Titleist to Offer Pro V1x ‘Left Dash’ Through Retail Accounts
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Titleist to Offer Pro V1x ‘Left Dash’ Through Retail Accounts

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Titleist to Offer Pro V1x ‘Left Dash’ Through Retail Accounts

There’s a new flavor of Pro V1 coming to retail this October…well, sorta.

Beginning October 1st, golfers will be able to order the Left Dash variant of Pro V1x from any authorized Titleist golf ball account.

Left Dash?

As many of you are aware, it’s not uncommon for manufacturers to offer tour staff a selection of golf balls that aren’t available to retail customers. While some view that as an especially nefarious form of bait and switch, or jump to the conclusion that tour pros get the good stuff while average guys get the garbage, the truth is quite a bit less sinister.

Tour-only offerings aren’t magic, they’re not exceptional, or even better; they’re just different. The fact is +/- 85% of Titleist’s Tour staff plays exactly the same Pro V1 or Pro V1x that you and I buy at retail. Having said that, it’s also true that elite golfers are notoriously picky. While we may not sweat a degree or two here or there, the best players in the world are looking to launch through exceptionally specific windows, with equally specific trajectory and spin performance.

For those situations, Titleist offers what it calls CPOs – Custom Performance Options. The current CPO catalog consists of 3 golf balls, each to some degree different from the retail offerings.

Once upon a time, CPOs were available to PGA Tour Pros only. As the lines between PGA Tour and European Tour and Web.com/Korn Ferry and even the Tour Champions blurred, Titleist began offering CPOs across all the professional tours.

As CPOs trickled down, Titleist found increased demand among amateurs, particularly for the Pro V1x Left Dash. Demand is a relative term here. By no means is Left Dash a meat of the bell curve offering, but Titleist doesn’t try to hide the fact that it and the other CPOs exist. “There’s no secret sauce here,” says Michael Mahoney, Titleist’s VP of Golf Ball marketing. “It’s just another option in the matrix.”

Across the worldwide professional tours, use of Titleist CPOs is minimal, and in a reasonable world, that would be the case for the retail market as well. Between AVX, Pro V1, and Pro V1x, Titleist thinks it has about 95% of amateur golfers covered.

Left Dash Performance Characteristics

From a performance perspective, Left Dash (named for the “-“ on the left side of the side stamp) is described as a low spin Pro V1x. For context, it’s important to note within Titleist’s current lineup, AVX is low launch/low spin. Pro V1 is mid launch/mid spin, and Pro V1x is high launch/high spin. Those descriptions are, of course, relative, but the interesting note about Left Dash is with its high launch, low spin characteristics, it has a non-linear relationship to Titleist’s other tour-level offerings.

Another way to look at Left Dash; it has the higher compression of Pro V1x, but the low spin properties of AVX (Mahoney says Left Dash isn’t quite as low spin as AVX, but it’s close). It’s an option for high spin players who either don’t like the soft feel of AVX, or who don’t want to eat the ball speed loss off the tee inherent to low compression balls.

Where to Find Left Dash

The 4-piece Left Dash Pro V1x doesn’t replace anything in the current lineup, and you won’t find it sitting on store shelves next to Titleist’s other offerings. It’s unlikely you’ll find a stash hidden behind the counter at your local pro shop either. “It’s not the secret menu at In-N-Out,” says Michael Mahoney. While there’s always a chance that some green grass accounts may choose to stock a few dozen for 3 or 4 players within the membership, the overwhelming majority of sales are expected to be through custom orders. I suspect that the overwhelming majority of golfers won’t ever know the Left Dash option exists.

The Other CPO offerings

As I mentioned, Left Dash is one of three custom performance options currently available to Titleist’s tour staff. It’s the most popular of the bunch, which is why it’s headed to a catalog near you. Titleist has no plans to offer either of the other two CPOs in any retail capacity, but human nature being what it is, I thought you might be curious about their performance characteristics.

Pro V1 Left Dot

The Pro V1 Left Dot (3-piece) is described as a low flying, low spinning Pro V1. It’s an older model that served as a test case for what would become the 2017 retail Pro V1. Specifically, Left Dot served as a proof of concept for a design which allowed Titleist to increase speed without increasing compression. Left Dot is significant for starting a shift that led to a higher percentage of Tour Pros playing Pro V1. Before Left Dot, tour use heavily favored Pro V1x. Now, it’s a near-even split between Pro V1 and Pro V1x.

On a relative scale, Left Dot is more similar to Pro V1 than Left Dash is to Pro V1x. Current use of Left Dot on tour is minimal and driven mainly by subtle differences in flight characteristics. As an interesting footnote – Left Dot was the ball Rickie Fowler used before signing a a ball deal with TaylorMade and putting TP5X in play.

