Is This the Best Iron Ever Created?
Irons

Is This the Best Iron Ever Created?

Is This the Best Iron Ever Created?

Written By: Tony Covey

PXG may not be a household name. If owner, Bob Parsons, has his way however; his PXG brand will soon be among the most desirable in all of golf.

Members of the MyGolfSpy team recently had the opportunity to visit with the PXG (Parsons Xtreme Golf) team at its Scottsdale Arizona headquarters. We’re excited to share the inside story of what’s happening at PXG, where the brand fits in the larger landscape of golf equipment, and most importantly, whether or not PXG’s first effort lives up to its premium billing.

The Man Behind the Brand

Bob Parsons is a golfer.

There are plenty of other adjectives too. Bob Parsons is a billionaire, philanthropist, and sometimes controversial figure, but as much as anything else, Bob Parsons is a golfer.

Inside the circles in which he travels his unrelenting passion for golf is the stuff of legend. He plays almost daily, and I’m told it’s anything but unusual for Parsons to seamlessly transition from the driving range to the golf course to an indoor hitting bay.

An imperfect golfing machine of sorts, Bob Parsons hits more golf balls than some tour pros.

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So take that information and push whatever else you might think about Parsons off to the side and believe this; when it comes to the love of the game and the equipment with which it’s played, Bob Parsons is one of us.

Bob Parsons is a rabid gearhead.

He might be the biggest gearhead I’ve ever met. Clubs, shafts, anything related to golf equipment; the man is obsessed. That obsession…the quest for the perfect set of golf clubs… is something I’m sure most of you can relate to. It’s the reason why Parsons’ PXG golf equipment company exists, and why it has the potential to make a substantial impact on the equipment landscape.

PXG: A True Startup

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While I like nice things as much as the next guy, I’m personally uncomfortable with opulence, and so given Bob Parsons’ reputation for taking everything he does to the extreme, I expected to be uncomfortable during my visit to PXG.

What I definitely wasn’t expecting was what we found, or perhaps more accurately, what we didn’t find at PXG world headquarters.

While the company will soon relocate to a permanent space, since its inception the entirety of the company’s current operations are run from inside two trailers on the property of Parsons’ Scottsdale National Golf Course. Don’t get me wrong, as trailers go, they’re nice, but a trailer on a fancy golf course is still a trailer.

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Parsons, it turns out, is not a frivolous man. The company’s employees sit at non-descript desks in a mostly open space. The team has every resource it needs at its disposal, but none a moment before it’s actually needed. There’s absolutely nothing opulent, or even upscale, about PXG’s base of operations. There is no excess.

Everyone on the PXG team works hard.

“To work here you better be able to carry your own weight and a backpack full of tungsten too” – Brad Schweigert, Managing Director, PXG

PXG, we learned, is not the hobby of a man with more money than sense. As much as PXG is a labor of love for Parsons, it’s also just another one of his business and he runs it as such. Like most every other business Bob Parsons has been a part of, he has every intention of PXG eventually turning a profit and creating opportunities for people in his community to succeed, but for now the company is focused on product not profit.

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“Early on it was about developing product. We had zero resources to try and sell anything because we weren’t trying to sell anything”. – Brad Schweigert, Managing Director, PXG

Sales can wait.

That’s an unconventional approach to the golf industry, but as you’ve probably figured out by now, Bob Parsons is an unconventional guy.

Screw Your Boxes

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Nearly every golf company talks about making the best performing clubs in golf.

Parsons Xtreme Golf is different.

Don’t misunderstand me. It’s not that PXG isn’t as intent as the next company on creating the best equipment in golf. It’s that PXG has both the means and the motive to strip away many of the barriers that stifle product innovation. Bob Parsons can do things others in the golf industry can’t.

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Golf equipment companies exist inside boxes within increasingly constrictive boxes.

The USGA is a box, but the more time you spend with engineers, the more you realize that it’s hardly the most restrictive.

Company philosophy is a box. Products have to look and perform a certain way. Whether the company line is forgiveness, distance, or the comfort and security of the middle, the status quo and the unrelenting pursuit of business as usual makes it difficult for real innovation to breathe.

Shareholder demands, budget constraints…those are boxes too; arguably the most restrictive of all.

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The unspoken reality is that when golf companies talk about creating the best performing products, what they’re actually talking about is creating the best performing products within a particular mindset and at a very specific price.

Contrary to what we’re often told, the next great thing seldom actually starts with performance. It almost always starts with a specific price point. In all but the rarest cases, the cost of innovation can’t exceed the MSRP of $999.

“One of the challenges they [other golf companies] have is that they’re trying to innovate to a budget and be all things to all people”. – Brad Schweigert, Managing Director, PXG

So let me say this again: Parsons Xtreme Golf is different. The PXG team has a blank check.

The company’s R&D department, which began with former Ping engineers Brad Schweigert and Mike Nicolette, was tasked with creating the best performing clubs in golf. Period.

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There was no pre-existing mold, no pre-determined philosophy, no target price, and no limitations on cost. The only real directive was to create an iron that looks like a blade, and would equal or exceed the forgiveness of the top game-improvement irons on the market today.

That’s obviously no easy task, and in talking with Schweigert and Nicolette I got the sense that working without constraints was initially a challenge in and of itself. For guys accustomed to working in boxes, it almost certainly takes time to wrap your head around what it means to create without limitations.

The result of their efforts is an initial product lineup unlike anything we’ve ever seen.

“As a full-line product release, it’s better than anything that’s ever been done before” – Brad Schweigert, Managing Director, PXG

The Origins of the Screws

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The first thing I should tell you is that the PXG team would prefer that we refer to the screws that adorn every product in its equipment catalog as weights.

While I’m probably not going to do that, the story behind the screws is actually fairly interesting.

During the early prototyping stages, PXG’s Managing Director, Brad Schweigert, was experimenting with different systems for swapping and arraigning weights. Initially he considered pressing tungsten directly into the soleplate of the metalwoods, but the process itself required additional tooling, and was time intensive.

PXG-13

So in the interest of flexibility and expediency, Schweigert came up with a system of interchangeable screws that would allow him to more easily experiment with moving different amounts of mass around the clubhead.

While they served their initial purpose, the screws were never intended to be part of the final design. Schweigert thought the screws looked cool, and the team, including Bob Parsons, felt they gave the clubs the distinctive look they wanted. The screws, which started as a means to accelerate the prototyping phase, soon became the signature of PXG’s inaugural lineup.

The Screws Are Functional

There are basically two things that people outside of PXG have suggested to us about the screw-based weighting system.

  • It’s purely ornamental
  • It’s overly complex

The first is patently inaccurate. The second is a bit more nuanced.

To be certain, the 16 distinct weights (as found in the driver) are probably 12 to 14 more weights than the average golfer is ready to manipulate on his own, which is why it’s important to point out that like Miura and other high-end offerings, the plan is for PXG’s equipment to be sold primarily as a custom fit offering.

Realistically, even more accomplished fitters (and the tinkering consumer) will focus on basic settings…mass forward, mass rearward, toe-weighted, and heel-weighted. Obviously with all those weights there’s room for fine tuning, but the takeaway should be that the PXG weighting system is only as complex as you want it to be.

A Question of Headweight

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Where PXG’s weighting system really shines, according to Brad Schweigert, is its unique ability to tune headweight. With most other adjustable mass systems, weight is moved in large chunks. By moving a large number of smaller weights, PXG’s system not only has the capabilities to spread mass over a larger  area and improve inertia, the system’s real strength is that it offers the ability to easily adjust head and swing weight.

With PXG’s system you can easily add or remove weight from the head without the permanence of hot melt or rat glue. Not only are weight changes non-permanent, but the PXG system was designed such that swapping tungsten weights for titanium (or vice versa) results in a change of exactly 1 swing weight point.

That’s hardly complex at all. It’s actually kind of brilliant.

PXG: The Secret Sauce

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While the elaborate system of screws will certainly be what golfers notice, the most impressive bits of PXG’s technology are hidden beneath the surface of the 0311 irons.

While one could reasonably describe the 0311 as a wide-bodied blade, hidden in the traditional looking design (screws notwithstanding) is what PXG will tell you is the most advanced iron design ever created.

0311 construction starts with a forged open face body. An ultra-thin face is plasma welded to the body, creating a hollow cavity which is then filled with a thermoplastic elastomer. The elastomer, a flexible goo of sorts, supports the face while enhancing feel. A bonding adhesive keeps gaps from forming between the elastomer and the face.

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While that may not sound like much of a radical departure from the types of technology stories told by every other golf company, PXG’s technology is groundbreaking, in part, because it allows for a face that’s half as thick as anything else on the market today. Half as thick. Nobody is even close. From a performance perspective, that’s a tremendous leap forward.

As you might expect, the weight screws provide perimeter weighting for additional forgiveness while allowing for precise swing weighting.

To throw around standard industry terms, the totality of the design translates to more distance, more forgiveness, and because of the elastomer, better feel too.

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The 0311 plays like a game-improvement iron but looks similar to a blade. The footprint is comparable to TaylorMade’s RSi2, but with cleaner lines and a more traditional, perhaps even timeless look (again, screws not withstanding).

PXG owns several patents that cover the design and manufacturing processes. The company’s hope is that it will be 20 years before anyone else can do anything similar.

PXG: It Costs More to Make

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PXG’s material costs are high. The manufacturing process is complex, and the company believes it has the tightest tolerances in the golf industry. All of that raises production costs, and we haven’t begun to account for the added expense that comes from all those screws.

A stock shaft lineup that includes Fujikura’s Pro series and Aldila’s Rogue in the woods, and KBS and Nippon in the irons doesn’t do much to lower costs either.

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You may not like the price (I don’t like it), but with PXG you are paying for actual technology.  Callaway, TaylorMade, Titleist…take your pick; they’re not going to invest the kind of money it takes to develop an iron like the 0311 because their typical consumer won’t accept a $2400 price tag for a set of eight irons.

