Cobra 3D Metal Jet Printing: The New Revolution?
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Cobra 3D Metal Jet Printing: The New Revolution?

Cobra 3D Metal Jet Printing: The New Revolution?

Are you one of the many convinced there are no real frontiers left for golf equipment? Even the hardest-core dreamers believe we’re pretty much maxed-out. With that as a backdrop, the recent announcement by Cobra that it has begun leveraging 3D Metal Jet printing qualifies as a Grade-A big deal. It may very well be the next great revolution in golf equipment manufacturing.

That’s right, manufacturing. 3D printing has been a valuable R&D tool for years, but Cobra is jumping with both feet into golf club manufacturing using HP 3D Metal Jet printers.

And the deeper you dive into the possibilities, the more it becomes clear that this technology has the potential to completely change damn near everything.

Photo Credit: Digital Alloys

Brave New World

“We first started thinking about 3D metal printing maybe eight, ten years ago, thinking it would be 15 to 20 years out,” Mike Yagley, Cobra’s VP of Innovation and AI, tells MyGolfSpy. “Here is it less than a decade later and we’re doing it.”

You’re probably familiar with 3D printing: an actual “printer” connected to a computer that squirts out a three-dimensional object. 3D printing has been used in the golf space for years; first to create plastic mockups and then to create actual prototypes.

There are two problems with 3D printing metal parts, however. It’s very slow and it’s very expensive.

That’s where HP comes in.

‘We’ve been hoping a day would come where we could use it for something besides just prototyping,” says Ryan Roach, Cobra’s Senior Principle Innovation Engineer. “The Metal Jet technology HP is using may not replace all the conventional manufacturing methods we currently use. But it’s a heck of a lot closer than we thought it would be from both a cost and a supply standpoint.”

How close? While details are scant, the first product from Cobra 3D Metal Jet printing will hit the stores this fall.

Photo Credit: Digital Alloys

The Technology

If you want to make a golf club, you have three choices. You can forge it, you can cast it, or you can mill it. All three methods are considered subtractive manufacturing, meaning material is machined away – or subtracted – until you have a finished product. 3D printing is additive manufacturing. Material is added together and fused – layer by layer – under computer control to make a 3D object.

As mentioned earlier, printing metal objects is common. The process, however, has been far too slow and expensive (up to 50 times slower and 10 times the cost of traditional manufacturing) to be anything other than an R&D tool.

“It accelerates the design process, which is a good thing,” says Roach. “But since we have to use traditional methods for production, we can’t take full advantage of all the benefits additive [printing] can bring to the design. It buys us time, but not performance.”

So, in theory, R&D could create a revolutionary – and conforming – design that could help the ball fly farther and straighter and with better sound and feel. A 3D printer could then whip up a prototype. However, if traditional manufacturing can’t actually mass-produce it, the idea dies on the vine.

“Complicated shapes with holes and undercuts can’t be made with traditional manufacturing,” says Roach. “Additive enables designs with voids, channels, and even living hinges that are virtually impossible to make with other methods. And we can do it without adding significant cost to the process.”

Metal Jet printing technology makes it possible. HP first introduced Metal Jet printing, which is adapted from its desktop inkjet printer, just two years ago. The company says it can squirt out production-grade metal parts some 50 times faster and at a significantly lower cost than other 3D metal printing technology.

“If you wanted to invest in a metal printing machine, it might have been a million dollars or more just for one machine,” says Yagley. “The costs have come way down. HP has come up with a way to make 3D metal printing cost-effective for manufacturing.”

Golfer Benefits

The walls between what R&D can invent and what manufacturing can make are clearly tumbling down. That’s cool, but what does it mean for you?

“We can now take full advantage of the design space,” says Roach. “We can place metal only where it’s needed without some unnecessary metal going along for the ride in order to manufacture the part. Manufacturing with Metal Jet means inefficient designs will no longer be tolerated.”

If you think about traditional casting or forging, the limitations are obvious. Intricate designs that could improve face flexibility simply can’t be done. Complicated lightweight lattice structures are virtually impossible. With 3D Metal Jet printing, if you can imagine it, you can make it.

“We can move mass around to lighten up a structure but still make it stiff enough and strong enough,” says Yagley. “We can put the CG right where we want it, and then build the structure around it. It’ll give you the resilience you need, it’ll sound good, it’ll feel good. And we can move mass to where you really need it.”