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Pro V1★

On the extreme end of the Titleist CPO offerings is the 3-piece ProV1★(Pro V1 Star). Billed as high spin and high compression, it’s the spiniest ball in the Pro V1 family. Effectively a niche offering within an already niche portion of the tour market, Star is the least popular of the CPOs. In some sense, it’s the opposite of Left Dash. The latter works for exceptionally high spin players, while Star is an option for exceptionally low spin players. Justin Thomas, for example, played Star for a run earlier this year while working on some swing changes that dropped his spin numbers appreciably. He has since moved away from the ball.

What Left Dash, Left Dot, and Star have in common is that each played a role in developing technologies used in the next generation of Titleist products.

Pro V1x Left Dash Pricing and Availability

The Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash Golf ball will be available for custom October 1st from authorized Titleist accounts. That’s everywhere from small green grass shops to Dick’s Sporting Goods.

There is no yellow option, and customization (custom player numbers) are not available at this time, though I suppose it’s worth noting that at this time often means maybe later, let’s see how this goes.

Retail price is $47.99, but the takeaway is you should expect to pay whatever you currently pay for Pro V1 or Pro V1x.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Paresh

      4 years ago

      Tony, since have played the left dash have you seen any discernible difference in green side spin for pitches and chips?

      Reply

      Todd

      4 years ago

      The green grass shop where I work is on the verge of selling more TM balls than Pro v’s now. The word is getting out. Better ball and a dollar cheaper per slv. If you haven’t compared the TP to the ball you’re playing ….you’re doing yourself a disservice

      Reply

      Jake

      4 years ago

      When you continue to lose market points each quarter you better find a way to sell more golf balls. Left dash it is! And yes Tiltleist is losing ground in the golf ball department. Not even a top three performing golf ball currently on the market.

      Reply

      Clay

      4 years ago

      There are already a lot of golf balls that launch higher than the Pro V1 and spin less. Soft balls with good feel. Balls that cost a lot less. Take a look at MGS’s ball test. Just sayin’.

      Reply

      duncan

      4 years ago

      i remember using prov diamond many years ago. loved the ball but didnt know the specs. i think it was sofy like a balata ball

      Reply

      Jack Malzahn

      4 years ago

      Please do

      Reply

      Greg

      4 years ago

      Good info Tony ,
      I would have thought the 4 piece ball would have been the pros preferred option.
      The pro V1x left dash sounds like the old pro v 1x . They probably made extra balls
      At end of run to ween the pros over that would not make the change early season My way of thinking a 4 piece ball is superior, I just wish they would configure the dimple pattern to stop the ball wobbling as it looses speed when putting as that is half the game a bit more technology in that area would be good.
      The location of ball to turf is very important just like a stool 4 legs wobble 3 legs and 5 legs don’t. Get the drift,excuse the pun. I did write into titleist about this and was ignored. I did a years study on putting when I retired .
      Also don’t like the curved line on the alignment it is to big of a distraction
      So I now play Srixon XV .
      Ricky Fowler will curse the day he went to Taylormade the seam in the ball makes them rollover left and right of target. But they do putt better.Go figure.

      Reply

      Daniel

      4 years ago

      Get a check go pro and spin balance your balls. The heavy side of the ball is not going end over end which is what the check go pro essentially does so when the ball slows down it will wobble at times. Ever since I started using the check go pro this wobble problem is a thing of the past. I won’t play a round of golf without a spin balanced ball. There’s really no gain from tee to green but putting is where the difference is night and day between a spin balanced ball and one that isn’t. I give a ball to people I play with and it blows their minds on how much of a difference it makes.

      Reply

      William Johnson

      4 years ago

      As a former Bridgestone ball fitter, much of your information is correct. Anyone who selects and plays a golf ball, any ball, without employing a proper launch monitor to confirm their data is on a fool’s errand. No tour player believes any ball manufacturer 100% of the time. Much of the information you have conveyed is right out of Titleist’s marketing materials. Its not necessarily wrong, it is just held together with marketing spin (not ball spin.)

      Reply

      LeeD

      4 years ago

      I was in the test panel for the AVX. I’m 55, and I’ve slowed down to a 90 mph driver swing speed, and I hit the ball relatively straight, just not as far as I used to. My feedback to Titleist was that I liked the distance gains I got with the AVX due to the reduced driver spin, but I disliked the lower ball flight. I would be interested to try the Pro V1x Left Dash, as I’m not particularly bought into the “lower compression = better feel” argument. Results to me are based on where it lands in the fairway, not the sound it makes coming off the club.