“It costs more. The technology that we’re using, and the way that we’re doing it, at least right now, it costs more”. – Brad Schweigert, Managing Director, PXG

PXG: Price List

PXG: A Performance Brand

So given the expense, you might be inclined to view PXG as a lifestyle or image brand. That’s not how it sees itself. PXG won’t be telling any tales of magic, fairy-dusted steel or offering platinum inlays in its diamond-encrusted irons. PXG is first and foremost a performance brand. It lists its primary competitors as TaylorMade, Callaway, and Titleist, not Miura, Epon, or Honma.

“The guys we’re fitting onto our products have Callaway, TaylorMade, and Titleist in their bags.” – Mike Nicolette, Director, PXG

That said, Bob Parsons has every intent of building a performance brand with a luxury image. That last piece only happens when you sell for above average prices. The product must be desirable. It has to retain its value too, so don’t expect to see PXG churning out new product like TaylorMade and Callaway, and definitely don’t expect prices to be slashed six months after release.

Unfortunately the pricing structure probably puts the 0311 iron out of reach for the average consumer, and that’s a shame because I believe the 0311 is the most significant iron to come along in years. It’s the total package.

PXG-11

The 0317 hybrid is almost equally as impressive. Mike Nicolette, who is responsible for many popular PING designs going back to Karsten’s time, told me it’s the best thing he’s ever created.

Like most hybrids it won’t get top billing, but it’s among the best, if not the best I’ve seen within the category.

The 0811 Driver and 0341 Fairway woods are at least competitive with anything else, and while I would agree with those who say the weight system is complex, I’d also argue its virtues. Both are very good (Schweigert, who supervised the team responsible for the #1 Selling PING G30 calls it his best work ever), but so are lots of other drivers and fairway woods for literally half the price.

To an extent, the jury is still out on this one, although there may prove to be a compelling accuracy story here that doesn’t come at the expense of distance.

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The 0311 wedges are a safe, middle-of-the-road offering, with the potential to be a lot more interesting if the lineup expands to include additional bounce and grind options. For now, they look and feel great, they’re extremely forgiving, and as you would expect, blend seamlessly with the 0311 irons.

The putters offer a distinctively PXG look and come in a variety of shapes. They’ll look good in a bag full of PXG equipment, but this is unquestionably the spot in the bag where I have the most trouble trying to justify the price. Then again, if Cameron and Bettinardi can get $350+, what’s another $50?

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As the technology evolves and manufacturing costs drop, the door is open for retail prices to fall too, but don’t expect PXG to ever enter the true mainstream. The products cost literally twice as much as mainstream alternatives, and while some of that is driven by the true costs of manufacturing, I also believe it’s exactly where Bob Parsons wants to position his PXG brand.

PXG: The Future

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With the first round of product development complete and an actual product line on the market, PXG can start looking towards the next phase.

The PXG lineup is already available at Cool Clubs locations nationwide, and you can expect its dealer network to grow rapidly.

There’s a bit of a hiring frenzy taking place as the company has grown from just a handful to 20 employees in a very short period of time. Parsons is bringing in top talent from both inside and outside of the golf industry to help grow and streamline the operation.

Marketing and PR are beginning to ramp up, and while I haven’t been told anything specifically, I suspect there’s going to be a concerted effort to make sure golfers know the PXG name. The initial ads we saw…the ones that won’t make it to print… paint a picture of a brand intent on making some noise.

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PXG isn’t going to sit quietly and wait to be discovered, it’s going to promote itself in ways that other high-end golf equipment brands don’t. While PXG doesn’t harbor any short-term delusions of outselling the biggest names in golf, I believe it wants to occupy a similar position within the minds of golfers.

PXG. Hear it enough times and you’ll remember it.

The plan is to grow the size of the PGA Tour Staff to 4-6 members, including names inside the Top 50. This too is an unconventional approach for a high-end brand, but PXG believes…actually PXG knows that tour validation is an important piece of the retail equation. Even those who can afford to spend more on their golf clubs want proof that their clubs are suitable for play at the highest level.

While the consumer perception may be luxury, PXG’s reality is performance.

It’s a safe bet additional products will be added to the lineup in the coming months.

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As for sales projections…I asked Bob Parsons how many sets of irons he expected to sell the first year.

“Twelve-hundred”, he said.

“Twelve-hundred?” I asked (probably looking a bit puzzled).

Parsons shook his head, laughed and said “Not twelve-hundred, twelve-thousand. I’m not good with small numbers”.

That, as much as anything else, should tell you everything you need to know about how Parsons plans to operate PXG.

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You don’t spend what PXG has spent or bring in the kind of talent PXG has hired if success will measured in small numbers. No part of the PXG plan involves becoming just another boutique golf brand. Bob Parsons is a big numbers kind of guy.

While success for PXG might seem an unlikely proposition given what most of us are accustomed to paying for golf equipment, Parsons is resolute in his belief that he can grow a golf brand. He believes golf clubs, even premium ones, are a relatively easy sell, and clearly he believes the timing is right for a new company with a different approach to enter the golf equipment marketplace.

Bob Parsons is a disruptive force and he’s brought his brand of disruptive energy – his employees would say contagious energy – to the golf industry, and you better believe he plans on making an impact far beyond an initial twelve-thousand sets.

For more information on the PXG product line, visit PXG.com

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Loparch

      8 years ago

      I bought the 10 iron set. 4 iron through 58 degree wedge composite shafts.
      Two eagles in 10 days with clubs. Shot two – 1 over par rounds and a 2 over par round in the first two weeks of ownership of clubs.
      I am a 10.1 index and a bad putter.
      Love the clubs. The wedges are unbelievable!

      Reply

      par404

      8 years ago

      Not that innovative. Cleveland had a similar concept with their successful TA Series, especially the TA7.

      Reply

      BEN POMPA

      8 years ago

      CORRECTION TO MY RECENT EMAIL:ZERO TORQ IRON SHAFT.

      Reply

      BEN POMPA

      8 years ago

      SEND ME A #5 IRON HEAD AND I WILL INSTALL MY ZERO IRON SHAFT WHICH I GUARANTEE WILL MAKE THE CLUB TRULY EXTREME.JUST TELL ME THE DESIRED LENGTH AND SWING WEIGHT YOU DESIRE AND I WILL COMPLETE THE CLUB,TEST IT AND SEND IT BACK TO YOU FOR YOUR OWN TESTS AND COMMENTS.MY ADDRESS IS:BEN POMPA,105 GENEVA STREET,APT.2010,BATH,NY,14810.

      Reply

      Vern Boenish

      8 years ago

      I have a vacation planned to Scottsdale in May, and intend to visit Cool Clubs to see them. If, and this is a big “if”, I hit them better than anything else they put in my hands, I will buy them. I’m a 2 hdcp and have hit blades (Hogan & Mizuno) for years, but it’s time to try some “friendlier” irons. Truth is, as much time and money as I spend at golf now, it would be well worth it to me if I hit them better. It will take me awhile to hide the the money from my wife, but I’ll do it!

      Reply

      Henry

      8 years ago

      OK I read all I can find on the PXG clubs, but I can’t find out where they are manufactured?

      Reply

      AP LYNAM

      8 years ago

      At Scottsdale National Golf Club in Arizona. Bob Parsons owns this private golf course. PXG is located on the grounds in very high end trailers.

      Reply

      BEN POMPA

      8 years ago

      I FEEL THAT THE GOLF SHAFT IS JUST AS IMPORTANT AS THE CLUB HEAD TO ACHIEVE BEST PERFORMANCE.I HAVE DEVELOPED A 100% STEEL IRON SHAFT WITH CLOSE TO ZERO TORQUE THAT IS DEFINITELY EXTREME.IN SPITE OF ITS LACK OF TORQUE,IT IS LOW SHOCK AND LOW WEIGHT AND CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY PLAYED BY GOLFERS FROM SENIORS TO TOUR PROS.FEEL,CONTROL,DISTANCE ARE ALL THERE. BEING THE ORIGINATOR OF THE 2 PIECE COMPOSITE AND GRAPHITE GOLF SHAFT, COPIED BY TRUE TEMPER,I HAVE PROVEN CREDENTIALS.I WOULD LOVE TO TRY THE COMBINATION OF THE PXG HEAD WITH MY ZERO TORQUE SHAFT.

      Reply

      Lucy Summers

      9 years ago

      I want to point out a very obvious design flaw.
      The multitude of screws on these clubs. Each screw head is going to be like a little vacuum cleaner that sucks up grass and mud. Even with the irons (where the screws are on the reverse), muck is going to get captured. One Phil-flop from soft gunk will cram them full.
      I guarantee that you are going to see caddies with toothpicks and jackknives surreptiously digging the gunk off these things.
      And, as for all of the considerations of precision weighting, a cubic inch of grass and mud impacted in all of these screw head cavities is going to absolutely nullify any pitch about precision weighting.
      I see this as fatal. Mark my words. The players will gripe about and the design will be changed to kill the screws. Leaving us with what exactly?

      Reply

      Lucy Summers

      9 years ago

      What better way to truly evaluate the claims for PXG superiority than to watch and see what happens to elite users after their switch.

      At the end of the day, we want to know: did the driver produce more distance, did the driver lead to greater accuracy, did the irons lead to more GIRs, and did the putter produce better Strokes Gained. These are all fairly included in the claims being made, so let’s see what happens in the real world.

      Here are the 6 PXG users, with performance data for 2015-2014 (pre-PXG) courtesy of PGA Tour.
      Driving Distance/Fairways%/GIR%/SGP:
      Ryan Moore: 282-284/70-69/65-67/.164-.038
      Billy Horschel: 295-291/63/67/69-70/.231-.226
      Chris KIrk: 285-291/61-62/64-63/.066-.373
      Zach Johnson: 282-282/71-70/68-67/.042-.106
      Charles Howell: 302-304/52-52/68-67/-.217-.034
      James Hahn: 295-289/59-60/66-63/.060- -.306

      An ecology check for all these players around the time of the US Open in 2016 will give us a good indication of the performance superiority of PXG equipment.