And it can happen quickly. Cobra, in conjunction with Metal Injection Molding leader Parmatech, started this project just last June. Over that time, Parmatech printed over 3,400 parts in 56 different designs. The very first samples went to Cobra in less than a week.

“If you were to tool that up, it would be a very intricate tool,” says Roach. “It would take a lot of time to make and you may find that you can’t even do it. Here you just change the CAD model, make sure the build parameters are okay, and then you print it.”

This is where things get really interesting.

A Whole New Fitting Ballgame

Just how big of a game-changer is 3D Metal Jet printing? Imagine having a set of clubs designed and manufactured just for you.

“Traditional manufacturing involves a large tooling expense to create many of the same part,” says Roach. “With Metal Jet, it’s possible to make each part unique without adding any expense.”

That’s a whole new level of custom fitting.

“Right now, we make thousands of identical clubheads, and then we to fit them to the golfer using the tools we have,” says Roach. “We adjust loft, lie, change shafts, move weight with a track or whatever. But with Metal Jet, we can give the fitter more freedom to help the golfer figure out what they need, and then make it for them.”

Say you and a buddy go in for a fitting. The fitter may find you need a lower CG more toward the toe while your buddy may need a higher CG in the center. You may want a thinner topline and need a tad more offset with a slightly thicker sole, while your buddy may need less offset and a thinner sole. That info can be turned into two separate CAD files, and your clubs can be custom printed just for you without any added cost to actually produce the head.

“There’s no tooling involved,” says Roach. “So you don’t have to worry about all that expense and time to build your club. We can fit down to a more granular level.”

“That’s looking at the future,” adds Yagley. “But we want to walk before we run. There are massive opportunities, but in the near term, we’re looking to make products that give you mechanical and physical properties you can’t get from conventional manufacturing techniques. That’s what we need to do first.”

This is next-level stuff compared to using Artificial Intelligence to design a driver face or an iron. While AI can simulate different designs in ways humans can’t, traditional manufacturing is still the limiting factor.

“AI software defines stuff like it has to be forgeable or it has to be castable,” explains Roach. “That puts limits on it so you can’t get to all the possibilities. But if you take those limits off, then you could design something even better.”

A Return to Domestic Manufacturing?

Since we’re talking about computers, printers, and a bunch of ones and zeroes, could Metal Jet technology bring manufacturing back to the U.S.?

“Yes,” says Yagley. “That’s not pie in the sky. It’s very possible. We’re doing it right now.”

That’s not to say there isn’t still a considerable amount of welding, grinding, buffing, and scoring (aka – handwork) that needs to happen before the parts become a golf club. The day a 3D Metal Jet printer will squirt out a nearly finished golf club head is still a long way off.

“Right now, we’re just talking about fabricating a chunk of metal,” Yagley says. “We can make this chunk of metal, but we need to turn it into a finished product. There’s still a lot of handwork going on. We’ll need to reinvent the process of converting that chunk of metal from what it is into a pretty golf club. There are people working on that.”

Metal Jet printing is an energy-intensive process. You literally have to melt metal powder in the printer itself in order to print out a part. Then that part needs to be put into an oven to bake out the polymer binding agents to turn it into a finished part. Production centers would need to be located where energy is relatively cheap and with easy access to a supply chain. And since Metal Jet printers can print anything, a company might make golf club parts one day, automotive parts another, and medical instruments another.

“Our parts need some post-processing,” adds Yagley. “So, either a current vendor sets up a metal printing shop and converts the printed parts into a finished head, or the parts will need to be shipped elsewhere for finishing. Either way, the process for making parts is changing, and is going to change a lot more in the next several years.”

A Business Sea Change

Raise your hand if you’re old enough to remember Ry Cooder. Rolling Stone magazine ranks Cooder eighth on its list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time. In 1979, Cooder released an album called Bop Till You Drop – the very first pop/rock album recorded using digital technology. It wasn’t long before all music was recorded digitally, and ultimately sold and consumed digitally as well.

This fall’s club from Cobra 3D Metal Jet printing is golf’s Bop Till You Drop.

And it’s going to change everything.

“As this technology matures, it’s going to get better and better and faster and faster,” says Roach. “Then you could have more on-demand production. Maybe we won’t have to carry three months’ worth of inventory in a warehouse somewhere.”

