Nassau To Stop Supplying Some Ball Companies
Golf Balls

Nassau To Stop Supplying Some Ball Companies

Nassau To Stop Supplying Some Ball Companies

According to an email obtained by MyGolfSpy, Nassau, the South Korean golf ball manufacturer recently purchased by TaylorMade, will produce only TaylorMade-branded products moving forward.

Fortunately for budget-minded golfers, there does appear to be at least one notable exception. Nassau’s largest and best-known client is the Massachusetts-based Snell Golf, owned and operated by Dean Snell. Snell is the former TaylorMade golf ball chief and a former Titleist engineer who helped develop the Pro V1. From what MyGolfSpy has been able to learn, supply-chain issues continue to impact Snell’s inventory but every indication is that the TaylorMade/Nassau facility will continue to supply Snell with golf balls.

The Nassau plant is one of the few facilities in the world capable of making cast urethane-covered golf balls. Before the acquisition, Nassau supplied TaylorMade with finished urethane and ionomer balls as well as cores and mantle layers for TP5 balls which are finished at TaylorMade’s South Carolina facility.

Of note, Nassau was also responsible for the original Kirkland Signature four-piece urethane ball in 2016.

Nassau golf ball plant

A Surprise Notice

In addition to Snell, Nassau also has produced balls for smaller direct-to-consumer brands and range-ball brands. It has also sold balls in Europe and Asia under its own brand name such as the Nassau Quattro.

It’s not known at this time whether Nassau/TaylorMade gave its larger customers advance notice of its decision. But we know of at least one company that learned via email that Nassau would no longer be providing them with golf balls. The message was received only after repeated attempts to reach its Nassau contacts.

As mentioned, Snell will continue to be supplied by Nassau. It appears TaylorMade’s decision will only impact its smaller DTC and possibly range-ball clients.

Nassau golf ball plant

TaylorMade responded to MyGolfSpy inquiries with this formal statement:

“With continued demand for TaylorMade golf balls, we have been working hard to increase global capacity and production. After having worked with Nassau Golf Co. Ltd in Korea for over 15 years and partnering with them to expand their capability in ionomer and, eventually, urethane golf balls, we decided to acquire Nassau Golf Co. Ltd in 2021. This enabled us to satisfy demand for our growing golf ball business and leverage our longstanding relationship with Nassau to increase future capacity and golf ball production.”

Nassau golf ball plant

TaylorMade Controlling Supply

In one sense, we might have seen this coming. TaylorMade’s ball business has grown 176 percent (according to Golf Datatech) over the past five years. While not directly addressing the question of non-TaylorMade customers, the statement indicates TaylorMade is bullish on its golf ball business. The company is clearly looking to take ownership of both its supply chain and means of production and to take care of its own business first and foremost. Dedicating its new factory to meeting demand for its own products is simply good business and common sense.

While many DTC ball suppliers can be vague about their ball sources, Snell has been upfront from the start. Dean Snell’s relationship with Nassau goes back at least 15 years. Snell was with TaylorMade at the time and that’s when the TaylorMade-Nassau relationship began. As mentioned, Nassau is one of only a handful of facilities in the world that makes cast urethane-covered golf balls.

“There aren’t many factories in the world that can do cast urethane,” Snell told MyGolf Spy in 2017. “Titleist has factories, TaylorMade has factories. There are a few overseas. It’s hard to do.”

While at Titleist in the ’90s, Snell developed the cast urethane process used for the original Pro V1. His name is among those listed on the first Pro V1 patent.

Small Brand Fallout

Nassau has kept its client list guarded and, as mentioned, smaller DTC brands have played coy about where they source their balls. The DTC brands affected by this decision are likely small brands you’ve never heard of. With the worldwide supply chain being what it is, many will have a hard, if not impossible, time finding a new supplier. A few will probably disappear.

In the big picture, these small brands are simply a logo and a story. They order balls off their supplier’s menu. On one hand, they won’t be missed if they go out of business. On the other hand, these are people who’ve created a business for themselves. Losing their supplier has placed them in an untenable position. We’ve learned that at least two other golf ball manufacturers are unable to take on new business from former Nassau customers at this time due to material and capacity limitations.