      Reply

      J-Full

      8 years ago

      Looks like all of the players are performing slightly worse this year (through the US Open) but I don’t think the numbers are significantly different than last year. They’re within a standard deviation of last year’s numbers. But if the players believe the clubs will help them play better then that’s all that matters I guess. I wish your comment had their money list standings at the time of your comment. That would be a good measure of performance since the switch because no player will care if their fairway percentages are down a few points if they’re finishing much better.

      Bob Pegram

      8 years ago

      What is SGP?

      Tom Weatherill

      8 years ago

      Lucy, you are full of poop. I play the 0311’s and I have yet to get any crap in the screws, in fact if I did, there is something seriously wrong with my swing. These irons are everything they claim them to be. Best 2400 I’ve ever spent. Go pound sand.

      Reply

      Keith Martin

      7 years ago

      I concur…getting mud or something else in the screws is NOT a problem. Unless you swing the club backwards don’t know how that would even come into play. Most solid clubs I’ve ever played. Part of the PXG solution is having very well qualified fitters and this is why you’ll never walk into a retail golf shop and walk out with off the shelf PXG’s.

      JLow

      9 years ago

      I am particular to the feeling especially in the putting green. Imaging when you putting on green from speed of 5 to 10.5 , I am sure you will have big range of feeling and it deteriorates your confident level. After tried out PXG Brandon, it work well for me. The put through and the ball rolling line really superb(in the hole again and again).. I am confident to reduce my HC from 7 to 4 or even 3 and that for sure.

      Reply

      Jack Wullkotte

      9 years ago

      Tony,

      I see that Ricky Barnes is now playing Wilson clubs. What happened?

      Jack

      Reply

      Leith Anderson

      9 years ago

      Did this thread really end on June 1? Is everyone just worn out?

      Reply

      Tim

      9 years ago

      Played a set this past weekend.

      I’m a 10 HDCP.
      I’ve been fitted at both of the top iron companies.

      Out of the box demo set. By Far the best irons I’ve ever played. At any price.
      Killer feel , 1 club longer than my new Callaways that were fitted.
      Trying to find out how to buy them now. Well worth the money.

      Reply

      Bill Catron

      9 years ago

      Remember in comparing club distances check the difference in the lofts, i.e. i believe I saw that these clubs had 27 deg. for the 6 iron while some clubs like Mizuno their 6 iron is either 30 or 31 deg. That can acount for a 1 club difference in itself.

      Reply

      rob campbell

      9 years ago

      Can’t imagine what you guys are thinking, “too expensive.” You all buy, as you say, $500 drivers every few years that are nearly identical. Oh, wait, that one is white. I’m dying to hit these irons, hope I can buy 5 through PW. I’d gap out the rest of the wedges from my existing set. Time to take out the XL anyway.
      No, I’m not going to polish and paint screw heads on my old ones.

      Reply

      David D

      9 years ago

      spent the day yesterday on the course with an ex professional athlete that is a 6 handicap and a PGA pro (14 time pga winner and 6 time champions winner). He athlete is playing the PXG clubs and loves them (he paid for them so he is not biased). he said he gets – 10 extra yards from his irons, and was crushing his drives. The sound off the club was spectacular. At one point the pro spent 5 minutes looking at the clubs and was very impressed. I think he would have liked to hit them bot was playing in a tournament and could not.
      They are expensive and not priced for everyone. However, if you take the game serious and have the means to buy them, it is worth looking at them. Now I have to convince my wife

      Reply

      Jay

      8 years ago

      He’s a 6 hadicap with that resume? HMMMM!

      Reply

      Max King

      9 years ago

      So wait, let me get this straight…No cost or goal with PXG is unrealistic, but early on they found injecting tungsten into the sole was too time intensive? Time intensive? What happened to the no limitations goal of this company? If the designers wanted to accomplish something shouldn’t there be no barriers in the way of their goal? Additional tooling? I thought this was a blank check operation….I’m confused.

      Reply

      JV

      9 years ago

      I’m glad someone else noticed this too. Why not go all out and build a $10k set of clubs, if that’s what it takes to make the best, since you’re selling these to people who don’t ask about the price.

      Reply

      Montana

      9 years ago

      It made prototyping too time intensive, not production.

      Reply

      JV

      9 years ago

      Having read through the article a few times and most of the comments, it seems like MSG has greatly missed the mark on this one. My observations…

      1) Tone. Both articles on PXG seem as much, if not more, hype marketing as independent commentary. The responses to comments also come across as “we don’t care what you think” which is fine to a point, but tends to offend people that are truly just taking the time to offer feedback and call you out for veering off course.

      2) Target Audience. I’m sure these will sell to certain folks, much like Honma and Miura, but why so much coverage and hype over clubs that the vast majority of your readers can’t or won’t buy? If I remember correctly, you didn’t include exotic brands from Japan in your Most Wanted Driver test, so why all the front page headlines here?

      3) Lack of data. Isn’t your tagline #DATACRATIC? Yes, I read your comment that not everything is a review, but when it’s not a review, it comes across as just plain marketing hype, and more importantly, hypocritical. You’ve trained your readers to question when people tell them that they’re great clubs, without the data to support it, and yet that’s all you offer here. And why have a +HCP golfer test the clubs, when you make it clear they’re designed for GI technology?

      So, maybe they’re the best clubs ever, even though you’ve already admitted that the Mizunos felt better, but I think you’ve missed the mark with your coverage of PXG and don’t seem to be doing a good job of absorbing feedback, even if you don’t agree with it.

      Reply

      Steven

      9 years ago

      I couldn’t agree more.

      Reply

      DB

      9 years ago

      Ron, you don’t have to buy them. Much like you don’t have to buy a Ferrari with an unjustifiable price-tag. In saying that, irregardless of performance, they aren’t a good looking golf club. They’re as ugly as Callaway’s new Mack Daddy wedges.

      Reply

      Kneed Gripps

      9 years ago

      So there is no other bounce degree option? 12 degrees. I am currently enjoying a lower degree bounce with my wedges

      Reply

      ron

      9 years ago

      2400 fr set of irons is a sickening joke , no irons are even worth half that why because their filled with frigin goo and weight changing screws WHAT A FARCE THE EQUIPMENT INDUSTRY IS TURNING OUT TO BE. If any moron buys these they are suckers. You need talent to hit a ball and no club will make it easier. I dont see Rocco or Ryan winning anything lately with em and Im sure their getting good money to play em, 700 fr a driver this Parsons guy sounds like an ego maniac, and I cant wait to see him go under.

      Reply

      1432fpchero

      9 years ago

      get back on your meds. if you care to do any serious research on good custom made equipment you’ll find a few pioneers who made great stuff. Tom Wishon has a dearth of knowledge in this regard but the smartest man in golf who has now passed is Dr Eric Cook.

      http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/ottawacitizen/obituary.aspx?pid=170415496

      http://surestix.com/Moment_of_Inertia.html

      He was a class guy and really smart. so much so that while he was educating clubmakers and manufacturers about how golf cluns work that Ping sent someone around behind him to convince people that clubs don’t flex. There are a couple of tour wins attributed to his skills, and thanks to him i paid the mortgage off on my home as a PGA section player.

      the purpose of all of this. the last set of clubs he built for me were $3000.00 bucks in 1991, and worth every penny.

      Reply

      Jim

      8 years ago

      I felt same way but I got to hit these irons yesterday. I couldn’t believe the feel n the perfect flight. I have tried many different types of irons but something’s different about these clubs.

      Reply

      Mark

      9 years ago

      Assuming the driver conforms to USGA limits, restrictive as they are, then how could it possibly be longer than any other driver that is already scraping against those same limits? M.O.I. higher than others, no way. C.O.R. higher than others, no way so what, a few screws in the sole does it? No way.

      Reply

      COGolfer

      9 years ago

      Don’t worry, it isn’t better. They’re the Ed Hardy of golf clubs. People will definitely purchase, but they aren’t even close to be ing worth it.

      Reply

      Westhubbard

      9 years ago

      Couldn’t disagree more. I got a full bag fitting yesterday at Club Champion in Chicago. Tried more iron and shaft combinations than you could imagine, and the PXG irons came out on top by 10 yards over the next best combo (Titleist). I’m a 4 handicap and 10 more yards? The spin rate was perfect. The price…EXTREME. No doubt. I’m as skeptical as the next person about hype, but I can’t argue with the data and the results.

      Kevin Clayton

      8 years ago

      West Hubbard,

      Would you mind if I ask you some additional questions on these? I have been to CC in willowbrook a few times and am interested in testing these out, but since they are expensive, want to make sure it’s worth it.

      Jericho

      9 years ago

      Because I have the 1957 Limited Miura Baby blades im not really against any company and their decision on their price points ..but with Miura they have a clawing their way 60 year history of blood sweat an tears heartbreak an turmoil in forging metal to shape in to instruments then found their way into the hands of players who in time won Chapionships.. a great story ..Mr Parsons made his money through tech now wants to build golf clubs..they might and probably are very nice equipment but at this point I’d rather give that $3,000 to Butch

      Reply

      Jericho

      9 years ago

      It doesn’t mean I wouldn’t take these babies out for a spin’er two

      Reply

      Mike

      9 years ago

      Well done Tony, I enjoyed the article and your comments just as much! Looking forward to all the head to head testing to come! I wish PXG the best! Thanks again and very well written in my opinion..

      Reply

      oliversax

      9 years ago

      I’m definitely intrigued by the efforts put into the design. I don’t mind paying for the best, usually never disappointed if they deliver.

      However, these irons need to have interchangeable shafts. At this price point, that’s not a lot to ask.

      Can you pull some strings to make this happen, Tony? LOL.

      And thanks for the well written article and erudite responses.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      Filed under “You never know…” to help streamline the fitting system, the PXG team developed a proprietary shaft adapter for their irons. It likely was never intended to be part of the retail makeup, but the intriguing thing about what PXG did is that it’s completely weight neutral. Absolutely equivalent to a bonded combo.

      Reply

      joro

      9 years ago

      Now I don’t care who you are, that is funny. Thanks for the laugh

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      While not exactly to the extent that Mr. OnSense has listed, the ads that didn’t make the final cut weren’t that far removed from this type of tongue in cheek, embracing the obvious approach.

