2021 MOST WANTED SUPER GAME IMPROVEMENT IRON
Irons

2021 MOST WANTED SUPER GAME IMPROVEMENT IRON

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2021 MOST WANTED SUPER GAME IMPROVEMENT IRON
COBRA FMAX Airspeed
Inesis 500
Honma Beres 2 Star
Callaway Big Bertha B21
Inesis 500
2021 Best Super Game Improvement Iron
COBRA FMAX Airspeed
  • Best in overall Strokes Gained
  • Positive Strokes Gained in all three areas (short, mid and long)
  • Testers said it has an appealing look and design
  • Towards the bottom for distance
  • 1st
  • 2nd
  • 134.25 Yards
Runner Up
Inesis 500
  • Strong Strokes Gained rating in the short iron
  • Positive Strokes Gained in long iron
  • Testers liked the looks
  • Towards the bottom for distance
  • Testers reported poor feel off the face
  • 2nd
  • 6th
  • 134.96 Yards
Honma Beres 2 Star
  • One of the best Strokes Gained ratings in long iron
  • One of the best for total distance
  • A tester favorite for looks and feel
  • Testers thought the grip was too skinny
  • 3rd
  • 4th
  • 140.25 Yards
Callaway Big Bertha B21
  • Positive Strokes Gained in long iron
  • Among the leaders for total distance
  • Highly rated for feel and looks
  • Towards the bottom for forgiveness
  • 4th
  • 7th
  • 138.67 Yards
Best Value
Inesis 500
  • Strong Strokes Gained rating in the short iron
  • Positive Strokes Gained in long iron
  • Testers like the looks
  • Towards the bottom for distance
  • Testers expressed poor feel off the face
  • 2nd
  • 6th
  • 134.96 Yards

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Readers

Our Job is Your Game

At MyGolfSpy, our job is to provide independent, unbiased and objective testing so you can make more confident purchasing decisions. Our 2021 Most Wanted Super Game Improvement Iron Test is an indispensable guide for the off-the-rack buyer or for anyone looking for insight before their next fitting.

Higher handicappers, pay attention!

The best super game improvement irons won’t blow you away with distance. Instead, they focus on consistency.

Let’s take a closer look.

2021 Best Super Game Improvement Iron: COBRA FMAX Airspeed

Arguably, one of the best and most consistent irons to date. In 2021, the best super game improvement iron is the COBRA FMAX Airspeed.

Here are its rankings in our key metrics:

  • 1st in Strokes Gained
  • 2nd in Forgiveness
  • 9th in Total Distance

Yes, the COBRA FMAX Airspeed is the shortest iron of the bunch but it dominated the Strokes Gained department. It separates itself from the competition by nearly 0.20 in Strokes Gained. That’s a considerable difference between first and second place. If you’re looking for consistency, this may be your golden ticket.

Performance Grades

Below is 2021 Most Wanted Super Game Improvement Irons Test broken down by performance grades for each iron length. The percentages displayed for each iron represent the frequency at which each was among the best-performing irons for each tester across the test pool.

Iron Buying Considerations

Performance should be your primary concern when buying new irons but there are additional things you may want to think about before you make your decision.

SET MAKE-UP

Much like previous iron installments, it is critical to pay attention to your set make-up. In this year’s test, we see potential gapping issues with certain clubs. Loft can affect the performance from one club to the next throughout the set. Golfers who struggle to launch long irons high should consider replacing them with easy-to-launch hybrids.

SHAFT SELECTION

The number of shaft options for irons is growing. It can be challenging to navigate the different models, weights and flexes to find the right shaft for you. The answer to the best-performing shaft question stretches well beyond graphite versus steel.

Stock shafts in the game improvement category are typically lighter (often significantly so) than the other categories we test. That can be extremely helpful for creating higher launch (and higher spin). That’s helpful for many who fall within the game-improvement demographic, however, the lighter shafts can create control problems for higher swing speed players looking to maximize forgiveness.

