AskMyGolfSpy Vol. 42 – Answering your Titleist AVX Questions
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AskMyGolfSpy Vol. 42 – Answering your Titleist AVX Questions

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AskMyGolfSpy Vol. 42 – Answering your Titleist AVX Questions

AskMyGolfSpy is an opportunity to submit questions to our experts here at MGS.

You can pass along your questions to the team on Twitter,Facebook, Instagram or right here in the comments section below! 

Normally we cover a range of topics on AskMyGolfSpy but today we’re focusing on the new Titleist AVX golf ball

Q: What does “AVX” stand for?  

A 2024 Titleist AVX golf ball

The original story is that the AVX was designed to be an Alternative to the Pro V1 and Pro V1x.  

Q: Why did Titleist change the cover on AVX?  

In a word, I think it comes down to capacity. Part of what we haven’t discussed much this year is that Titleist plans to lean into Left Dash more than ever. That means continuing to increase awareness and ramping up production so that it’s nearly as easy to find as Pro V1 and Pro V1x (both of which need to stay on shelves). 

With that, something had to give and with the discontinuation of Tour Speed, Ball Plant 2 had some available capacity (that includes the machines to apply TPU covers) so there’s some logic in the switch. 

Q: So Titleist just took the guts out of AVX and put a Tour Speed cover on it? 

Titleist has discontinued the Tour Speed golf ball

No. I suppose the first part is roughly true. The guts (the core and the mantle) are inarguably still AVX, albeit with the upgrades discussed in our initial story.

The cover is most definitely not Tour Speed

A couple of points here. First, the Tour Speed cover is more of a high-flight design—the kind of thing you’d find on most non-Tour urethane offerings. Within its space, AVX has always been somewhat of an outlier as it’s designed to produce a lower, more penetrating trajectory. If you were to stick the Tour Speed cover on AVX, you’d end up with a ball that’s nothing like what golfers expect from AVX. 

The second point is that while both Tour Speed and the new AVX feature TPU (injection-molded, thermoplastic urethane) covers, the urethane formulation is completely new and unique to AVX. 

Paraphrasing a bit from what I’ve been told, except for a different core, a different mantle, a different dimple pattern and urethane cover formulation, the new AVX is exactly like Tour Speed. 

Also worth a mention, AVX is roughly five compression points softer than Tour Speed was. It’s not huge but it’s not nothing, either. 

Q: I wish Titleist would just release the Pro V1 Left Dot and sunset the AVX. 

Q2 Financial Reports
“Left Dot” is Tour-only version of the Pro V1 that’s lower flying and lower spinning.

Not a question but we’re not picky. 

For purely selfish reasons, I’m with you but the reality is that AVX has carved out its own niche within the Titleist ball family. If Titleist were to ditch AVX in favor of Left Dot, the likelihood is that a subset of Pro V1, Pro V1x and Left Dash users would move into Left Dot while a not-insignificant number of AVX players would move into somebody else’s golf ball. 

While there are some similarities between AVX and Left Dot, AVX is meaningfully softer, which is part of the appeal. 

Q: How does AVX compare to Pro V1?  

the back of the Titleist AVX golf ball box shows the comparison to a Pro V1

Keeping in mind that these comparisons are true only within the Titleist lineup and that, over time, performance specs change, the current Titleist urethane lineup breaks out like this: 

  • AVX: low flight, low spin, soft feel 
  • Pro V1: mid flight, mid spin, mid firm feel 
  • Pro V1x: high flight, high spin, firm feel 
  • Pro V1x Left Dash: high flight, low spin, firm feel 

Q: Can I test these for free? 

You had your chance. You missed it. So, no.

Q: Why is there no RCT (Radar Capture Technology) option in the new AVX? 

an image of the core of the Titleist Pro V1 RCT golf ball

According to Titleist, there is a handful of reasons why RCT hasn’t made it into the new AVX. One of those reasons is that Ball Plant 2, where the new AVX is made, doesn’t have the tools necessary to produce RCT. 

Q: How do I know if AVX is right for me? 