      Kidding aside, I’m really interested to see how the marketing manifests itself. As I said, companies who charge a premium for their golf products don’t generally take what I suppose is the traditional, or at least most common path for marketing products.

      The early indications are that PXG will operate like a mainstream golf company, even if the products aren’t.

      Reply

      ComeOnSense

      9 years ago

      I can see the Commercial War between Club companies already…

      ” Don’t Loft-Up, but Screw -Up”
      or
      ” If you Screwed-up by not Lofting-Up, then Speed-Up”
      or
      ” If you Speed-up by Screwing-up then you should Loft-Up”
      or
      “We have the Clubs to match your Screwed-Up swing”

      Reply

      Bob

      9 years ago

      Sorry – At $300 an iron – They are not in the market – No one in there right mind would pay that price for a set of irons – and talk about ugly. They better have a rethink on this one.

      Reply

      Alex

      9 years ago

      look at brands like Honma, Maruman or Williams golf. All of which don’t perform all that well and are priced far higher than these irons PXG are selling.
      I can tell you from experience that there are large numbers of people who use these “boutique” club brands and who have the money to afford them.
      To say “no one in their right mind would pay that price” is totally inaccurate.
      Although most people (myself included) cannot realistically afford them, that does not mean that there isn’t a market for them.

      Reply

      RON

      9 years ago

      Tony he may be self made but he was certainly blessed and very lucky to born with brains that smart to accomplish all that, something not many people are lucky enough to be born with. Im not saying that he dont deserve to live the good life absolutely he does and others like him, god bless him but to charge the public that kind of money fr material items like golf clubs is not necessary. If he is able to invent a great club like that then why cant the average golfer enjoy em to and not just the rich.

      Reply

      RON

      9 years ago

      Tony Covey if he gave that much to charity I would have to see it to beleive it and if he did it was for tax write offs , certainly not from the bottom of his heart, and because of that he wouldnt loose that much down the road. Maybe he is a nice guy so why only make clubs to cater to the rich, think about that one and no clubs cost that much to make or design to justify over 300 an iron, I dont know what he has been smoking but sure could use a hit from that good stuff. 700 fr a driver, give me a break.

      Reply

      Lt Nordberg

      8 years ago

      You do understand how charitable donations work as tax deductions, right? Last year I gave over $5,000 to charity. This does not mean that my tax liability was reduced by $5,000. The $5,000 was deducted from my Adjusted Gross Income (along with other dedcutions) to determine my taxable income. In short, charitable donations reduce taxes by an amount equal to your percentage tax (bracket) multiplied by the total donations.

      To say that someone gives a million dollars for the tax write off makes no sense. If they are in a 35% tax bracket, they will pay $350,000 less in taxes BUT the other $650,000 is gone. Why would you pay $1MM to get $350,000?

      Reply

      Steven

      9 years ago

      A few more thoughts.
      — I don’t find the clubs attractive. They remind me of a cartoon I saw years ago, perhaps by Jack Ziegler, with a man in a suit that had multiple cuffs up his pant legs up to the middle of his shins. The caption was something like “Cuff Crazy.” I think that these clubs are screw crazy in the same vein.
      — It sounds like the way the irons are constructed is the real story and that the screws are a bit of a gimmick. Couldn’t good irons be made with the same process without the screws.
      — Where is the love for the new Ben Hogan Ft. Worth irons? From the previous pieces I had read I thought that they were going to be the bee’s knees. I like the Ben Hogan approach to gapping better than what PXG has done. Couldn’t people with different swing speeds and ball trajectories profit from different lofts between clubs. Why have such an expensive set of irons with so many screw adjustments that only have one option for lofts?

      Reply

      1432fpchero

      9 years ago

      Steven, lets preface this reply with the statement that “Hogan equipment was consistently the best on the market for decades” their idea of their loft catalog is unique and will turn out to be expensive and could be their undoing. I sure hope not. I think i know how they are accomplishing having 40+ different heads in inventory and then not getting stuck with 347 31degree 6 irons.

      While all this “technology” gets poured into heads, its still the shaft that makes the club go whoosh. Golf has improved but still has a long way to go to get the shaft match issue solved

      Reply

      Fred

      9 years ago

      Interestingly enough, SMU’s Bryson Dechambeau, winner of this year’s NCAA Division 1 individual golf title, has apparently discarded the numbered iron concept in favor of using clubs with the degree of loft on them. His clubs are made by Edel. Meanwhile, sales have been pretty good at Hogan.

      bart casiello

      9 years ago

      Hi All,

      For years we have all complained there is no innovation from any of the major players. Now along comes an upstart that tells its designers make a better club with no restrictions. We should be applauding their efforts, not criticizing them.

      Before this article I thought PXG was going to be all smoke and mirrors. But I trust the information from Mygolfspy. Over the past 4 years I have purchased many products they have reviewed and I have never been disappointed. So combine trusted designers from Ping, hands on testing with Tony and PXG has my attention.

      The best news of all is the irons are available for lefties!! and next month the woods will be too!!

      Before I buy another club I will try PXG, I might not be able to afford it but Fathers Day, my anniversary, Christmas and my birthday are just around the corner.

      Reply

      NevinW

      9 years ago

      I have no doubt that these will sell. I see exotic cars all the time in my area of LV. The same people who buy Ferrari’s and Lamborghini’s will be willing to try these clubs. They have the money and like something exotic and different. I’ve already seen a set of these in a bag at my golf course ( might have been Ryan Moore’s?). The clubs look really better in person. If the technology is really valid costs will go down and more people will try them. These days, you can’t throw a rock with hitting a Tesla in my neighborhood. I remember hearing that nobody was going to spend that kind of money for an electric car.

      Reply

      Jack Wullkotte

      9 years ago

      I’ve been wrong before, believe it or not. I write nothing in stone. I’m 85 years old, so I hope the proof of the pudding is forthcoming within the next 20 yeas.

      Reply

      Jack Wullkotte

      9 years ago

      Just another gimmicky set of golf clubs, for the person with lots of money to toy with. Can you imagine a 25 handicapper trying to adjust those screws to get optimum performance? Even the touring pros don’t mess with the adjustments. They go to the guys in the trailers that follow the tour each week and use their personnel and equipment to get the proper launch angle, spin etc., etc. Golf companies with the greatest innovations ever incorporated into a golf club, come and go. I have been making golf clubs for 68 years, and among the many I have worked with are Ben Hogan, Byron Nelson, Jimmy Demaret, Jack Nicklaus, Greg Norman, Paul Azinger, Larry Mize, Dottie Pepper, Louise Suggs, Ben Crenshaw and many many more. Each one had that unique asset, called TALENT. I would be willing to bet that you will never see someone win a PGA Tour tournament with a set of PXG golf clubs. Sorry Mr. Parsons, but that;s reality. Jack Wullkotte

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      Jack -To each his own for sure, but do you mind if I file your email address away. We can talk when PXG notches its first Tour win. There’s not a doubt in my mind that it’s going to happen.

      Reply

      Rod

      8 years ago

      Give Scott, Bubba, Rory or Spieth a set of PXG and you’ll get a victory for the brand on the PGA Tour…

      joro

      9 years ago

      Jack, good comment and my sentiments exactly, But then again us old club makers maybe don’t know much. I was the wood maker at Cobra in the old days and made a couple of Drivers for Jack thru Phil Rodgers. I never met you but always respected what you did. It is good to hear you comment, and yes, the Tour Guys don’t spend a lot of time adjusting.
      John Rogers

      Reply

      Alex

      9 years ago

      You make good points Jack, and its true that equipment will never override the talent of a player.

      However to say that they are “gimmicky” is probably unfair. It’s been shown that changing swing weights and even weight orientation does have an effect on ball flight and club performance. If it was truly a gimmick it shouldn’t have a real effect on the performance of the irons.

      As for your point on players tinkering with them. It is stated in the article that they didnt intend for the player to move the weights themselves and that sets would primarily be sold after a full fitting. The manufacturer would orient the weights according to the fitting and the player wouldn’t move them unless they went to get their fitting checked some time down the line and were told to do so.

      Reply

      Tom Weatherill

      8 years ago

      Jack, the screws in the irons are NOT adjustable. They’re there to provide weight.

      Reply

      Jim

      9 years ago

      Sorry, but it’s a nice story about the manufacturing and design but the bottom line is the clubs are the ugliest things I’ve ever seen. And they cost more than I can believe. This company won’t last very long as no one will be able to buy them (and even if they did they’d get sick just looking at them). How can former Ping designers come up with something that bad?

      Reply

      Nardu

      9 years ago

      I don’t want to sound negative about the brand as I think the intention is great and puts the club performance before profit and coolness, BUT when do we see what the clubs actually do?
      At this point MyGolfSpy is gushing at the whole thing as though it is the best thing ever, but there aren’t any stats – and that flies directly in the face of what this website is said to stand for
      PLEASE test the clubs and judge them fairly, like you do with all the other brands of golf

      Reply

      Rob

      9 years ago

      If anyone remembers, another company tried a strategy like this where price was no option, Liquidmetal Golf. I remember those drivers, irons and putters were insanely expensive for the time and supposed to be revolutionary in performance. Maybe they had production problems or something else that caused them to fold but I don’t remember seeing too many sets around at the local course.

      Reply

      Dave B.

      9 years ago

      You are dreaming if you think golfers will pay these prices. Plus, the clubs look ugly. Looks like someone with a power drill fetish went crazy.

      Reply

      Rob

      9 years ago

      I’ve heard next to nothing about the driver and fairway woods. The quote in the article states, “The 0811 Driver and 0341 Fairway woods are at least competitive with anything else.” That sentence doesn’t inspire me to spend double all of a sudden.

      What are they doing in the driver to make it cost almost twice what an excellent current driver costs if it just competes with what’s out there? How do you justify that cost if it isn’t “revolutionary” as you’re claiming the irons are? Moving a 2 gram tungsten weight from the heel or toe isn’t going to produce any noticeable change in performance. If you move 5-6 of the weights then that may make a difference but how is that drastically different than what everyone else has done for a decade with their moveable weights?