DISTANCE VERSUS CONSISTENCY

Higher handicappers often struggle with distance and consistency. The super game improvement iron category offers golf clubs that can potentially assist with either component. Obviously, distance is marketable. Titleist T400, Honma Beres 2 Star and Srixon ZX4 rule the distance conversation, whereas COBRA FMAX Airspeed and Inesis 500 offer greater consistency. For a solid blend of distance and consistency, look at Honma Beres 2 Star or Callaway Big Bertha B21.

COST

When it comes to cost, the super game-improvement category offers an array of options. Pricing will always play a factor in purchasing decisions. At $220 to $350 per club, Titleist T400, XXIO Prime and Honma Beres 2 Star are in the upper echelon of price point. On the flip side, Inesis 500 is $499 for a six-piece set. There is plenty of value to be found but there is obvious craftsmanship in the best irons for higher handicappers.

BEST DISTANCE - TITLEIST T400

BEST DISTANCE - TITLEIST T400

The Titleist T400 produces eye-popping distance. As a high handicap golfer, you may struggle with distance. Rest assured, this club does not disappoint. If you make it your top choice, dial in your playing lofts to maximize performance.

FIELD NOTES

During each test, we look for trends that provide insight into where the market as a whole is moving as well as what noteworthy changes manufacturers have made to improve year-to-year performance. Additionally, we solicit feedback from our testers. We want to understand what they liked, what they didn’t like and why. Although we obtain their feedback, their subjective opinions do not influence, dictate or determine our testing rankings.

Trends and Tweaks

BEST FORGIVENESS - XXIO PRIME

BEST FORGIVENESS - XXIO PRIME

The XXIO Prime offers the best forgiveness in the super game improvement category. It provides a great blend of performance and proved to be appealing amongst the testing pool. If you're looking for consistency, look no further.

Notes From The Testing Pool

The following section details subjective feedback from our pool of 20 testers. Gathering feedback is an important aspect of any test. We use their feedback as a representation of what golfers like and dislike about the product we test. That being said, the feedback is strictly subjective. It does not play a factor in the rankings.

  • The COBRA FMAX Airspeed stole the show with the best overall Strokes Gained. Furthermore, it was well-received by the tester pool. Feel and looks were the top two attributes that appealed to testers.
  • Titleist T400, despite its finish, was a tester favorite. Even within the game-improvement category, golfers crave distance, and the T400 certainly checks that box. Its looks and feel stood out among the testing pool, though some didn’t love the acoustics.
  • For looks and design, Srixon ZX4 reaped a plethora of praise from testers. In a category where looks are hit or miss, the ZX4 is a standout.
  • Inesis 500 received mixed comments from the tester pool. Despite its strong performance, testers were not pleased with the design of the club. According to them, the offset was a distracting design concept.
  • With a phenomenal design, the testers were exuberant about the Honma Beres 2 Star.

2021 Most Wanted Super Game Improvement Iron Data

To filter and compare by club, use the drop-down list and checkboxes to select the irons you wish to compare.

It is important to note that while comparing the performance averages of 20 golfers with varying swing speeds and characteristics is interesting and sometimes useful, it doesn’t tell the complete performance story.  For this reason, we look at performance on a per-golfer basis. The overall rankings (listed near the top of this story) reflected the rate at which a club finished in the Top Performing Group for each tester.

Use the dropdown below to switch between long, mid and short irons. Mobile users can use their finger to scroll through the chart vertically and horizontally.

Expert Tip - Shaft Weight

Heavier steel shafts tend to produce lower launch angles with less spin. Lighter shafts (steel or graphite) tend to produce mid to high launch with more spin. Finding a shaft that matches your swing will help produce the desired launch conditions, and shot shape. Remember to keep an open mind and pay close attention to the shaft's influence on performance during your next fitting.

 

How We Test

Our mission is to help you find the best super game improvement iron for your game.

About our Testers

Over the course of several sessions, each golfer is required to hit 10 to 12 "good" shots with each club. Club order is randomized on a per-tester basis.

Limiting Variables and Gathering Data Reliably

To minimize variables, all testers hit Titleist ProV1 balls.

Both club and head data are captured using Foresight GCQuad launch monitors.