What is uncertain is whether TaylorMade’s decision is permanent. However, judging from what we’ve seen and heard, it would appear so.

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John Barba

John Barba

John Barba

John is an aging, yet avid golfer, writer, 6-point-something handicapper living back home in New England after a 22-year exile in Minnesota. He loves telling stories, writing about golf and golf travel, and enjoys classic golf equipment. “The only thing a golfer needs is more daylight.” - BenHogan

John Barba

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      Dama Dutcher

      2 years ago

      yada yada yada comments,lol.

      Nassau makes the 3 piece urethane Kirkland ball that is outselling almost every ball on the market considering it is sold by membership only. Any low handicapper (like me) knows the Kirkland ball is probably one of the best balls on the planet and 75% cheaper than the company that fired Scott Piercy. Shot a smooth 69 on Torrey North last month and I’m 65 from the 2nd tees. Taylormade knows every ball made for Kirkland is a direct threat against their ball sales.. End of story.
      Luckily I have a lifetime supply.

      Reply

      Carlos

      2 years ago

      Where are Inesis balls made?

      Reply

      OldCaddie

      2 years ago

      Been playing Snell the last four years. Great article.

      Reply

      RT

      2 years ago

      So it’s just” the big squeeze” control the supply you control price!!!!!!
      What about Wilson’s ? where are they made ?

      Reply

      Dama Dutcher

      2 years ago

      They know and see Kirkland urethane balls killing their sales so they are cutting them off..

      Reply

      Jim

      2 years ago

      Completely dedicated to the Snell balls, especially the MTB. So I’m really glad they won’t be affected by this TM buyout. Unlike Vice Snell actually designs the ball and Nassau produces it so it’s got all the technology that Dean developed during his Titliest and TM days and more. Glad to hear this news.

      Reply

      Ne

      2 years ago

      This is simple business folks. If you’re all wrapped around the axle over the fact that your favorite 50cent ball might not be available after this acquisition, just find another 50cent ball to launch into the woods/ water/ tall grass/ etc.
      This acquisition is more about the players who prefer to launch $4 balls into the woods/ water/ tall grass etc. There will always be inexpensive balls available, they may not have your favorite ink printed on them with a story on their website about how they’re just as good as a ProV1/ TP5, but the difference between one 50cent ball and another 50cent ball isn’t noticeable to the average weekend hacker.
      Good luck choosing your next 50cent pond missile.

      Reply

      Brian

      2 years ago

      This does not supise me since Taylormade is owned by a South Korean private equity firm it only makes sense for them to purchase the Korean company that makes some of the products that they sell. Since most equity firms purchase business’ for the purpose of making money, owning Nassau reduces production costs They could still private label balls for other people if that fits into their overall business plan. .

      Reply

      WYBob

      2 years ago

      I recall reading that Dean Snell was very much involved in the development of the 5 piece technology used in the TM Penta (precursor to the TP5). when he was still at TM. If his name is on any of the patents, I suspect TM will “play nice” with him regarding a continued manufacturing arrangement. Patents last 14-15 years, which means any patents of which he was part are still in effect. Plus. as a former TM executive, he probably still has some “friends” at TM that provides him a different level of access. That said, his ball business is not really large enough to be a threat to them. No sense poking a bear that doesn’t need to be poked.

      Reply

      James C

      2 years ago

      Could be, but more likely that Snell & Nassau have a contract that obligates Nassau to produce balls for Snell for a certain period of time. TM will honor that contract and if they determine they need the capacity at the end of the contract, they just won’t renew it.

      Reply

      Mike in Pittsburgh

      2 years ago

      First, we had a chip shortage. Then a global distribution problem. Then auto makers faced delays due to the chip and distribution problems. Now there is a ball squeeze!!!
      What’s the safe word??

      Reply

      Mark

      2 years ago

      Trust is the in-house golf ball brand of Kerichem Materials Science Co. Ltd., a Taiwan-based company that has supplied materials many of the major golf ball OEMs have used in their product for the last quarter-century.