      Can you step away from the irons and talk about the driver and fairway woods and maybe show a cut out of what’s going on inside of them? Almost anyone now can offer handpicking/measuring of a driver so tolerances don’t really come into play as part of the argument either.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      Rob – Yeah, I did focus on the irons because very early on in talking to the PXG team and hitting the entire lineup, it became clear that the irons were the story.

      I’ll be spending more time with the metalwoods in the coming weeks as I spent the bulk of my time with clubs just getting fit. And obviously even if our swings never changed from one day to the next, it’s tough to really gauge relative performance on a course you’ve never played. Basically, I hit what looked like good balls, and felt like good balls, but I can’t say for sure they were, from a distance perspective, good balls.

      You’re right…the 2 gram thing is limited, unless – as discussed in the article – you approach it from a swing weight perspective, then it becomes compelling. That said, I think the functionality comes in moving weight in larger chunks. Basic settings…draw, face, front CG, back CG, and perhaps a perimeter balanced…regardless, you’re moving lots of screws to get there.

      The interesting thing for me was to compare the metalwoods to the premium landscape. We see lots of high-end (high-priced) companies make a good iron (particularly in a traditional forging), but the metalwoods sound and play like afterthoughts. They just don’t stack up at any price. Here we’re talking about one of the top metalwood designers in the industry creating a product line without restriction. While it doesn’t in an of itself come close to justifying a $700 price tag, the fact that the woods are competitive with the best on the market today, is a point of differentiation between PXG and other premium brands.

      On the launch monitor the PXG driver did outperform the club in our plus handicap’s bag (both custom fit), but that’s a limited sample, and you can’t eliminate value from the conversation. How much is an additional 3, 5, 10 whatever yards worth? The answer lies with whoever is spending the money.

      We haven’t done a big hybrid test, but with the concession that I haven’t hit absolutely every hybrid on the market in 2015, I will say that PXG’s is unquestionably the best I’ve hit. They’ve done some things visually that probably suit my eye, but anecdotally, while we were out on the range listening to feedback from other guys in for fittings, the hybrid was generating nearly as much chatter as the irons.

      You say that nearly everyone offers handpicking, but that’s not really the case. Fitters do handpicking, and small manufacturers do handpicking that help you work within tolerances, but for the average off-the-rack guy (admittedly not the PXG customer) tolerances would offer more benefit.

      Nearly everyone will do custom swing weighting, but the way it’s done is permanent. PXG uses the example of switching to a shaft with a higher balance point. That changes swing weight. Would you rather make a permanent change, or swap a screw knowing you can always go back and retain the same feel. It’s a small thing for sure, but it’s real.

      Ultimately things cost what they cost, and the consumer decides the value.

      Reply

      Chris C.

      9 years ago

      Thank you Tony for your response. As you indicated, the insert is indeed a Nitronic insert. Would you agree that Mizuno’s MP-H5 irons share many of the Parsons’ attributes? I may have missed it but are all of the Parsons’ irons and wedges hollow bodied and polymer filled?

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      Similar starting point with the H5. The Mizuno is bulkier at address, and I don’t believe the cavity is TPE injection molded.

      The irons (3-PW) are hollow cavity injection molded TPE. The wedges are a traditional forging. They’ve done some interesting work to promote spin on shorter shots, but so says everyone else, and frankly we haven’t spent the time with the PXG wedges on the monitor to see if that’s real.

      Reply

      RON

      9 years ago

      Hey Parsons why dont you take a very small portion of yr billions and help people in this world who have nothing , not even clean water or food and change their lives forever and do some good fr man kind instead of making 2400 dollar frigin golf irons fr spoiled rich tight asses in this F up world we live in, after all yr blessed to have the ability to make such a great change fr people. Typical rich useless scum in this world.

      Reply

      Jack Wullkotte

      9 years ago

      Why don’t you tell us how you really feel?

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      Ron – You should probably do just the tiniest bit of research before you post drivel like this.

      I think it’s fair to say that what each of us does with the money we earn is our own business. Now would probably be the time to mention that Bob Parsons is entirely self-made. Marine vet, turned software developer, built Go Daddy, and several other business. Point being he’s earned every cent, he’s not some trust fund kid all grown up.

      What have you done? Did you spend less on your last car and donate that money to charity? Did you forgo a few country club dinners and put the money you would have spent to the greater good? What’s the cutoff? How much money does one have to have before charity becomes a mandate?

      I ask because if you did just the most basic of Google searches you’d discover that foundation that Bob and his wife have donated more than 80 million dollars to charitable causes over the last few years. That same google search would reveal that the Parsons family has signed on to the giving pledge (a promise to donate half of their wealth to charity). That’s before we talk about job creation, and countless other stories of Bob Parsons’ generosity that aren’t mine to tell.

      Point being, once again you don’t have even your most basic facts in order. I get the desire to throw rocks at rich guys who do nothing with their money but roll around in it, but if that’s what you’re looking to do, Parsons isn’t your guy.

      Reply

      andrew

      9 years ago

      no one- not any one of us- is “self made”. period.

      AD

      9 years ago

      Interesting. If this hits I could see the major manufacturers scrambling to develope something that provides similar results. With PXGs patents on the technology and processes that pads ol’ Bob’s pocket too.

      Reply

      golfercraig

      9 years ago

      I love all the comments from guys saying they’d never buy it, but are on their 5th driver in 5 years. Hypocrisy abounds.

      Reply

      Marty Neighbour

      9 years ago

      I was actually just talking about something similar last round. I had to make fun of myself, after I pointed out the fact that my friend was using a $400 putter, which I thought was crazy. Until I grabbed my $500 driver that I use 5 times a round. And I use my putter 30+ (many + there) times a round. Stupid brain.

      Reply

      T-Shot

      9 years ago

      Mizuno. Period. PXG is the Ugliest looking stuff I have ever seen. Who gives a shit about screws. How about fixing the 5 hour round of golf and lower the green fees?

      But seriously, Floyd Mayweather will probably by them for all his homies.

      Reply

      JohnB

      9 years ago

      Are there 12,000 people in this world who’d pony up the dough for a set of these irons? Absolutely! Just because I can’t afford them surely doesn’t mean that others can’t. There’s a value to status, innovation and being outside the mainstream to some buyers, and they can spend their money any way they want.

      The market for these clubs are the guys who find $5,000 in their couch cushions and will pay the price because they want to – most likely the guys with Parsons-like money.

      Reply

      Alex

      9 years ago

      This is a great point John. Everyone seems to be turning their noses up at these clubs because they are priced out of most peoples (mine included) price range. However those who read the entire article should have read that these were clubs created to simply find what is possible without restricting the designer on price on market placement.

      There is most definitely a market for these irons and are a number of people who can afford to purchase them.

      Although there are many, I would use Honma (in North America) as an example. These irons are priced much higher than PXG’s and yet there are still numerous people who buy and use them. As someone who’s hit Honma irons before, I can say they are far from special from a performance stand-point. Therefore if the PXG offering really does perform the way MGS say, which I don’t doubt, it should be much easier to justify buying PXG’s for those who can afford them.

      Reply

      ComeOnSense

      9 years ago

      I hope Taylormade comes out with these irons version for $399. Per set, and called them “ScrewThem2” with a patented “DunkyDonuts Cream Filled Technology”

      Reply

      Bob

      9 years ago

      It certainly is not my favourite – its ugly and not traditional and I would not use it whatsoever. I’m a real traditionalist – So I would not purchase it.

      Reply

      Marty Neighbour

      9 years ago

      Ahh, so you still use hickory clubs and a feathery ball? I commend your dedication to the traditional game.

      Reply

      Andy W

      9 years ago

      Can’t believe I am hearing the argument that these clubs are too expensive, won’t be buying ever. Nonsense. Same thing was said in the late 90s when Callaway came out with the titanium GBB when $500 for a driver was insane. The GBB’s rebound feature performed for those who could swing over 100mph, which included all Pros, and that was enough for all of us golfers to buy.

      Same will happen if the PXG irons perform, period!

      Reply

      Chris C.

      9 years ago

      Regardless of whether or not Parsons’ clubs amount to more than expensive toys for the wealthy, I look forward to reading an in depth review addressing their actual measured performance. In the meantime, I do have some questions. A quick perusal of the applicable patent suggests that the open faced forging is stainless steel. Is that correct? Are the forgings from China? Perhaps from the same facility producing Wishon’s designs? The insert appears to be something called “Nutronic Stainless Steel”. Is this product proprietary to Parsons or have others used/could use the same insert? Are you aware of the thickness of other steel inserts in use? The patent suggests that their irons be at least 50% filled with goop. Is it a given that more goop results in a better iron? Finally, you opined that Parsons’ material and manufacturing costs partially accounts for their price. Pray tell us, what exotic materials are being used and what unique forging process has been applied in the manufacturing of these clubs? Thank you for your efforts.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      I have the sense that you’re being smug, but I’ll bite.

      Yes, we are aware of face thicknesses from other OEM. Most share the info, and we’re often provided with cutaways to showoff the internal bits. PXG’s is visibly thinner and that alone is impressive considering gains are measured in 10th of millimeters.

      Are you sure you didn’t read Nitronic and not Nutronic? Nitronic steel is not proprietary, but it does cost more that conventional stainless steels because of its strength and other properties. PXG consulted with a metals expert (if memory serves it was a guy from the University of Georgia) to help them find a materiel that would allow them to do what they wanted to do. They did the same to find the right bonding agent.

      So yes..there is a specific materials cost associated with the steel that’s above average. It’s not magic steel, but it is a more expensive product. There’s also a materials cost associated with both the TPE used in the cavity as well as the injection molding process that puts it there. The bonding agent also adds to the cost as does the plasma welding. On a comparative basis, it’s a labor-intensive iron.

      What we didn’t mention is that in addition to being forged the cavity is also milled (you can see the milling marks in our die photos). That’s another step in the process, and with each additional step comes increased costs.

