Arccos Adds Golf Ball Capture and Analysis
Golf Technology

Arccos Adds Golf Ball Capture and Analysis

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Arccos Adds Golf Ball Capture and Analysis

With its latest update, Arccos has launched what it’s billing as the first-ever on-course ball data capture system.

Cool.

Also, what does that mean?

The simple explanation is that the Arccos Caddie app’s round settings menu has been expanded to allow the golfer to track the golf ball used during every round.

(Side note: The same menu allows the user to specify a round as casual or tournament. Enabling the latter automatically tweaks the system to what amounts to USGA conforming mode.)

As far as the ball stuff goes, all you need to do is select the ball you’re going to use for each round. It’s that easy. The app will also store your default ball.

The idea is to track performance across golf ball models. The data on the other end should give golfers the ability to compare golf balls based on real on-course data rather than—or at least in addition to—range and simulator data.

Does the ball really make a difference? If so, where (off the driver, on approach, putting) and by how much?

How Arccos Caddie Ball Capture Works

For now, Arccos ball tracking will be an input-only kind of thing. Basically, you input the ball you’re using and, well, that’s pretty much it. Wait a few months (estimates are Q1) and Arccos will give you the ability to filter/compare results across the various metrics it tracks by golf ball. It’s a key piece of the puzzle which will eventually give Arccos users a better understanding of what ball is best for them and perhaps even help Arccos identify what type of balls perform best for a given player set.

This is all roadmap/promise of a better future type stuff but, as a self-professed ball guy, it’s exciting to see increasing recognition of the golf ball as an important piece of equipment. If the Arccos on-course ball data capture system can help golfers make performance-driven decisions about the golf ball they play, all the better.

Maybe you really are better off playing a sh*t two-piece matte-finish golf ball. Maybe, but I doubt it.

Accuracy Depends on You

Of course, as with most things Arccos, responsibility for ensuring accuracy lies with the user. If the actual ball being used isn’t selected at the start of a round, the data collected, as it relates to the ball anyway, is useless.

Also implicit in the Arccos ball data capture system is the suggestion that golfers will only play one model for duration of a round. It’s the right approach, even if it’s perhaps overly optimistic.

Hopefully, it’s a means to start training good habits.

Play the same ball, people. Every round, every shot.

The Arccos update featuring on-course ball data collection and round type selection was rolled out with the latest update. There is no additional charge for the update.

For more information, visit Arccosgolf.com.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Richard Reed

      2 years ago

      I concur— pick one ball and stick with it. After a while you really get used to how a ball reacts off the club face. This is really crucial for shots on/near the green.

      I’ve stocked up on the Maxfli Tour as it has been one of the best performing balls I’ve ever used this year. I’ve also enjoyed the Snell MTB Black, TM Tour Response, Srixon Q-Star Tour, and Titleist Tour Speed, but the Maxfli’s are always on sale (for 2 dozen), locally available, and the performance (for me) has been world class.. I shot my best rounds this year with that ball (87, 83, 79) so there’s that psychological connection.

      While I enjoy all the data that technology has given the game, for a mid-high handicapper there’s no replacement for solid course management and a consistent, repeatable swing that works for you to quickly lower your scores.

      Reply

      Mike

      2 years ago

      Interesting but please, not another thing to buy (& pay for monthly). I’ll just go to my local golf store, rent their high-end simulator for an hour & go thru my clubs & balls. So for a small 1x charge annually, I s/b good.

      Reply

      Pete S

      2 years ago

      I’ve actually gotten worse since I started using Arccos. Considering selling mine to go back to playing w/o worrying about my stupid sensors tracking my data.

      Reply

      Carl S.

      2 years ago

      Totally agree. You lose focus worrying about the distance of every shot.

      Reply

      John Westall-Eyre

      2 years ago

      I’m not sure you can blame the data tracking for getting worse? I found when I started that it gave me an accurate picture of how far I actually hit it. Those 175 yard 7 irons are very rare (downhill and with the wind!) and instead it helps to predict how far I really hit it and what coin to use for a particular shot. I don’t speed much time at all tidying it up basically as I can’t be bothered. But as an on course tool it’s fantastic and greatly enhances my enjoyment of the game. Worth persisting in my opinion.

      Reply

      Kansas King

      2 years ago

      I think this is a situation where everyone is very different and have different motivations. Some find comfort in a data driven approach and other find comfort in just going out and having fun. It’s not that the data is bad, it’s just some people will find the distraction of having to deal with it is worse than what is gained.

      I’ve observed an amazing thing over my years golfing and that’s human’s have a strong ability to sense what they actually need. I didn’t use any form of rangefinder until after I got out of college and while I love the rangefinder, it does strip a certain level of judgement skill from the game. Arccos does the same thing. It takes perception out of the game. While I do think there is potential for it to improve scores, I think it’s largely turning golf into a less dynamic game. If it were solely up to me, I would say the caddies for pros should be able to do nothing more than help with yardages and carrying clubs.

      My fear of trying to remove every judgement element of the game outside of actually making the swing is that golf will turn into the equivalent of bowling. Sure, scores may improve a little if you know exactly where a 7-iron will go based on the wind and barometric pressure of the day but solely focusing on the stroke seems to kind of take the skill out of the game. I’ll be clear, I’m not against these advances that things like Arccos provide, but I think we just need to be careful with what is allowed to be used during a round of competitive golf and by competitive, I’m not talking solely sanctioned and governed events. I’m also talking about Saturday morning when you join a group of 10 or 20 others that are are recreationally competing for fun. Even from a Saturday morning group perspective, is it fair that Bob is checking his phone to see exactly what club to use in every situation when everyone else is using nothing more than a rangefinder?

      Where is the line?

      Rob Dallie

      2 years ago

      What’s the point in recording ball data when the product doesn’t record the data it was designed to do. I have to edit each hole after a round as shots do not get recorded.

      Reply

      Steve Whitaker

      2 years ago

      Interested in results!

      Reply

      Barry Schwartz

      2 years ago

      I’ve been testing different balls (ProV1 and x, Snell MTB and X and Vice Pro and Pro Plus during handicap season – playing the same ball for at least 3-5 rounds to get good data. Now that handicap season is over in Maryland, I play a bunch of different Tour level balls (TP$ and x, Chromesoft and X, etc) that I find on the course during the summer. Under winter conditions, it doesn’t seem to make a whole lot of difference. in terms of distance and spin,. It’s a good way to use those free balls.

      Reply

      Matt Barton

      2 years ago

      This is great to hear as this was one of the feature I mentioned when surveyed by ARCCOS. Nice to see them act on feedback they have received. ARCCOS seems to constantly evolve to make the app better!

      Reply

      David V

      2 years ago

      Yay! More data to track! Actually I think that this is a great idea. Testing balls in a hitting bay is “fun” but it’s not the same as using them on course. I would love to have this feature to track real world performance of the ball. Too bad I’m a Shotscope user.

      Reply

      Chuck Steward

      2 years ago

      Playing Pro v1 and Pro v1x

      Reply

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