      Reply

      Mark

      2 years ago

      Like some other, Trust has cracked the code on making urethane -covered, soft-feeling yet durable, high-spinning golf ball, but without sacrificing distance. However, Trust handle the entire golf ball making process IN HOUSE – design, materials, core and cover- we can make an affordable golf balls that rival the best in the world.. Who else do they make golf balls for?

      Reply

      Mark

      2 years ago

      Here is web site for a golf ball manufacture in Taiwan that makes the Trust Bison balls and balls for you if you want them https://www.kerichem.com/

      Marc

      1 year ago

      Trust balls are TPU (thermoplastic polyurethane). Way differed than cast urethane. And to get TPU to be close to as durable as cast, you have to some how crosslink the cover material. Some companies have figured it out, there are others who do not post treat the ball cover.

      David

      2 years ago

      I love these articles. Keep them coming.

      Actually, this is a common business practice in many industries, not just golf balls. I’m in Electronic Components, and it is similar.

      Reply

      Carolyn

      2 years ago

      What everyone is missing is the fact the balls made for others were being sold almost half the price of the like Taylormade balls……so if at half they were making ends meet (profit) how come Taylormade charges so much for their line of balls because they can and the more they push the little guy out the more profit they can make…..just remember every time you pay $50 for a dozen top line ball at least 40% of that is going to the PRO and the advertising of that ball telling you how good it is, well your making double bogeys with it.

      Reply

      Tim Caine

      2 years ago

      You know you are completely wrong? You know that, right? Callaway is a publicly held company so it’s financials are readily available. It spends very similarly to Taylormade. Plus, Taylormade was recently sold and so its financials for some years are also available. You can look up what they spend.
      I’ll keep it short. Either company spends about 20-24% of it’s total revenue on Sales and Administration costs. Which is pretty much EXACLTY the same as any other consumer goods company. Less than a quarter of that costs goes to paid endorsements, and about 1/4 goes to direct marketing.
      Which means a little less than 10% of what you pay for a dozen balls goes to any kind of marketing at all, including the Pros that use them. Not only that, but because they spend that money the gain huge market share gains. Which means economies of scale. Which actually brings the cost of golf balls DOWN.
      Lastly, Callaway and Taylormade spend more in R&D than the companies which feed off their old patents even bring in as revenue. When you buy a DTC ball, you are essentially buying “old” Callaway, Taylormade, or Titleist technology. The little companies “feed” off the work the big companies’ engineers do. That’s also the same in any other consumer goods industry.
      Finally, by way of comparison, Big beer companies spend close to 35% of their revenue on sales and administrations costs. The marketing arm of Big Beer companies is much much larger than big golf companies. I hear nobody complaining their beer is too expensive because of marketing.
      Just an FYI.

      Reply

      EWPRO

      2 years ago

      It’s good to hear the REAL facts and not fake news from the rough.

      Steve (the real one, pithy and insufferable)

      2 years ago

      Beer is too expensive due to marketing. I, for one, will no longer be subsidizing those young urban professionals and beach partiers who are sucking up all that sponsorship money.

      Chris

      2 years ago

      Yep, I’ve been waiting for those economies of scale to bring the cost of golf balls (and clubs) down for about 20 years now. Gonna happen any minute. But kudos on that big beer company analogy. Because, you know, they’re doing all that advertising as a public service, to let folks know about their superior product, and not because, if they didn’t, their loyal fan base would just grab the 30-pack of Natty Ice at the corner Shop’n’Go and never notice a difference.

      Jerry Wojenski

      2 years ago

      Dean Snell posted a video discussing the TM acquisition a week ago assuring customers this will not impact Snell golf balls, but the supply of chemicals to make urethene covers is still scarce.

      Reply

      Fred Krueger

      2 years ago

      Actually right to terminate clauses are often common in commercial contracts. If Nassau has been actively courting suitors, it’s possible that they included such clauses in contracts written during their search for a merge or buyout partner. Considering they operate one of the few golf ball manufacturing facilities in the world., they possibly were the dominant party in contract negotiations allowing them to add these clauses with little or no opposition from their customers.

      Reply

      James C

      2 years ago

      Change of control provisions are usually a one-way street giving the customer the option to leave if the supplier is sold but not vice versa. Even if it’s two-way, it would only give Nassau an out if Snell was sold.