      Finally, PXG’s tighter tolerances also cost more. To get below industry standards increases costs substantially beyond what the average consumer is willing to stomach. That’s not a PXG story, that’s from me asking a handful of R&D guys why their tolerances aren’t tighter. Everything costs money and the consumer isn’t interested in absorbing them over a few grams and half a degree.

      Reply

      joro

      9 years ago

      Tony, I have read quite a few of your answers and respect most of your replies, but in this one you appear like a part owner or salesman. This may not be and I am not trying to sound like an ass but all this is copared to Tour stuff which the average Golfer has no business playing, so what is left appears to be an ego satisfying status symbol for the guy with the money and no game.

      Just an opinion. I wish them well but it is a hard road they are climbing against Engulf and Devour.

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      Joro – We’re talking reality here. The product costs more to make. Period. Now whether or not that rises to the level of $300 per club is another thing, but it’s not an iron you can make money selling for $899 a set – at least not yet.

      Another consideration, while it wasn’t said explicitly, my between the lines read is that the pricing structure allows for higher margins for retail partners. Guys are struggling on the standard 30%, if PXG offers better returns, retailers will push it, and that will help to move product.

      As I said in the article, there’s absolutely an element of market position at play. Bob wants a premium offering, and while I think he has it on performance, much of what’s interpreted is premium has a pricing aspect to it. It’s not premium if everyone can have it.

      I’m not sure what you mean when you say compared to tour stuff? Absolutely there will be an ego piece here, but I’m all but certain PXG will outperform all of them. Even the high-end guys who do irons well-enough struggle mightily with metalwoods.

      As for whether or not they’ll succeed. Bob Parsons is extremely confident. He’s currently succeeding in other business where he believes it’s harder to make money than it is in golf. Of course, he certainly wouldn’t be the first to take on golf and come up short, but that said, the guy’s track record is solid and the guys he’s hired…not just the golf guys, but the operations and logistics types know what they’re doing.

      I’m not sure he’ll conquer the industry – I’m fairly certain he doesn’t want to – but anyone who thinks PXG will be gone in 2 years should probably do some research.

      joro

      9 years ago

      Tony, thx for the answer. I always talk reality and the reality of it is Bob may have the absolute best GI club ever made but, without the marketing it won’t go. Maybe to a limited field for awhile, but the pricing, WOW, and I do know what it takes to make a club.

      I wish him well, I really do but I have seen “the best club” come and go several times in my years and engulf and devour always wins in the end. I guess maybe over the years I have seen too much, lol. But one thing is for sure, a Golf Club is only as good as the guy hitting it.

      Take care and keep up the good work

      Mike S

      9 years ago

      doesn’t matter if the retailers get a 60% margin or how hard they push it. The average golfer can’t afford it. (and that’s who most retailers sell to) And like a few folks have said, “even if I could afford it, I can’t justify spending that much on a set of clubs.” So that leaves elite golfers and the rich and senseless. Neither of which buy at your local Golf Smith. Also as others have said I’m having a hard time with the performance in the hands of the average golfer being better enough to justify the ridiculous cost. This will be a great line for Bob and his rich buddies, doesn’t matter if he makes money he can afford to pay for his “ego stroking.”

      Jeremy Thee

      9 years ago

      700 for a Driver, 500 for a Fairway wood? don’t even get me started on the 300-350 per Iron. I hear the complaint all the time that Golf is too expensive and too intimidating to play. Not that PXG would be solely responsible for keeping people from picking up the game or continuing to play it but the prices of the PXG clubs are ridiculous. There is not a club out there, no matter what they do to it that is going to completely fix or mask a poor swing. The truth will always come out in the wash. Too many Golfers believe that if Clubs are advertised as “Game changers” or “The most forgiving” and those clubs are combined with a price tag like PXG clubs are, then people really believe that equipment fixes everything that is wrong with your game. I have friends that buy new Drivers every 8 months or so and they always do it because of the new technology. They still slice, they still hook and there handicaps are still high. People will buy these clubs because as everyone knows if it’s expensive then you know it’s good.

      Reply

      Jonny B

      9 years ago

      MGS – Awesome insider’s look into PXG – the most mysterious and interesting golf equipment company on the planet today. Really great stuff. Thanks.

      I love love love what PXG is doing. It’s a whole new category that’s really hard to define right now, but it’s important to remember that this is only the beginning. I like that the engineers had the backing ($$) to just go and design and trial and error the best equipment they could. Really cool way to start a business and one that tends to breed success when you look at startups in general in any industry.

      Can’t wait to see this stuff making its way into the tour ranks. I wonder if PXG is being discussed in the board rooms of the Callaways, Titleists, and Taylormades of the industry, and if so… what is the discussion? I would think the major players are still in a “sit and wait and see” holding pattern, but are probably a bit nervous about PXG and what they’re doing. Especially if in the next 1-2 years you see the costs going down.

      Personally – too expensive for me at this point. But would love to try some of the PXG clubs out and compare to other top offerings.

      Reply

      Hairy Vardon

      9 years ago

      I’ve seen most things in my 21 years in the golf club industry, and it is apparent that there is some good technology in this product. I am, however reminded of the old adage that: The best way to make a million dollars in the golf industry, is to start with two million.

      Reply

      James Thompson

      9 years ago

      Anyone remember the Nickent Arc Blades? They were a hollow blade design like this, filled with polymer and were supposed to be forgiving. Apart from the screws they look like the same technology.
      James

      Reply

      gumby

      9 years ago

      I got a headache reading about and looking at these clubs. Hi tech run amok,screw it

      Reply

      Regis

      9 years ago

      I’m a 50 year club junkie. That being said, I have the same questions I had when the first series on Mr. Parson’s clubs surfaced months ago. Some have been answered. Like it obvious now that these have to be privately fitted ( or calibrated as the case may be) at a trained dealer/fitter. How does Mr. Parsons propose to bring in the flock?. Every attempt to get avid golfers properly fitted over the last 20 years has fallen flat. I’m a firm believer, (I did spring for custom fit Miura’s at one time) but I am in a very distinct minority. Secondly, my guess is that a large component of his target market is the avid private club golfer. My experience has been that this group is the last to embrace anything unconventional. They were certainly the last bastion to accept metal woods (although rumors of witch burning have been greatly exaggerated) and I don’t see too many club members being the first to show up at the annual member-member with a bag full of these. Again, I’d have no problem but I was also first on the tee with animal head covers. So I guess my fundamental question remains. Who’s their target golfer?

      Reply

      RookieBlue7

      9 years ago

      Yes, I’m viewing on my phone. That image didn’t load on it. I do see it on a PC though.

      Reply

      GreenDoor

      9 years ago

      I am one who has spent his fair share of dollars club-hopping, but in time, I have slowly grown wiser to the shtick of advertisers (thanks in part to sites such as MGS). I finally understand how the value of a good lesson or even a good fitting is so much higher than any temporary value I might find playing the club-of-the-week lottery. So long story long here is that I really would have to see quite a significant gain in performance across a broad spectrum of meaningful parameters before I would jump on this bandwagon.

      Where does the law of diminishing returns come into play with these clubs? For example, the value of the Cobra Fly-Z + driver is high (for me) because you are essentially buying two drivers for the price of one. As my game comes and goes, that driver will adjust with me and is so much more likely to stay in the bag for a long while. I feel I got my money’s worth for this innovation. If that level of innovation can be quantified here, then you will earn my attention, but so far, the jury is still out.

      Reply

      Steven

      9 years ago

      Even if the irons were the best that have ever been made, and even if I had the money, I couldn’t justify spending that much on them. I hope the company does well, but they will have to make it without my buying their products. I just hope that other manufacturers don’t decide that they can now raise their prices and still be below PXG.

      “Unfortunately the pricing structure probably puts the 0311 iron out of reach for the average consumer, and that’s a shame because I believe the 0311 is the most significant iron to come along in years. It’s the total package.” Where is the data? Without it this sounds like a marketing piece.

      Reply

      Brad Smith

      9 years ago

      This comment is on the article, not on the clubs. Contrary to the history of MyGolfSpy, this article said literally nothing about how the clubs actually play in comparison to X, Y and Z. Was there even a mention of you having hit them? I see in one of your answers above that you mention actually having hit them and compared them to several other brands. But that should have been in the article instead of paragraphs about the spartan trailers the design team sits in or instead of descriptions of the military’s MOS designations. I’m afraid this article can be described as …..really innovative design = really expensive, blah, blah, blah, blah, and blah.

      Come on, guys, as you’ve said many, many times, it’s not about the blah, blah, blah. It is about how they PERFORM.
      Brad

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      Brad – I’ve said this countless times…not everything is a review. This isn’t that.

      That said, we actually went out of our way to compare the 0311 to other irons currently available. Specifically we brought in a local +HCP golfer to hit the 0311 against the TaylorMade RSi1, TaylorMade RSi2, Mizuno JPX-850 Forged, Mizuno CB-501, and PING i25 (we brought the clubs with us). Rather than ask him just to hit balls straight (he did some of that), we asked him to compare shots across the whole of the face (specifically asking for toe and heel shots). On the short end the PXG was 4 yards longer than the RSi1 and 14 yards longer than the CB-501. Again, we’re talking about different irons, different specs, and so we spent a lot of time focusing on feel and relative distance loss on mishits. Apples to apples is tough with irons, it’s tougher still when you’re reaching across categories to try and find where something fits. The 0311 is unique in that I think you could probably slot it anywhere between a true blade and super game improvement and still get favorable results on a comparative basis.

      Again, the best numbers of the 6 clubs we tested were produced by the PXG offering, although we’d give the clear feel edge to Mizuno. Based on what we saw on the monitor and the feedback from not only our guys, but others on site, I believe that average players would see even more benefit from the PXG 0311.

      Not everything makes it into the article (boss likes these under 4000 words), and so I didn’t talk in any specific terms about my experience with them on the course in Arizona. Never mind that I shot one of my best 9 holes of the season (on a course I’d never played, with unfamiliar clubs), but the real story was in the impact marks on the face. It’s obviously anecdotal, but frankly I’ve never gotten more out of bad (in some cases total crap) swings.