The best way to find out is to get fitted for a golf ball. I know that’s easier said than done. I think you’ll see something soon to simplify the process (that’s a teaser) but, for now, I’d recommend taking AVX and something else with you out on the course. It shouldn’t take long before you get a sense of what you like the feel of off the putter, what stops when you need it to around the green and what’s going to maximize your distance off the tee and with long irons. 

While it would be nice if ball fitting were simple, I’ve found it’s more a process of elimination. Get rid of what doesn’t work until you’re left with what does. 

Q: Why is AVX cheaper than Titleist’s other urethane offerings? 

The 2024 Titleist urethane golf ball lineup
Priced at $49.99, the new AVX is less expensive than Titleist’s other urethane offerings.

My hunch is that it’s a combination of things. 

With Tour Speed, Titleist kinda established the idea that it would charge less for TPU than cast urethane products. There’s no reason why that couldn’t change but it’s at least likely true that, despite being made alongside Pro V1 with much of the same technology as Pro V1, many consumers view AVX as not quite a Pro V1. 

While Titleist will tell you there’s no drop in quality associated with the cover and factory change, for those who pay attention to such things, not being made next to Pro V1 changes the equation a bit—at least it does for me.  

Finally, from a strategic perspective, if you’re going to say that cast urethane offers the best performance for Tour-level balls, charging less for the same technology in your non-Tour ball that many of your competitors use in their Tour balls is a subtle way of suggesting their tech isn’t quite as good as yours. 

Call it the Fairhaven Finger. 

Q: Why do manufacturers make so many types of balls? 

Not specific to AVX but a good question, nonetheless. 

A full-service golf ball company needs to offer something to satisfy the needs of both performance and preference-driven golfers. 

The performance part mandates balls with different flight and spin profiles. Neither Pro V1, Pro V1x, Left Dash nor AVX will meet the performance needs of every golfer but between the four of them, most golfers are covered. 

Of course, with prices starting at $50, not everybody is going to be onboard with the plan. That’s why Titleist (and basically everyone else) sells balls in the $20-$30 and $30-$40 ranges. 

Great, but what if none of those balls (and let’s add Tour Soft to the conversation) is as soft as you want a golf ball to be? 

Because there are more than a few feel-driven golfers, Titleist offers TruFeel for less than $25. If you don’t want to spend a lot, but want distance instead of feel, that’s where Velocity comes in. 

Basically, everyone is trying to cover as many permutations as it can sensibly fit on retail shelves. As things like color and patterns become increasingly popular, those permutations will only increase. 

The goal is to offer something for nearly everyone at nearly every conceivable (or at least tenable) price point. 

More Questions?  

As always, if you have any questions for the MGS crew (and they don’t have to be about the golf ball), drop them below for a chance to be featured in next week’s AskMyGolfSpy!  

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Steve

      3 months ago

      Hit the last Gen and new Gen versions in a sim using a driver (Stealth2+ and Qi10) and 8i. For me I got ~300rpm less w/new ball and the Qi10 (standard) than the Stealth2+ w/either version and ~10 yards more carry. 8i spun ~300rpm more w/new ball but distance was the same w/tighter dispersion. Kind of reminds me if the “stop and drop” of the original ProV1.

      I’ll be switching to the new AVX.

      Reply

      JR BAMA1969

      3 months ago

      I have played the AVX for a couple of years now and I love it. I have 2 that I retired after playing 72 holes with each of them. They were still playable and not looking too bad (in spite of some of the places I hit them.)
      Separate Question: Last year Titleist sent me a sleeve of balls with the word TEST in place of the model name. The correspondence with the balls referred to them as 2024 Prototypes. The best feel, longest ball I have ever played. Is there a way to find out what ball I was testing? The descriptions of the new AVX seems to match the protptype I tested.

      Reply

      Golfinnutinva

      3 months ago

      I’m still at a loss as to why the price increase?! On all of the premium balls

      Reply

      Mike

      3 months ago

      I didn’t have great luck with the AVX. Unfortunately, in at least w/ prior years versions, they wore terribly. After a few holes they look like I played 18.

      Reply

      Duffer1

      3 months ago

      The Tour Speed is a great ball, performs well in your tests, and cheaper.
      Should I run out and buy all I can?