Since the process for design and manufacturing is the same, products can get to market faster and far less expensively. Tools for different prototypes and iterations won’t need to be made. “This production method gets the product launched faster,” says Roach. “No tooling is required, and the ability to mix part types within a build enables production flexibility.”

“There’s a business to doing golf,” adds Yagley. “If you’re making something overseas, you don’t want to air ship it here. It would be too expensive, so you put it on a boat. But if you put it on a boat, it may take two months before you see it. There’s a cost to that. There’s an opportunity cost, and a supply chain cost. Even if you paid a little more for the head to be made in the United States, you could have it faster, and there’s a value to that.

“It’s not just ‘how much does a head cost?’ It’s ‘how quickly can you get it? How quickly could you go from a fitting to here’s the head made just for you?’ If the consumer is willing to pay for that, then the whole business makes more sense.”

Near Term, Long Term

Long term, it’s easy to let your imagination run amuck with possibilities. Full set customization, complete design freedom, and end products that are lighter, more forgiving, higher launching, and better feeling make golfers all silly with excitement. But things like affordable domestic manufacturing, lower shipping costs, just-in-time manufacturing, and lower inventory costs make the business types do the Cha-Cha.

“We have concepts we think will make better products,” says Yagley. “If we do that, the businesspeople, the development people – they’ll get to work figuring a way to make more of them, make them less expensively and make them faster.”

I asked Yagley and Roach how long it would be before Cobra 3D Metal Jet printing becomes mainstream. Their replies were both cautious and optimistic.

“If mainstream means launching a product for sale that anyone could buy, well…” says Roach, with an eye towards this fall’s release. “Our expectation is it starts small and gradually increases in our lineup to some point down the road where it reaches critical mass. It’s a many year roadmap to get to that point.”

“As this progresses, you might see one-off things come out that might wind up in a Tour player’s bag,” adds Yagley. “We’re proving the technology and what better way to prove it out than with some of the best players in the world.”

If only Cobra had a guy on staff who’d geek out over something this advanced and be willing to try it.

Hell, he’d probably want to run the machine.

Details on this fall’s Cobra 3D Metal Jet printing project are strictly hush-hush. Based on the imagery provided, it’s pretty clear the new product will include plenty of intricate latticework. And an image from the joint HP-Cobra-Parmatech online presentation shows a latticed-out iron head, but Cobra isn’t talking. I even tried asking if the club or clubs they’re planning will go a long way or a short way.

“It depends on how far you can throw it,” replied Roach.

All the cool stuff – the domestic manufacturing, the custom fit manufactured clubs, all of it – is still down the road. But as with objects in the rearview mirror, the future might be closer than it would appear. Cobra admits it didn’t think it would reach this point as quickly as it did, so who knows?

“Our job is to make an innovative product that’s better in some aspect,” says Yagley. “It could be feel, it could be ball speed, it could be spin or forgiveness – something that makes it better.

“Then we’ll figure out how to make more of them. And a lot of them.”

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John Barba

John Barba

John Barba

John is an aging, yet avid golfer, writer, 6-point-something handicapper living back home in New England after a 22-year exile in Minnesota. He loves telling stories, writing about golf and golf travel, and enjoys classic golf equipment. “The only thing a golfer needs is more daylight.” - BenHogan

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      Gerald Teigrob

      4 years ago

      Having moved over to Cobra Golf for much of my set, I am one of those golf club junkies who sees the future very bright for Cobra! I am also hearing that with Bryson’s US Open win, he will be pushing the envelope with drivers…a 48 inch driver with some tweaking on the head. Should be interesting to see what he and Cobra comes up with!

      Reply

      Tidav

      4 years ago

      Morning fitting, clubs printed and ready in the afternoon… or even quicker.
      Might happen in the next 20 years, or even faster.

      Reply

      Willie T

      4 years ago

      Can you imagine Cobra printing up Bryson Dechambeau some 3D irons specific to his exacting standards….he will be hitting 400yard Pitching wedge shots. Seriously the technology is neat to see evolving. Will the average Joe golfer be able to have a set built at a reasonable cost? I really don’t think so. What will keep this technology in the upper edge of affordability will the fact that they won’t be made by the thousands but rather by the one by one’s as each is tweaked to a specific golfer.