      Reply

      daviddvm

      4 years ago

      Great article Tony “find it cut it” Covey
      Keep up the great work and Rock’n the golf world!

      Reply

      steve

      4 years ago

      makes me really interested in a higher compression AVX. perhaps that would boost the spin a hair, but the low flight is very desirable.

      Reply

      Bob Pegram

      4 years ago

      I can understand why a high spin generating tour pro would want the left dash. However, most people don’t realize that the more backspin a shot has, the more sidespin it takes for the ball to curve off line. That is one reason it is more difficult to curve short iron shot.

      Reply

      MattStrube

      4 years ago

      Would be great to see some sort of chart of where each ball lies on a spectrum of “ideal” driver/iron swing speed across the X-axis and spin on the Y-axis. Someone has to figure out how to kill the confusion of ball selection

      Reply

      Jeff

      4 years ago

      Sounds great.

      Now how about a low launch high spin ProV1? That’s ideal for me.

      Reply

      Puma

      4 years ago

      Excellent information. Like to see more of this.

      Reply

      David E. Bassett

      4 years ago

      Nice piece, Tony. Thanks for keeping us ahead of the curve

      Reply

      MIGregB

      4 years ago

      Pretty nifty way of showing the quality & consistency of Titleist balls, too. Hope you got it free before cutting it up!

      Reply

      Dave Richards

      4 years ago

      I’m a low single digit handicap and I still firmly believe that 90% of the amateurs who play Pro v1’s of any kind are wasting their money. Most don’t have the ability to spin the ball on the greens and lose distance because of the high compression of Pro V1 balls. I play much less expensive 3-piece ball and score just fine. I’ve never liked the feel of Pro V1’s because of the high compression. I prefer balls in the 70-80 compression range, and I think most amateurs would benefit from dropping down to that range or even lower if their swing speeds are below 95 mph.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      4 years ago

      I strongly disagree. Most amateurs don’t hit the ball high enough or with enough spin. With lower compression often comes lower launch and lower spin, plus a loss in ball speed off the tee (though that’s minimal at slower speeds).

      Golfers have bought into feel stories and compression stories, and a whole lot of other nonsense. In reality, most would be better served with something like a Pro V1x. Many amateurs can’t spin the ball around the green because they’re playing a ball that robs them of the opportunity to do so.

      Reply

      MrHogan

      4 years ago

      Strongly agree with Tony on this point. Up until mygolfspy existed the consumer has not had the available information to make the correct choices in terms of equipment and especially the correct ball.
      The average golfer has been brainwashed into thinking only the better players with faster swing speeds can launch a ProV.
      Mygolfspy has provided us with the knowledge (all data driven) to make informed decisions on what equipment we can most benifit from.
      If anyone has not read or listened to the ball studies MGS has conducted, I strongly recommend you do before you buy your next sleeve of balls.

      ChrisK

      4 years ago

      I used to think what Dave says, because the ProV’s never really fit my game (i swing between 95-100 mph with driver). For me (and i know i’m in the minority), they just didn’t fly as far with my irons as other comparable balls. NOW, however, it seems to me they’ve changed something up with this year’s ProVIX ball — that baby works good with my driver and my irons. It’s easily the best ball for me (except it’s a few $ more per dozen). Tony, do you think Titleist made a substantial change to this year’s (2019) model, or is it just my imagination? Just curious, thanks

      Trent Stewart

      4 years ago

      After reading your golf ball guide article I decided to commit to one ball.
      Id previously played any “premium” ball that was on sale in Australia at the time from TP5 to Chrome Softs to Z Stars etc. Pro V1s were always a present from family for Xmas or birthdays!
      I settled on purchasing the 2017 version of the Z Star XV.
      A few online retailers in Oz sell 3 dozen of them for 99 AUD (67 USD) occasionally, and when they do, I snap them up.
      Very happy now that I get more consistent distance per club with enough check on the greens when chipping.

      golfinnut

      4 years ago

      I’ve always known the balls that the pro’s play had some sort of variant than the balls at retail. Now I see them. But I’m sure the general every day player probably wouldn’t see the difference if they were handed two different balls and told to hit them. Maybe I’ll find one in the woods. :)

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      4 years ago

      It’s tough to quantify for sure. Unfortunately, I think a good bit of golf ball marketing has been driven by a reliance on the idea that golfers can’t (or think they can’t) identify performance differences between golf balls (and that’s before we have the discussion about consistency and quality control).

      We all have a variance off the tee, so it can be hard to reliably identify distance differences off the tee, for example. The same is true on approach shots around the green. It can be difficult to identify and appreciate what can be anything from a few yards of additional roll to just a few feet extra on approach shots attributable to the ball, but the performance differences are real.