      Reply

      Roger

      3 months ago

      What compression is the New AVX rated at? Call me old-school, but it is one of the specs I look for when purchasing. Also love that you put out charts rating all ball specs and testing. Thanks for all the info you provide to the golfing nation on everything.

      Reply

      Adam M

      3 months ago

      Man I wish they would have just called it the Pro V1 Left Dot. The added AVX terminology is so confusing for customers and it would have greatly simplified the line-up of Titleist’s premium offerings

      Reply

      Jon

      3 months ago

      I’d love to see a comparison of spin and ball flight off a robot. This would show how the different balls react with the same swing and quantify the high/low flight and spin. For now it’s not clear if an AVX spins 1000 rpm less than a V1x or 100 rpm. Is the flight 30′ lower or 1′ lower. Would be nice to be able to see it all mapped out.

      Reply

      Scott

      3 months ago

      How would compare the AVX to the Maxfli Tour?

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      3 months ago

      Maxfli Tour is much closer to a Pro V1.

      Closest comp in the Maxfli lineup would be Maxfli Tour S, but even that’s not a great comparison. AVX has traditionally been an outlier in the marketplace. It’s low flight, low spin, while most everything else in the same segment of the market is high flight low spin. There’s not much it compares with.

      Reply

      WYBob

      3 months ago

      Thanks for clarifying what Titleist is trying to accomplish with their new AVX and how it fits within their ball portfolio. I hope they have found a way to increase the durability of the TPU cover, however only time and testing will tell. That said, the good news is that by moving AVX production to Ball Plant 2 they are opening up capacity at Ball plant 3. Hopefully they do increase the production of Left Dash, and ultimately offer it in an Optic Yellow cover (for those of us with older eyes). That would be the bigger win for me.

      Reply

      Richard J.

      3 months ago

      Why aren’t all golf balls balanced before the direction making is placed? I have Check Go Pro I use on all my golf balls and have found that the Titleist Pro V products to be the most consistent where that is concerned. But, I’m only talking about a small percentage 20-25% of the balls. Except for Maxfli that does balance theirs during manufacture. Wilson Triad also has a process of balance they use in manufacture. The rest are hit and miss. I can’t understand this!

      Reply

      Steve King

      3 months ago

      Really like the colorful descriptions you come up with. Especially the mayonnaise distributor Costco! LOL.

      Reply

      HikingMike

      3 months ago

      AVX: low flight, low spin, soft feel
      Pro V1: mid flight, mid spin, mid firm feel
      Pro V1x: high flight, high spin, firm feel
      Pro V1x Left Dash: high flight, low spin, firm feel

      Is that low short game spin? If so, the Pro V1x Left Dash is like the opposite of everything I need. Now where is the low flight and high/mid spin? :)

      Reply

      David D

      3 months ago

      I am wondering if you could quantify what “low Spin” means in terms of the other balls in the line up.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      3 months ago

      The ‘low spin’ description is often a bit of a catch-all, but with everyone trying to drive driver spin down and greenside spin up, the description best fits performance in the iron game.

      All of that said, on a relative basis, the comparisons hold true throughout the bag. Pro V1x will be the highest spinning across the board. AVX will be similar to the others off the driver, but off the irons you should notice the low spin. Around the green, it’s going to spin less than Pro V1, but not by a massive number. As I said in our First Look article, if Titleist tweaking the design to do things AVX hasn’t traditionally done, it doesn’t take much before AVX isn’t AVX anymore.

      Reply

      Daniel V

      3 months ago

      Appreciate it, but can you just say if it is similar in distance, spins more or less on approach shots and how it spins on short game… add how it compares feel wise when you putt it? I like the old days where the box had the picture showing the ball flight and different names lol.. I’m not even sure I saw a direct price comparison.. Any thoughts against AVX vs Maxfli?

      Reply

      Ivan G

      3 months ago

      I primarily use the PRov1x, however when it is windy I switch to the AVX. I find the AVX an underrated ball and I am about a 3 handicap and to be honest I do not notice much of a difference in spin between the X and the AVX (I know theoretically there is, but I am not good enough to notice).
      Better in the wind, a pretty good golf ball.

      Reply

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