      Reply

      Golfinnut

      2 years ago

      I don’t think Dean would sell even if given the opportunity. He’s already been with TM, which I think is the only reason why he wasn’t lost in this shuffle.

      Reply

      Robb

      2 years ago

      I always have a supply of a few hundred high end balls in the closet. THANK YOU HACKERS!!! Especially those scratch players who hit tons of ProV’s into the woods.

      Reply

      Moe

      2 years ago

      Who makes the Maxfli tour balls?

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      2 years ago

      Foremost.

      Reply

      John J

      2 years ago

      I have not ever noticed any ball shortages “on the shelf”. Especially, when it comes to TM’s balls, which I personally don’t really care for. While this personally will not affect me, it speaks volumes about TM’s direction. Eliminate the competition by securing your supply chain issues. This is great business sense, but whenever you eliminate competition you squash some level of innovation. Never really been impressed with anything that TM offers and now even less so.

      Reply

      Rob

      2 years ago

      No worries here. I always have a few hundred high end balls in the closet. THANK YOU HACKERS!!

      Reply

      TMAC

      2 years ago

      Similar to when they purchased Adams and then stopped offering their products. They use the slot technology that Adams developed and got rid of Adams.
      I wish TM would have copied Adams hybrid designs. I miss those Adams hybrids.

      Reply

      Max

      2 years ago

      Still Have an iDEA ProGold Boxer prototype in my bag. Or, Ol’ Reliable as I call it

      dp

      2 years ago

      Another thing to consider is the FOB shipping costs for TM. Shipping from S. Korea vs. S. Carolina is not comparable and will surely impact the retail cost.

      Reply

      KM

      2 years ago

      Of course the logistics cost will be affected to the price, but consider the other cost factors, like labor and infrastructure. S.Korea has skilled workers with low cost. So it should be even?

      Reply

      storm319

      2 years ago

      TM has been outsourcing the core/mantle assemblies from Nassau and more recently Foremost for years and then handling the cover assembly, stamping, and packaging in house in South Carolina so this is not a new development. If anything, they may be able to shift cover assembly to Nassau for the European and Asian markets and reduce a trip to the US.

      Reply

      Jay

      2 years ago

      You guys (commenters/cheap people) are too much, you want good jobs, or your neighbors, children, other relatives to have good jobs with good benefits, but you want your golf balls to be top notch and also cost $15.00 per dozen while being made in China, what a joke!

      Reply

      Duke

      2 years ago

      Yep! Sad but true! Made in America seems to be a thing in the past!

      Reply

      Theo

      2 years ago

      I seem to remember Golf Digest did a story on premium balls and at the time, all urethane Titleist, Callaway, Bridgestone and TaylorMade balls were made in the US.

      Reply

      CD Osborne

      2 years ago

      Where are Oncore balls made?

      Reply

      CD Osborne

      2 years ago

      Found answer in the review of Oncore by Mygolfspy. Oncore are made at Foremost.

      Reply

      Brian

      2 years ago

      It is well documented that Vice gets their balls from Foremost in Taiwan. From what I understand they’ve largely tied up the Foremost production and probably aren’t going anywhere (barring a major taking out Foremost). Any idea specifically which DTC brands are negatively impacted, John.

      Reply

      John Barba

      2 years ago

      Yes.

      Reply

      Nick

      2 years ago

      I see what you did there…

      luis

      2 years ago

      Not doubting that Vice gets (at least some) of their balls from Foremost, I’ve seen that written on this website I believe. A few months ago I played with a rep from Vice and he was telling me Vice Pro is most similar to a TP5 because they make them in the same factory. I didn’t ask where, I just assumed it was somewhere in the Orient. This made me think of Vice when the news broke of TM acquiring Nassau. Then again, he was a sales guy and could have just been making the Vice – TM comparison based on the TP5 ball I was playing.

      Reply

      MrHogan

      2 years ago

      Love the Snell ball. Good business move, TM looking to hurt the competition.

      Reply

      fred

      2 years ago

      all hail king Taylor Made…

      So TM is now the Amazon of Golf. Push out the little guys and more $ for yourself. Sad as those little guys in reality took little or none of the overall business from TM, and actually gave them a % as well. The excuse of supply shortages is just a temporary issue/excuse. It is “just business” but also “just greed” as well.

      next to go will be PXG, Sub70 and other club sellers who get their product from larger suppliers.