      What I would first say is that golfers should learn to trust themselves more. Most of know when we hit a shot crisply, and most of us know what the ball does (or is supposed to do) when we do. Sometimes when we think “I guess I didn’t hit that as well as I thought”, we actually did. The ball didn’t do what it was supposed to.

      The other mistake many golfers make is to continuously switch ball models (sometimes several times a round). When you commit to using the same ball for every shot, it’s a lot easier to identify and appreciate the performance characteristics of YOUR ball. Once you’ve done that, that other stuff I talked about becomes a lot easier to do.

      Reply

      Waazzupppp

      4 years ago

      Sounds like the perfect way for Titleist to steal retail customers from brick and mortar stores and get them to buy new “custom” models online. I mean, they clearly say, you can have your shop order them, but honestly, no smaller shops want to bring in 3-4 dozen balls to sit on a shelf waiting for someone to buy them – or worse yet, have a staff that would know the CPO ball vs. the standard.

      Great write up though! Makes me wonder how many others have the same programs and will follow suit.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      4 years ago

      As far as I know, Titleist has no plans to sell balls direct to the consumer from its website. As with other Titleist balls, left dash will be available from retail accounts (including brick and mortar). It will be interesting to see if larger online accounts (golfballs.com for example) decide to bring in some inventory.

      Reply

      Jarrod Watson

      4 years ago

      Tony, do you know of any stores that will definitely carry the ProVX left dash? Also, is this the ball that Titleist fitted you with, when you went to their facilities?

      Tony Covey

      4 years ago

      You’ll be able to order it anywhere that Titleist balls are sold (similarly to a custom number ball), but it’s unlikely that you’ll find it stocked and on display. My sense is that Titleist doesn’t want it sitting next to Pro V1 and Pro V1x where it could be easily mistaken for the primary offering.

      Yup. Left Dash is what I was fit into. I have dynamic loft issues and generate an excessive amount of spin because of it. Don’t like the feel of AVX (particularly off the putter). For me, Left Dash cuts enough spin, keeps flight high, and maintains speed off the driver. As I said, it’s the most popular of the CPOs, but it’s definitely not designed for the masses.

      John Marsh

      4 years ago

      A few years back we had the Senior Tour in our town – playing the course after their tournament I found a – PRO V1X+ – a Titleist rep said it was a Senior ball with a dimple design for higher ball flight – I enjoyed the ball but have not found one since

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      4 years ago

      X+ is an older CPO model (from before they were called CPOs). Hasn’t been played by anyone on tour in quite some time and Titleist no longer makes it.

      Reply

      MrHogan

      4 years ago

      Interesting and good read Tony. Also like the comment that the greater percentage of tour players play the same version of retail ProV we mortals play.

      Keep on cutting those balls open. Nice to see the core is centred without any steel cords exposed.

      Reply

      Gunter Eisenberg

      4 years ago

      I probably won’t see any performance difference with this left dash thing. I’m better off buying used Pro V1s to save money.

      Reply

      Billm311

      4 years ago

      This is what I have been asking for – an AVX PronV1x hybrid. I play best with a lower spin ball, but didn’t like the softer compression. The old ProV1X models were my jam, then moved over to Nike RZN tour black for a long time. After working through several brands, I am now testing Srixon XV, and haven’t been able to snag Bridgestone BX at decent price. This could be the model that brings me back to Titleist. I want the firm feel, explosive ball speed, but could stand to lose some spin across the board.

      Maybe my Instagram comments worked haha

      Reply

      Scoot24

      4 years ago

      Sounds like a way for Titleist to clear out some old stock at full retail price. They have continually been the sales leader due to marketing have they now “jumped the shark”?

      Reply

      RAT

      4 years ago

      exactly!!!!!

      Reply

      Gary B

      4 years ago

      Interested to know if the dash model is less spin off the driver and maintains the spin rate with short irons or less spin across the entire bag.

      Reply

      Shankster

      4 years ago

      What are the chances we see the left dot V1?

      Reply

      Brian

      4 years ago

      Interesting, but will stick to the $27 Snell’s!

      Reply

      Bobarino

      4 years ago

      I knew there were variants, but didn’t know the particulars. Interesting. I’d love to hear about other variants from other companies. Right now playing the Snell MTB-X. It’s almost a perfect golf ball for me – bombs off driver but still getting used to how much it sucks back on short irons. Guess I should learn to modify my trajectory and club selection. Golf is hard…

      Reply

      Barry Schwartz

      4 years ago

      I was at a Senior Tour event in the Philadelphia region a few years ago and watched Berhard Langer on the practice green. I was able to grab one of the balls and discovered it he was using the Left Dot ProV1s. It was the first I ever heard of that ball.

      Reply

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