      Reply

      Dave Bolt

      4 years ago

      This might become an opportunity for boutique builders to enter the market as well. I’m a guitar player. I can go to the local guitar shop and purchase a acoustic guitar off the rack from Martin or Taylor. They are fine guitars, many are built via CNC machines and hand assembled by a skilled worker. I can get a guitar custom built via their custom build shop and have more control over details such as finish, wood choice, etc. (Much like custom fit clubs), or I can go to a local luthier and have a completely customized product that is built by hand. The local luthier might sell 20-30 guitars a year that he builds in his shop, he cannot compete in volume with the big companies but he can provide much better customization and attention to detail. Acoustic guitars have a bracing pattern under the soundboard that is as variable as the internal design of today’s best clubs. And they are built using subtractive technology that is tuned by hand with planes and sanding. The luthier is going to get the best sound out of the wood because he can focus on the small details. Maybe we will have local club builders who can download a 3D model and tweak it to do the same down the road.

      Reply

      Carolyn

      4 years ago

      Like any club that works well for any specific pro, some kind of copy is going to be made available for us mortal players………Martin, Taylor..have you played a top line Zager yet…something easy to play…

      Reply

      Jay

      4 years ago

      Ah, Cobra, your innovation is showing. I truly love it when companies are able to find the next new frontier. Many of them don’t make it to the market, and that’s the risk of being an innovator, but if and when they do make it, the rest of the commercial industrial machine follows and we consumers benefit greatly for their willingness to evolve. I know there are a lot of cynics in this game, and if it was up to them we would still be hitting featheries with hand carved sticks down along the sheep pastures. I can only begin to imagine what this industrial innovation could do for our game, that is, if the technology can live up to and surpass our current standards and requirements for durability, design aesthetics and performance, and just as important, be affordable to us consumers. I mean, come on, we are playing our sport with some of the most sophisticated combinations of metals and polymers, carbon fibers and resins. From the sophisticated head engineering, to the incredibly well designed shafts and right down to the grips we choose, there are untold millions of man hours that produced these clubs we dare critique about feel, color, or badging. Can you imagine if it came down to printing up a club to our own bespoke specs for a trial fitting, then printing out the remaining set while enjoying lunch? Those data can be filed away, so that your next set could be readily produced by text or phone call and a single swipe of your credit card. I know that’s a little pie in the sky dreamy, but who would have guessed that this little device I’m typing on that fits in my pocket is actually what we would have called a super-computer only a few short decades ago.. Keep going Cobra, we’ve got a lot to gain from your explorations.

      Reply

      Annsguy

      4 years ago

      My first cell phone in the bag was way too expensive too but things come down in time. I am anxious to see where this leads us.. Frankly I dont get it but you cant live in a world of no innovation.

      Reply

      Barry

      4 years ago

      Have to hand it to Cobra to keep pushing the envelope. For a “smaller” company they seem to be doing a lot of things right.

      Reply

      Trip D

      4 years ago

      Custom fitting aside, the primary benefit to this technology would be bringing manufacturing back to the U.S., if indeed that occurs…..

      Reply

      Paul Barba

      4 years ago

      Nice article John. Can one of those 3D printers, print me up a short game?

      Reply

      JT

      4 years ago

      Back of the line buddy. Been looking to build that for a few decades. Let the old guys get the first crack on tech they can actually use.

      Reply

      [email protected]

      4 years ago

      It w/b foolish to discount the near-daily advances in technology. But you want to REALLY impress me…make me a really nice set of irons, comparable in every aspect to the current ones out there, for $400. And a similarly “equal” driver for $250. Then you’ll have my interest.

      And if you’re struggling to break 100, here’s a great tip…take lessons!. In the meantime, pick up your ball after you pass the “quad” point on any holes. No point in having all this high-tech stuff when you’re still plodding around a course & every other shot is a groundball or next-fairway-over slice. Sorry, I’m just venting my frustrations at the 5-hour rounds I’m starting to again experience now that tee times have returned to their normal intervals up here in the NE!

      Reply

      Murphy

      4 years ago

      Snob

      Reply

      Herb

      4 years ago

      Do we know the metal, width and flexibility yet. It is not like this metal is just sitting on a spindle waiting.

      Reply

      Chuck

      4 years ago

      3d printing will not yield the same quality as any of the other methods of manufacturing. I don’t care how they do it, and what they say, there’s no way it’ll be as strong as a forged, milled, or casting. I’m not a metallurgist but I know enough about a 3d printing to know that it kinda sucks in a lot of ways. Printing metal, especially metal that would need to hold up to some intense stresses, seems like a tall order. I don’t think it’s the end all be all this article makes it out to be.