      We get plenty of comments about not being able to buy a better game, but over time that’s exactly what’s happened, right? Anybody think Titanium isn’t better than persimmon? Anybody think it’s a break-even proposition to move from what’s in your bag now to a Wilson iron from the 60s? Breakthrough products exists. There are line-in-the-sand clubs that change things moving forward. The 0311 has that potential (although it probably won’t be fully realized until somebody else finds away to translate the technology for the masses). The rest of the line is just really good, which is what you’d expect from a mainstream company, and what you seldom get from boutique or luxury brands.

      People need to understand that innovation has a cost, and most golf companies won’t pay for it, because you can’t recoup it at $899 for irons or $399 for the driver (especially in a 1yr release cycle). Incidentally, this isn’t a PXG story…this is an industry story. I’ve heard it several other places…”we looked at doing this…” or “originally we had designed it like this…” those sentences always end with “but it cost too much to manufacture”.

      There are no ‘buts’ at PXG.

      It’s expensive, arguably plenty overpriced for the average consumer, but it’s really good. And quite frankly, I wasn’t expecting that. As a complete lineup, there is no weakness, and few can say that and have it be true. For whatever reason some readers apparently are having trouble wrapping their heads around the idea that two of the most respected designers in golf (and guys whose creations a lot of you play) could make products that rival anything they’ve ever done before BECAUSE development and manufacturing costs were completely removed from the equation and retail costs was never a concern. It’s a tremendously important part of the story.

      So again, our intent was to provide just a bit of initial performance evaluation, and everything we saw both on the course, and on the launch monitor suggests a superior product offering, but the larger intent was to tell the full story of PXG. Frankly, I wish I had more time (and space) to devote to what’s going on inside PXG. Not to go all crystals and incense on you, but there’s a positive energy at PXG that I haven’t experienced on any other site visit. Whether that results from things being fresh, new and different (that new company smell), or if it’s a reflection of how Bob operates, remains to be seen.

      Reply

      Mike Williams

      9 years ago

      I play quality products and even try hard (that is pay a bit extra) to purchase from my local pro shop to be supportive of their role in the sport, but this pricing is just beyond me. Even if I saved a boatload of strokes per round which seems unlikely, I couldn’t consider them. And since I’m clearly not in the target market group, I probably won’t even see these clubs in any bags at the courses I play. That said, I admit, I would like to try them!

      Reply

      Alejandro

      9 years ago

      From my opinion, to call some equipment “the best” must have a percentage on Tour better that the rest… this is called “Tour validation”…

      Apart of this, looks nice and different… but if amateurs could change directly the screws, they will miss a lot of them… good business in this way…

      Reply

      Andy W

      9 years ago

      All day and all night, got to believe Ryan Moore’s caddy is checking screws for tightness.

      Reply

      Large chris

      9 years ago

      I believe this too….

      But the easy adjusting of swing weight could be great and should have been offered on regular clubs years ago. There is a gap in the market for this tech, but reality is – as stated – that they will need either 3 top 50 players OR a major victory (they should sign up Harrington) to make a dent.

      Reply

      andrew

      9 years ago

      did paddy leave wilson staff?

      joro

      9 years ago

      One thing I have learned is that without great, and expensive marketing you may have a great product but without sales you are gone. Also it sounds like these clubs may be the best, but how good are the people who will buying them. At that price there are only so many egotists out there with the bucks and no games. And last, you cannot buy a game.

      Having been in this business from the 60s I have seen hobbyists design the greatest clubs come and go. A club maker depends on not how good the club is, but what the customer can do with it, and sadly most customers rely on advertising.

      Reply

      Steve austin

      9 years ago

      Even if I could afford them i wouldn’t buy them because if they did not take me from a double digit handicap to a low single player I would feel like an idiot for wasting all that money on “magic” clubs. The viable market for these clubs must be so small that I don’t see them sticking around..
      If Rory or ilk start winning with them then maybe but untill then good luck with that.

      Reply

      Sharkhark

      9 years ago

      Rookie the first poster missed pricing. Was it added after? I don’t know how he would miss it otherwise. It’s in the article, the picture of the brochure etc etc several times over all prices all product line.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      The pricing was there from the start, but when Rookie missed it, I thought others might too, so I threw a header above it.

      Reply

      jericho

      9 years ago

      He may have looked at the article on a cell phone..some phones do not load entire pages

      Reply

      Rational

      9 years ago

      Boys and Girls – look at the lofts and length of a standard PXG iron set. Way too strong lofts first of all!. Does 2-3 degrees more than other manufacturer equate to better technology (longer and straighter)?. Also, THEIR revolutionary thermopasltic casting is not so revolutionary – PING has been doing this for years!

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      No doubt, the 0311 is built to game-improvement specs – and its inline with other GI clubs, but it’s the most playable club I’ve ever hit. I don’t care about specs, I care about performance. The goal was to create a club that offered the forgiveness of a GI club, with a look similar to a blade. They accomplished that.

      As far as the elastomer goes. Others have used TPU and TPE for backing, slots, and whatnot, but nobody (and definitely not PING where Brad and Mike came from) have done a hollow cavity with injection molded elastomer. It’s cost prohibitive for the mainstream. The rest is pretty simple…if others have been doing it for years, the US patent and trade office wouldn’t have issues a series of patents to cover what PXG is doing. This isn’t patent pending, subject to approval technology, PXG already has the patents.

      Reply

      W Martella

      9 years ago

      Even if they are designed as game improvement, for $325 I hope you can customize the lofting a bit. I assume most of the customers are not going to be low swing speed players. As such, strengthening of lofts is an issue. I love the concept of fully tune-able weighting, centering CG, low, high, whatever the player prefers. But if i can hit the PW 150+ yards, how is that helping with precision scoring?

      Maybe a follow up, players iron design would be an equally awesome challenge for this design team. I am curious how these will stack up pound for pound against a loft matched Ben Hogan TK-15 iron, for example.

      Duncan Castles

      9 years ago

      Another fascinating and well-written article Tony. Thank you.
      PXG’s strategy and story is a compelling one, but I have to agree that the lofts on the irons are ridiculous. A 5 degree gap at the bottom end of the set couple with 2.5 degrees at the top end is stupid, and will unnecessarily limit the performance of the clubs. It’s particularly senseless if the clubs’ fundamental design does – as described – produce greater distance and forgiveness. Why bother jacking lofts by a full club over traditional set ups when your technology produces extra distance in the first place?
      It’s an old argument, but no less relevant for it, but once you get reasonably consistent in your shot making you want predictable and consistent yardage gaps between your irons – not twice as big a gap between your scoring clubs and your long irons.
      Are the forged bodies carbon steel and to how many degrees can they be bent? If they can be bent into a properly gapped set, great. But really a premium set of golf clubs shouldn’t be gapped like this to begin with.

      Tony Covey

      9 years ago

      Duncan – You have to first look at the mandate. The goal was to build a club that could compete with GI clubs for distance and forgiveness, but offer the clean lines of a blade. Nobody is saying that PXG’s is a distance generating technology. In my estimation it’s really about forgiveness, consistent distance across the face to a degree I’ve never seen before.

      Let me preface this next part by saying we didn’t dig into the specifics of PXG’s gapping theory, so what I’ll say next is within a broader context. I think one of the biggest mistake golfers make is to look at length and loft progressions and make a broad determination that the set isn’t gapped correctly. That works when the only difference between the 4-iron and the wedge is the loft. That’s just not how clubs are designed anymore. Modern design are often progressive. What I mean by that is that in addition to loft, offset, sole width, even topline thickness change (or progress) as you move from one iron to the next. With PXG, there’s more TPE in the cavity of the long irons. All of that that influences relative cg positioning, and as we should all know by now, CG position impacts dynamic loft which, as opposed to static loft, is what’s actually responsible for creating the launch conditions at impact. Those factors change the gapping equation.

      As a quick point of reference, the cavity in the 0311 short irons isn’t nearly as large as it is in the long irons. That has to be accounted for. Look at gaps in slotted irons as well. Similar thing…as the shape changes so does the gapping.

      Mike Nicolette is primarily responsible for the 0311 design, and given his track record creating Ping irons, I have to believe he knows what he’s doing from a gapping perspective. The 0311 was put through robot and human testing just like any other OEMs products. Larger point being, don’t assume there’s a gapping issue just because of what’s perceived as uneven static measurements. I can basically assure you that with the way clubs are designed today…higher launch in long irons, lower, more penetrating in the short irons, I’d actually be more concerned if static gaps where absolutely the same from one iron to the next.

      All of that said, gapping is an imperfect science to begin with. The way I deliver the club (and the resulting performance) will be different from how you deliver the club, so the probability is that even within the same set my gapping will be different than yours. Maybe it’s noticeable…sufficient enough to warrant doing some bending, maybe not.

      But yeah…you can always bend them. No specifics, but 2° shouldn’t be an issue.

      Duncan Castles

      9 years ago

      Thanks for the detailed response Tony.
      The test will be in the playing, but I’ll be stunned if these gap correctly for any golfer – and in particular the average-ability golfer that they appear to be aimed in competing with GI clubs for distance and forgiveness.
      According to Tom Wishon: “Quite simply, loft is about 85% of the reason you hit each golf club a different distance. The length of each of your clubs comprises the other 15%.” And from what I’ve read offset does very little, sole width is primarily about turf interaction.
      Unless they’ve come up with something truly revolutionary, at these lengths and lofts the average-ability golfer is going to struggle to consistently hit what Parsons call their 3 and 4 irons. And will be borderline on the ‘5 iron’. http://wishongolf.com/using-a-solid-set-makeup-to-play-smart-golf/
      $900 is a lot of cash to be spending on three marginal clubs with a 5-degree loft spread (roughly 20 yards for the average golfer). But I presume they can can spend $1200 on three hybrids instead!

      Dave S

      9 years ago

      To your last point… this is why the new Ben Hogan irons are so intriguing to me. They fit you for – among other things – the EXACT loft specs that work for YOUR swing. You can literally get an iron in any loft, tailored perfect.

      Duncan Castles

      9 years ago

      Just stumbled across this discussion of appropriate yardage gapping for low-loft clubs from Tom Wishon. Makes for interesting reading.