      Reply

      turd ferguson

      2 years ago

      They aren’t running a charity.

      Reply

      Tim Caine

      2 years ago

      Do you research, Pal. PXG is vertically integrated. Taylormade will have no affect on them other than to compete in an open marketplace. Plus, everyone gets mad at the big companies. What about getting mad at the little companies. You realize when you buy a DTC golf ball you nearly always buying “old” Taylormade, Titleist, or Callaway technology. Each year the big 3 spend twice the money in R&D than the “little guys” even bring in annually as revenue. You seem angry at the big guys for muscling out the little guys, what about getting mad at the little guys for essentially leaching off the big guys. The little guys would have to charge a lot more if they had to develop their own technology instead of just taking what ever the big guys cast off.

      Reply

      Joe

      2 years ago

      The large manufacturers are happy to recoup prior year R&D expenditures through patent extension to the smaller cap industry. This symbiotic relationship is beneficial to both parties. At the end of the day, the patent owner can dictate who, how, and what tech can be used….oh, and for what price.

      Chris

      2 years ago

      I would pay literally anything to get Don Parsons to stop screaming at me through my TV. But I would be sad to see Sub70 go…9

      Reply

      Doug

      2 years ago

      Joe, it’s Bob Parsons. You aren’t listening! I’m laughing because it’s SO annoying….it’s a race to be rid of it ASAP. I’d like to tell him Callaway rules, anyway. Seriously, PXG’s discounts for the military (not me) are awesome – on that point, good for him!

      Shawn

      2 years ago

      I would imagine that TaylorMade will have to continue making balls for whoever has a contract, you just can’t say sorry we’re done producing balls for you.

      Of course they may have not renewed contracts leading up tot he sale.

      Reply

      Fozcycle

      2 years ago

      Thanks JB, can you divulge what companies are at risk?

      Reply

      John Barba

      2 years ago

      Can you keep a secret?

      Reply

      john Smith

      2 years ago

      Seems like it is game over for the DTC market once Foremost is acquired by one of the big guys. Innovators such as On Core and others will fall to the wayside quickly. Unless manufacturing returns to the US in the very near future, the DTC market for golf balls will be a footnote in history. A flash in the pan that gained traction until they were squashed by larger firms consolidating to, and possibly beyond, monopoly regulations. This is a do or die moment for guys like Keith Blakeley ( On Core Chair) make it in a US plant or die by consolidation and the fickle loyalties of Taiwan and Chinese manufacturing plants as they align with Taylor, Titleist, and others. If Foremost aligns with a major in the near future there is no answer for DTC companies.

      Reply

      Mark

      2 years ago

      Another golf ball company We are not just a “brand name” printed on golf balls designed and manufactured by someone else. We control the end to end manufacturing of our balls from design and materials and from core to cover to ensure maximum performance and quality control. Trust golf balls…..

      Reply

      David West

      2 years ago

      Love all your stuff and what you are doing for golfers in general. A couple weeks ago I took a shot at MGS for what I perceived as “selling out”. My sincerest apologies. Keep up the great work!

      Reply

      Steve S

      2 years ago

      Not surprised that after all the supply chain issues that a smart company would want to “secure” their supply chain. For a guy like me, slow swinger(90mph) ball choices are easy. The MGS test for my driver swing speed showed the carry distance difference from no. 1 to no. 15 was 2 yards. Filter that with mid iron and wedge swings and I still have 10 choices for what I like. So look at those 10 and buy whatever is the cheapest.

      Reply

      Jay

      2 years ago

      If a guy like you can’t tell the difference between the #1 ball and the #15 ball, you should definitely buy the cheapest ball on the shelf regardless of brand, the best vs the worst wouldn’t matter, you can’t tell.

      Reply

      Rob

      2 years ago

      As mentioned by John, it only makes sense for TM to control the production to benefit it’slef. Itt owns the copany that su pplies one of it’s biggest products, and having focus solely on TM (and a bit of Snell) will probably reduce any chacne for supply shortage of it’s balls.