      Reply

      Terry

      4 years ago

      It all sounds great but I agree that there will be problems, especially if you need to get these heads adjusted. In the early days of investment casting most heads could not be adjusted because they were liable to break due to the fragility of the metal. It took a few years to figure out that if the heads were treated with a chemical was, the grains in the metal would improve which made it possible to bend them, some up to 4 to 5 degrees. This was obviously an additional cost but the better companies did it so they were able to offer more custom making options. All the inexpensive models were not so treated and therefore not adjustable, but if you tried you often ended up with a broken head. It could be repaired and refinished but that was also expensive.

      This sounds great, but I would need to see much more info on the finished product before calling it the way of the future. Can it make heads with only stainless steel (if so, which ones) or can it also produce carbon steel heads (again which ones) and can it also add the chrome necessary to prevent rusting.

      Reply

      Jake

      4 years ago

      If you aren’t a specialist in metallurgy probably don’t make such widely inaccurate claims. Google support structure and MOI. Binder printing is not the same as fil 3d printing. It’s a level of manufacturing far beyond traditional. It’s quality is not the con, but access.

      Reply

      Domi

      4 years ago

      In older days, means 2-3 years ago, metal 3D printing already reached around 70% rigidity compared to “traditional” metal part producing methods. At this time, Daimler Trucks already started to supplz spare parts via 3D metal printing.
      My assumption is, they made a good progress towards maybe 80-90%until today, so, stiffness might be already good.

      Buckeye Doug

      4 years ago

      I guess PXG clubs aren’t expensive enough. Custom printed clubs could really take the fat out of your bank account. Unless of course this is just a story put out for click bait. Remember on the Big Bank Theory Tv show when Raj and Howard printed their own action figures for like $ 1,000 each. Now multiply by 14.

      Reply

      TR1PTIK

      4 years ago

      Are you really getting your “facts” from a sit-com??? 3D printing has been in use for a long time across a variety of industries – primarily for rapid prototyping – and as prices for both printers and materials continue to come down we will see 3D printing takeover and replace traditional manufacturing practices as mentioned in the article. An additional benefit not mentioned is that 3D printing also has the potential to reduce the physical footprint of manufacturing facilities which could also reduce operating costs across the board. There are many other factors to consider, but it is well within the realm of possibility for 3D printed club to eventually be quite affordable – or at the very least no more expensive than the clubs we play today.

      Reply

      AW

      4 years ago

      As TR1PTIK mentioned, the cost of 3DP materials has dropped dramatically in recent years. In fact, Volkswagen is already using HP’s Metal Jet to produce automotive parts because they are stronger and cheaper than traditional manufacturing.

      Reply

      John Barba

      4 years ago

      Not only Volkswagon, but the United States Marine Corp is also using the HP Metal Jet technology to fabricate spare parts in the field. They’re just scratching the surface of what’s possible, so it’s going to be fascinating to see what the future will bring.

      Kobas

      4 years ago

      I wonder if these gizmos can print $$$$…

      Reply

      Ron

      4 years ago

      How long before the rules boys at the USGA and R&A get their panties in a bind?

      Reply

      Darby

      4 years ago

      Retail custom fitters will have a field day with this. When the cost of the printers comes down, fitters can print the clubs on site!

      Reply

      Bob

      4 years ago

      I’m all for the new technology. If they can build a set of irons that specific to the player it will be a game changer. Those of us who have been fitted realize the differences it can make.

      Reply

      EasyPutter

      4 years ago

      This should prove to be an exciting leap forward in the design and production of clubs, granted milling and whatnot is needed still for the final finishing, but perhaps the imperfections inherent in the club face could be manipulated to provide benefit of ball flight and shot shape similar to the milled faces of modern putters. I am sure this is only the tip of the iceberg for 3D metal printing of golf equipment.

      Reply

      MGoBlue100

      4 years ago

      Next level stuff, JB. Pretty freaking cool, we’ll be watching to see where this goes…

      Reply

      RT

      4 years ago

      Crazy , too expensive !

      Reply

      Dan Corun

      4 years ago

      Old Tom Morris is turning over in his grave.

