Wilson clubs are not in my nearest Golf Galaxy.

      Reply

      John

      4 weeks ago

      Wilson Golf Clubs are beautiful,easy to hit long and just a great golf club.

      Reply

      Steve-o

      4 weeks ago

      MGS has been on the Wilson story for years. Probably ten years ago a long story on how it got to be a mess. Then a follow up and recently the pieces on the new folks and their plan along with intro stores on the clubs and ZM Wedge.Marketing mistakes, big boxes and the rest have been worn out by all of us.. Looks like a new chapter is being written. Hope it comes with a happy ending.

      Reply

      DennisB…

      4 weeks ago

      Aye Aye…Cheers, Mate~!

      Reply

      Steve-o

      4 weeks ago

      Excellent article. Wilson is my favorite brand. Love that the brand is targeting a younger consumer. Many of these comments are from older guys who think doing the same old thing will somehow work better. I am all for new shield and fresh ideas. will take time and it will take a home run in the Drive-3w-hybrid area. Even better cosmetics will help them since the DP WOOD line plays well. If you don’t try the ball you’re missing out. The Staff and Triad models are excellent balls.I think they are on their way. I just tried Fit AI and loved how easy it was. Nailed my iron and shaft in seconds.

      Reply

      Steve-o

      4 weeks ago

      Forgot to add thought on the putters. I played Bucktown and had used a Bettianardi before that. It is not just a value it’s a hell of a putter.

      Reply

      Jim F.

      4 weeks ago

      I recently purchased an Infinite putter. Needless to say, I was impressed! The feel was fantastic and the double milling puts a nice, tight, end over end roll on the ball. Consequently, my distance control improved dramatically. I was also impressed by its balance and resistance to twisting. I liked it so much that I sold my Scotty Cameron.

      Reply

      Jim

      4 weeks ago

      I was fitted back in February using the new AI system. I ordered DynaPower forged irons and just got them a couple of weeks ago. I had D9 forged and like the DynaPower version better. They feel a bit more forgiving. Thinking about ordering new Wilson Wedges as well as I’ve heard some good things about them. Over all, I have a mixed manufacturer bag. I’ve played every iron brand including some JDM brands and Wilson is in the bag for the long haul.

      Reply

      BH

      4 weeks ago

      I just wish I could find a place to demo their irons…

      Reply

      Tom R

      4 weeks ago

      The staff progressives are still my favorite iron I have ever played. Yes, I am dating myself!!!

      Reply

      KC Nix

      4 weeks ago

      I feel you brother. When I was rehabbing from a torn rotator the doc would only let me hit punch shots. My trusty old Progressive 1 iron went back in the bag and the guys in my regular group freaked. They had never seen a 1 iron much less somebody stripe one. Dating myself, the Tour Blades I played in high school are still some of my favorite forged sticks.

      Reply

      Tom R

      3 weeks ago

      Nice…. I recently got a fitting, ended up in the Srixon ZX7 MKII, the profile is very similar, I love them.

      TenBuck

      4 weeks ago

      Until Wilson starts to realize and embrace technology enhanced game improvement irons, they won’t move the needle much more than they have. Don’t get me wrong, their forged irons are some of the best, and look good also, but forget irons get you only so far. Woods are decent but need more shaft options, wedges are OK but also need more customized options, putters are meh, their ball line up is good and finally they need to get back to the distinct W/S shield instead of just a “shield”. To me there is no Wilson Golf without the W/S….it’s almost like Titleist scrapping the script T for a block T.

      Reply

      Mr.Dutch

      4 weeks ago

      There irons are gorgeous. So are the wedges and the staff putter line. The woods may perform well, but they look on the cheaper end. Personally, I don’t think there is a blade on the market outside Muira that is as good looking as the Wilson and the CBs look just as good as the T100s. It’s a great brand w/ a weak marketing department.

      They need to improve the looks of the woods and they need to get a good young pro on staff. Paddy and Woodland aren’t convincing anyone that these products are cool or best in class. It wont be cheap to steal Nelly or Ludvig from Titleist, but that is the type of face they need associated w/ the brand.

      Reply

      Mark R

      4 weeks ago

      I’d definitely consider Wilson Dynapower forged clubs for my next set of players distance clubs.

      The new Staff wedges look excellent. Heard good things about Wilson putters.

      Not sure if the Wilson driver is ready for prime time. Won’t be changing to Wilson balls anytime soon.

      Reply

      HeftyLefty

      4 weeks ago

      I believe Wilson’s problem, along with Ram and MacGregor was they were golf companies that were bought out by conglomerates. The Ben Hogan Company is another example. They also were slow to provide a forgiving investment cast option. Primarily though, the new owners knew little about golf. As a generalization, golf was growing and golf was expected to provide the same type of sales and returns as all other consumer products. When it didn’t it was de-emphasized or eliminated.

      Reply

      Lou

      4 weeks ago

      I’m a big fan of Wilson Staff. Played Wilson from age 15 to about 40. Used a Wilson Staff 300 Driver. Made my 1st hole in one with a Wilson Staff ball. Glad to see the company is making a comeback. Would like to see Wilson in more pro shops.