      Reply

      Greg

      2 years ago

      Vice may be in trouble

      Reply

      CoryO

      2 years ago

      They’ve been cagey for a while about who makes their balls, but it’s almost certainly still Foremost in Taiwan, so they should be fine (unless someone buys Foremost).

      Reply

      GilB

      2 years ago

      There’s got to be some other golf ball manufacturers out there that can retool to accommodate these small DTC etailers. Money can make retooling worth the effort but of course the DTC companies will pay more and consumers will pay more. But, if you’re a loyal consumer of the DTC companies it’ll still worth the increase when the big boy retailers/etailers are charging an arm and leg for their balls.

      Reply

      John Barba

      2 years ago

      For the most part, it’s not a matter of retooling. A lot of these small brands simply buy off a menu with a tweak here or there. It’s mostly right now a matter of capacity – pretty much anyone who makes golf balls on this here planet is either at or nearly at full capacity., not to mention current supply chain challenges.

      Reply

      Ray

      2 years ago

      It could take 100s of millions of dollars to build a new factory. Then one has to find and hire the personnel to run, design, train factory workers. TM says buy out your competition complete with factory and workers with near 0 interest rates. Marketing will take the place of innovation and competition. Nothing good about this is on the favor of the consumer.

      Reply

      Luis

      2 years ago

      Happy for Snell to be able to continue producing their excellent product line. I’m a customer that have only played their MTB-X for the last 3 years. Even switched from yellow to white due to the supply shortages. This are certainly good news.

      Reply

      chuck m

      2 years ago

      I have been purchasing a “C4” ball from master grip for a decade, it had become my primary winter ball. It shared the same specs as “ProV1” and had recd a message that they cannot offer this ball again. Seems to be a direct result of this Nassau acquisition.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      2 years ago

      Working to confirm, but I believe MG sourced the majority of its product from Launch Technologies. They make a fair amount of the B- and C-tier product for the OEMs. ERC Soft, Supersoft, some TaylorMade stuff, Mizuno range balls and plenty of DTC stuff as well.

      Not entirely sure if C4 was also launch tech.

      Neil Hockenberry

      2 years ago

      Where does Vice get their balls?

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      2 years ago

      The majority of Vice models are produced by Foremost. It’s likely the last remaining factory not controlled by a major OEM capable of making a cast urethane ball.

      Reply

      Bill

      2 years ago

      Vice is manufactured by foremost

      Reply

      Andrew Burrows

      2 years ago

      From their website it appears they manufacture their own balls in Germany, so I would presume this doesn’t impact them. That was my first concern too as Vice Pro and Pro + are cast urethane balls;

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      2 years ago

      Vice claims to “engineer” their balls in Germany. IMO, it’s a creative use of language. When I call the pizza place and tell them I want pepperoni and mushroom on my pie, did I just engineer a pizza?

      With the exception of the Pro Zero which is manufactured by Feng Tay (manufacturer of RZN balls as well as the factory that produces Mizuno’s RB Tour Line), Vice product is made by Foremost.

      vincent schiavo

      2 years ago

      Vice is the coyest of the coy…

      Reply

      CoryO

      2 years ago

      Almost certainly still Foremost in Taiwan.

      Reply

      Storm319

      2 years ago

      Vice models have been predominantly produced by Foremost in Taiwan (recent exception being the Vice Pro Zero that was released last year which is produced by Teng Fay in Vietnam due to lack of capacity at Foremost). I don’t think Vice has ever used Nassau.

      Reply

      Milo

      2 years ago

      I’m shocked! Shocked! Well, not that shocked.

      Reply

      JB

      2 years ago

      Your next post, TM acquires snell

      Reply

      Paulo

      2 years ago

      You know you might have just killed a huge deal there ….

      Reply

      Scooter McGavin

      2 years ago

      That depends on TM’s goal with acquiring Nassau. If it is as they say, purely for increasing capacity of TM ball production, I don’t see why they would buy Snell. Snell is just a customer of Nassau’s, and as a DTC, what assets do they actually have that TM would want?. They just buy balls from (now TM’s) factory, mark them up, and re-sell them.

      Reply

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