      Reply

      AW

      4 years ago

      No more than from the use of forged exotic metals, artificial intelligence, graphene-coated balls, etc…

      Reply

      DL

      4 years ago

      It doesn’t surprise me that Cobra is the first to be working on this, they always seem to be pushing the boundaries of tech in golf. I’m very curious to see where this evolves, it would be interesting to come back to this post in 15 years or so and see where we’ve gone. One thing I always think about recently is graphene and its tremendous properties for strength and weight. When is someone going to be trying to implement graphene in a driver?

      Reply

      David Silkroski

      4 years ago

      Check out Markforged on the web; I visit with them @CES 2020

      I’d take up “printing” custom putters :-)

      Make custom ‘Bullseye style”?

      Reply

      Andrew

      4 years ago

      I love it. The innovation of a smaller company is another reason to love Cobra.
      I wonder how long before Callaway or Taylor Made flex their financial muscles and hijack the technology for themselves now that the story is out?

      Reply

      Darrin

      4 years ago

      This could be a complete and total game changer. They need the same tech for shafts and grips as well.

      Reply

      WU

      4 years ago

      This will never happen in the US. It says it right there in the article –
      “Metal Jet printing is an energy-intensive process. You literally have to melt metal powder in the printer itself in order to print out a part. Then that part needs to be put into an oven to bake out the polymer binding agents to turn it into a finished part. Production centers would need to be located where energy is relatively cheap and with easy access to a supply chain. ”

      = POLLUTION. Nobody will want to pollute with more metal crap in the air or land in the Homeland.

      Reply

      Error In Your Logic

      4 years ago

      You must have read a different article. The article above mentions this is already happening in the US.

      Reply

      McaseyM

      4 years ago

      Very cool concept and ideas, will be excited to see what comes out this fall. I imagine the first few generations will be good works in progress kinda like ONE length and improve with each new iteration… and … if truly applicable across the bag… it could be said the one that Cobra CAN fit you best from Driver to wedges…. and if they ever want to jump back into the putter game.

      Reply

      Geoff Boyer

      4 years ago

      Running a custom 3d printing business in golf, I know how golfers (myself included) want equipment to be personalized. This could be a whole new level! Thanks for the article.

      Reply

      Vern Haynes

      4 years ago

      If they can get to speeding up production, then they really have something going. The biggest expense will be upfront and that will be the printers. I hope they find a way to make it work!

      Reply

      John Barba

      4 years ago

      Since a 3D Metal Jet printer can print anything – it’s conceivable a company could print golf club parts one week, automotive parts another week and medical instruments or whatever another week. Theoretically that’s how it might work and the cost would be amortized over many different parts and industries.

      Reply

      Rob

      4 years ago

      I loved Roach’s answer to you, abut “depends on how far you can throw it” sounds exactly a JB answer!

      Reply

      Steve S

      4 years ago

      Cool stuff. Prices will come down fast of this technology. I remember wanting to buy a 3-D printer for work to do prototyping in plastic. My AR was turned down because it was $75K. Now the same machine capability can be bought by hobbyists for about $3K.

      Reply

      Elson Correa

      4 years ago

      I was wondering who would be the first company to start looking into 3D printing for golf clubs.
      Cobra really surprised me by being the first one to announce that they are working with the technology.
      This technology has the potential to allow the manufacturer, make any club to the exact specifications and needs of a player. It will be interesting to know, how the PGA would regulate these clubs?

      Reply

      B.Boston

      4 years ago

      Wow, this is super cool stuff. Cobra could really has a massive impact on the future of club design if this new process works. It’s clear that they like to live on the high-tech edge of the game, I think they are the perfect company to try and make this work.

      Reply

      Nevin Wilson

      4 years ago

      If it brings more manufacturing back to the U.S., then I am in favor of it.

      Reply

      Stephen Pearcy

      4 years ago

      Certainly has potential. But a large, unanswered question – What kind of “metal”.? Anything comparable to what is used in today’s clubs?

      Reply

      John Barba

      4 years ago

      As mentioned, Cobra is keeping mum about the specifics. But 3D Metal Jet printing can print all kinds of metal – stainless steel, aluminum, nickel, cobalt-chrome, titanium alloys, copper alloys to name just a few.

      Reply

      Jon Walker

      4 years ago

      Stephen – 3D printing processes use powdered metals. The powder is either bound and sintered together (HP tech) and melted together via a laser welding process (EOS tech). As both of these technologies are new applications of existing production methods, many common materials are available. 316L, 17-4, Ti64, and Maraging Steel are examples of common 3DP materials and familiar to golfers

      Reply

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