      Reply

      Robin C Owens

      4 weeks ago

      I really enjoy Wilson Staff I always have something Wilson in my bag .
      Now I have the D9 Forged irons , they are gorgeous and are they long.
      I wish they would say why they fired the old boss, but I can sorta see why .
      Good luck my favorite brand Wilson Staff.

      Reply

      Owen

      4 weeks ago

      Several years ago, I randomly demo’d their D7 Forged irons. I had already made the decision to go with Honma TR20s, but wanted to look at something that was $400 less. I was AMAZED at their feel and performance.

      Although I love my Honmas, late last year I was looking for a more forgiving club for the winter. I bought the D9 Forged on discount remembering how well the D7s were. It was a GREAT decision. They were priced great and perform amazingly! They have me doubting I’m going back to Honma.

      Consider me a converted Wilson fan. Great equipment.

      Reply

      EBM

      4 weeks ago

      As usual, great article John. In mid 90’s retook up golf. Played Wilson X-31 Plus cavity backs. In 2000 set out for new set, it has been Cleveland irons since, TA5, CG`16’s now Launcher XL. They just feel and perform with a great price value. Yes Wilson lost its way. My career involved product sourcing and manufacturing in Asia. One of my vendors had a division that produced Wilson accessories. New Wilson VP walked into his office, put his feet on the CEO’s desk, said there was a 10% price reduction across the board. My vendor fulfilled all existing Wilson PO’s. Never accepted another Wilson PO.

      Reply

      Stuart moss

      4 weeks ago

      Have played with Wilson all my life, till now (single figure golfer), quality brand without the Research & development prices of the other club manufactures. Producing innovative products including balls but very difficult to get your hands on or fitting in the North West. Wilson have doubled their prices to put themselves into the premier market of clubs and now I have moved from Wilson due to to price point (might as well spend 10% more and get another manufactures clubs – poor marketing choice by Wilson).

      Reply

      Shea

      4 weeks ago

      Stu, dude…did you not read the article, or read the recent Wilson reviews?? Wilson is performing just as well, if not better (Players Distance, Metal wood) than the other OEMs. If you want to pay 10% more for the other OEMs then you are buying their marketing hype!

      Obviously people can have their own preferences, but the data shows the Wilson quality is there.

      Reply

      Stev

      4 weeks ago

      Great write up. Very interesting on a brand that always seemed like a “less than” brand for me when I got into golf about 5-6 years ago. It just felt “cheap” and dated.

      With that being said, buying the Wilson Buckingham on a whim was one of my best golf purchases. It’s been a game changing, stroke-saving putter. I’m in the market for a new driver and will need to give them a look.

      Reply

      Mike

      4 weeks ago

      Years ago I played the 1972 Dynapower window backs (also called button backs). A little later I played the staff blades that had the removable weights. Both clubs were excellent.
      I’ve played Titleist, Haig Ultra, Hogan Directors and Hogan Apex Grind, Srixon, but more recently have steered towards Ping.

      At 63 I’ve decided that my Ping I210s (3i thru wedge) with KBS Tour stiff shafts weren’t the best fit for me. Went and got fitted for G430s and H730s. Both were marvelous. The fitter said he had a couple other irons he’d like me to test, hiding the club back. I recognized them as the Wilson Dynapowr and Dynapowr forged. Graphite R in all of the clubs demo’s. The Wilson Dynapowr cast irons worked the best for me by far. That’s what I ended up ordering. 1 deg upright.
      I still play to a 4.8 index. Just saying don’t overlook the Wilson irons.

      Reply

      Jason S

      4 weeks ago

      Great article and answers. I remember the Wilson Fat Shaft irons, as I worked in a golf retail shop in 2000 before graduating college. They were good irons.
      There’s no doubt Wilson makes high quality, better priced equipment. Their irons (especially the 2024 lineup) have been incredible for years, and as you pointed out several hundred $$ less than the big boys.
      My overall take on what happened to Wilson is simple – marketing. Not quality products, because we know Wilson has always had that. The main reason Adam started MGS was all the marketing lies we as golfers were fed for years and years. TM, Callaway, Titleist, Ping, etc all bombarded us with advertising in magazines, on TV, and online so much so that Wilson was essentially drowned out. Not to mention that all those ads were filled with lies and half-truths in order to push sales for the big 5. I don’t really remember ever seeing Wilson follow them down that ugly road, and I’m glad they didn’t tarnish themselves that way.
      I could be wrong here, but this is what what I recall and remember, for whatever that’s worth.

      Reply

      Jeff Taverna

      4 weeks ago

      Thanks for this article on Wilson golf products. Their irons are SO good and get so little credit. I would love to see them in more pro shops muscling their way to some shelf space, or a display or loaner irons. The big 4 have the pro shops sewn up. I’d love to see some competition to bring down the colluded pricing of $600 drivers and $190 irons all the top manufacturers seem to land at now. Look at Wilson and you will find high quality products.

      Reply

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