      “In the old days, you are aware that the loft difference between most all irons was 4*. Then as the companies started to lower the lofts of their irons to sell more sets on the basis of distance, they soon found they had to shift the loft gap between the low number irons down to 3*. If they kept the usual 4* gaps this would put the lofts of the 2 and 3 iron to be too low for most golfers to ever be able to hit.

      “The first solution to that problem was to drop the 2 iron. Poof. No 2 irons anymore. And things were fine until this continued loft shrinkage by the big companies started to put the 3 and 4 irons into the same boat of compressing the lofts closer. And there we are today, with some companies having a 2* gap between then 3 and 4 irons, most everyone else using 3* – just so we don’t have to get to a 15, 16, 17 loft on a 3 iron because only God and Jack Nicklaus can hit an iron with that low of a loft !!

      “Now the fact is, because of the physics of clubhead design, the loft gaps between the low numbered irons really should be 5* to ensure that most golfers can get the same distance gap between their low number irons as they get between their high number irons. The reason is because most golfers cannot hit an iron with less than 25* loft high enough in the air to get it to carry to the full potential distance of their clubhead speed.

      “So the bottom line is that for MOST golfers, the distance difference between an 18* #3 iron and a 23* #4 iron would be closer to being what the golfer sees between his high number irons with their 4* loft gap. Not super high clubhead speed really good players – they’re ok with a 3* loft diff between their 3 and 4 irons. But for 98% of the golfers out there, we companies should be designing irons with a 5* gap between the 3 to 4 to 5 to 6, and then a 4* gap between the 6 to 7 to 8 to 9 to PW.

      “But the reason we don’t is because WAY too many golfers would question this as being too different. And then that would take an explanation equal to this one right here for every golfer. And while we can offer that explanation, none of the other companies want to do that.”

      http://wishongolf.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12836

      Marc

      9 years ago

      These club look great but forever picking the dirt, grass and mud out of the screw holes would drive me nuts.

      Reply

      Marty

      9 years ago

      Good point! I didn’t even think of that.

      Reply

      golfercraig

      9 years ago

      How in the hell would you get grass into the screw holes on the back of an iron?

      Reply

      Jericho

      9 years ago

      You must play off mats all day

      Jack Wullkotte

      9 years ago

      Good point

      Reply

      Fred

      9 years ago

      My fairway woods are all Titleist 915s. Every time I hit the ball with one of them, I have to dig a lot of grass and mud out of the slots behind the face. Gets a bit tiresome after a while. So I can see where the same might happen with the screws.

      Jon

      9 years ago

      Interesting concept, though the title of the article made me think it was spam when I saw it in my email. The click bait title really tarnished my impression of the article before I even read it.

      Reply

      Scud

      9 years ago

      Do you know how many “can’t miss” companies have tried to enter the golf market in the last 35-40 years? All with the same pomp and circumstance, marketing spin, etc. And each of them say the same thing – “but we’re different”. We’ll see.

      All I can say is Good Luck.

      Reply

      Wally

      9 years ago

      I can play the latest from Taylormade, Ping, or Titleist if I don’t have a good swing everyone of the clubs will produce the same result. I’m all for technology and stuff, but the shooter has to take some responsibility and not blame the arrow. These clubs, at their target price, will have to prove themselves first. Even then, it “might” not be worth a divorce!

      Reply

      Warwick

      9 years ago

      Mmmm – A lot of hype from MGS without any testing – unusual ….. I wonder what Bob is paying them?

      Reply

      mygolfspy

      9 years ago

      We did test the irons. We have not done #MostWanted iron testing yet. So we tested them against RSi1, RSi2, Mizuno, and Miura for a broad comparison. We also tested on course. What we saw was remarkable.

      And like we have stated on numerous occasions, we haven’t “sold out”. Bob paid us exactly $0.

      We can understand the many reasons golfers and consumers might want to not believe a guy like Bob Parsons creating something game changing. He is controversial, he is rich, he is also a lot of other things. But at the end of the day, we only care about two things: equipment performance and how that can help our readers.

      These irons while they cost more than most can afford, are so far the most interesting tech and performance we have seen since MGS was created. You can obviously choose to disagree, but how about you try them and see for yourself. I think your tone might change.

      Reply

      oliversax

      9 years ago

      Thank you for clarifying that you indeed tested these PXG irons. Can’t wait for next article on head-to-head performance. I trust MGS and for you to be this impressed this early really piques my interest.

      The design of these irons remind me of the Callaway FT irons, very forgiving but the hot face yielded long but inconsistent distances. I wonder how these PXG irons performed in the distance consistency department.

      Best news is that they make them for lefties, too! Rare that an equipment manufacturer would include us lefties in the mix since it’s very costly for them to do so. I guess Parsons is serious when he says cost is 2ndary to performance… I’m a fan already and I haven’t even touched his clubs yet.

      Can’t wait to see how these irons perform and, dare I repeat, ‘revolutionize iron innovation,’ in the fullness of time.

      Kudos, Parsons!

      Mike S

      9 years ago

      How it affects your reader? I’m confused. Or are you just talking about the 1% that could actually afford to play these clubs. They look a little weird, but that’s ok I’d rather play a weird looking club that performs than a good looking one that doesn’t. I’ll take your word on performance. I’d even be willing to try them out. But you have said many times this site is all about the “average” golfer, the mainstream. not the elite one percent. And these clubs will never be about the “mainstream golfer.” You know, the 85% that actually pays the bills for the golf industry. I bet these will do great in Japan though as well as among the elite golfers and the rich folk with more money than sense.

      Noel Daof

      9 years ago

      It’s really interesting. I wish I could take it at an open range with the correct lie fit and also play a few rounds with it to really give it a good evaluation for my self.

      Reply

      Dunce

      9 years ago

      I always like innovation and loved to the look of these when they came out, but the price is just ridiculous to me. I know golf is an expensive hobby, I could reasonably afford to spring for a set of these if I really wanted them, and they very well might be the best innovation to ever come to golf. I just can’t see justifying spending that kind of money on a set of golf clubs when there’s people on this planet who don’t have clean water to drink or have any idea where their next meal is coming from.

      Reply

      Bob Pegram

      8 years ago

      Do you send the money you would otherwise spend on golf clubs to the “people on this planet who don’t have clean water to drink or have any idea where their next meal is coming from.”?
      Not spending on expensive clubs doesn’t help those people unless the money goes to them instead.

      Reply

      DB

      9 years ago

      I think the entire line looks incredible. The only thing that doesn’t seem right are the iron lofts. 45 pitching wedge in player’s irons? Seems like 46 is the standard.

      Reply

      Jack Wullkotte

      9 years ago

      One degree doesn’t make a hill of beans. Remember way back, when pitching wedge lofts were 51 degrees? We’re talking almost 20 yards difference.

      Reply

      Fred

      9 years ago

      Yeah, Ben Hogan’s PW was called the eliminator, and he always said that the best lofts for PW was between 49-51. My Hogan PW is a 44. I do have a 49, but use it as a conventional wedge, not PW.

      1432fpchero

      9 years ago

      sorry fred…equalizer not eliminator

      Fred

      9 years ago

      Yep, you’re right. That said, though, that equalizer did eliminate a lot of players ;-)

      Ed

      9 years ago

      cool look, how did they perform vs. their target competitors?
      Imagine playing the same game after this club purchase. Interesting times in club house, or playing foursome!

      Reply

      Mark

      9 years ago

      They do look and sound intriguing, although at that price point they are well out of my range. I applaud the ingenuity of the products. But I really wish that they had thought a little harder on using “Xtreme” in the name. It comes off cheesy and just doesn’t convey the sense of an innovative club company in my mind.

      Reply

      Dave S

      9 years ago

      Totally agree. “PXG” is ok, but “Xtreme” is pretty dumb sounding/looking. They probably liked the acronym and realized the only way to make it sound good was to use an X. “PEG” doesn’t have the same ring. Although I’m not sure any variant of the word “Extreme” should be in the name of a golf club company. Who knows tho, maybe they’re onto something. Everyone thought Rickie Fowler’s extreme sport / Redbull persona was silly for a golfer, but now look at him… $$$.

      Reply

      Fred

      9 years ago

      I don’t recall the pro’s name, but there is a guy on the tour who uses them. Saw them in one of GolfWRX’s “What’s in their bag” pieces.

      Robert Dwyer

      9 years ago

      No I don’t think so! The word that comes to mind is gimmick.

      Reply

      Max

      9 years ago

      Nice! I often day-dream of being super rich and what I’d do and I always thought that creating my own golf club company would be one of the things I’d attempt. So I really like the fact that these guys are taking advantage of their good fortune and doing something like this. These clubs look great. Can’t wait to read some reviews. Maybe I’ll pick up a wedge or two while I start saving.

      Reply

      Marty

      9 years ago

      Hey, finally someone is making a club that makes my Miura’s seem affordable.

      Reply

      Jericho

      9 years ago

      There will probably never be an iron built that will look better than my 1957 baby blades ..a true surgical tool. ..will have to hit these for the heck of it of course.

      Reply

      Marty

      9 years ago

      Yep, I have the same irons. I can’t imagine these PXG irons will feel any better. Nothing I’ve come across has yet.

      Dave S

      9 years ago

      Funny, I’m having no trouble imagining it.

      Joe Mama

      9 years ago

      They’re screwed.

      Reply

      RookieBlue7

      9 years ago

      Maybe I missed it, but what is the cost of the clubs? I didn’t see it anywhere in the article or on their site. Saw things alluding to price but no prices anywhere…

      Reply

      Marty Neighbour

      9 years ago

      Around $300 per iron. Article references $2400 for a set of 8 irons.

      Reply

      RobN

      9 years ago

      Middle of the story, under the header “PXG: Price List”, is a chart that shows all the clubs. Directly under the photo and description of each club is the pricing.

      Reply

      tider992010

      9 years ago

      Very interesting read. I like the design. I hope the branding sells.

      Reply

      Dave S

      9 years ago

      Look awesome. Wish I could reasonably afford them.

      Reply

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