Crunching the Numbers

To determine our rankings, we collect key performance metrics with Foresight GCQuad. After eliminating outliers, we utilize a proprietary methodology to calculate strokes-gained values for each combination of tester and golf club. The iron that produces the highest strokes-gained values relative to the field average is our Most Wanted.

2021 Most Wanted Super Game Improvement Iron Product Specifications

2021 Most Wanted Super Game Improvement Product Specs

ProductPW LoftPW Length7 Iron Loft7 Iron Length5 Iron Loft5 Iron Length
Callaway Big Bertha B21

Check Price
43.2535.529.7536.7523.7537.875
Cobra FMax Airspeed

Check Price
45.535.532.7536.752638
Cobra T-Rail

Check Price
44.7535.7529.25372438.25
Honma Beres 2 Star

Check Price
4035.5283721.538
Inesis 500

Check Price
44.7535.37531.753725.538
Srizon ZX4

Check Price
42.7535.7528.537.252338.25
Tour Edge Hot Launch E521

Check Price
4435.62532372638
Titleist T400

Check Price
3835.526.2536.87520.7537.875
XXIO Prime

Check Price
42.2535.6252937.252338.125

2021 Most Wanted Super Game Improvement Iron  – FAQ

BUYING NEW IRONS

Q: How often should I buy new irons?

A: While on rare occasions there are quantifiable year-over-year breakthroughs, typically it takes three to five years for manufacturers to make significant performance gains. With the USGA further tightening restrictions on manufacturers, it’s possible, even likely, that it will take longer still moving forward. Our recommendation is to buy new irons only when they appreciably outperform what is already in your bag. Of course, if you want new irons because you want new irons, that’s fine, too.

Q: How do I determine the right category of irons for me?

A: The four categories of irons we test are player’s (cavity backs), player’s distance, game-improvement and super game-improvement. While there is some overlap between categories, your search should begin with an honest assessment of your skill level (handicap) as well as what you need in your game. While there are always exceptions, if your handicap is above 10 and ball striking is not a legitimate strength, consider game-improvement or super game-improvement. For more skilled players who hit the ball more consistently, a set of player’s or player’s distance irons may benefit your game the most. For those on the bubble, especially for those seeking a few more yards, the player’s distance category could be ideal.

Q: Does the shaft matter?

A: Absolutely. While changes to spin and launch differences are rarely massive, shaft changes frequently lead to improved accuracy, tighter dispersion and greater overall consistency.

Q: What should I look for when testing irons?

A: While golfers have been conditioned to consider distance to the exclusion of nearly everything else, even within the game-improvement category, we recommend looking at the little numbers and looking for small circles. When comparing metrics like distance and ball speed, be sure to look at your standard deviations (the small numbers usually found under the big ones on the launch monitor data screen). Smaller numbers mean better consistency which will usually mean more than an extra yard or two on the golf course. Similarly, look for tighter dispersion ellipses (small circles). We can’t overstate the importance of consistency with irons.

MOST WANTED

Q: How are the irons in the test fitted to each golfer?

A: We use a fitting process that we call fit from stock. Irons are fitted to each tester using the stock, no up-charge options from each manufacturer. We test one short iron, one mid iron and one long iron from each set. While there are no irons in our testing that feature adjustability, we fit to flex for each tester in the pool. Occasionally, manufacturers will send multiple sets with different stock shafts that we can utilize to improve launch conditions.

Q: How do you determine in which category to test a given set of irons?

A: To ensure we’re testing irons as alike as designers allow for, in addition to the design of the head itself (profile, sole width, etc.), we sort by length and loft. Our goal is to keep differences as minimal as possible within any test cohort. When an iron reasonably fits in more than one category, we defer to the manufacturer’s category choice.

Q: How is the 2021 Most Wanted Super Game-Improvement Iron Determined?

A: To determine our rankings, we collect key performance metrics with Foresight GCQuad Launch Monitors. After eliminating outliers, we use a utilize a proprietary methodology to calculate strokes-gained values for each combination of tester and golf club. The iron that produces the highest strokes-gained values relative to the field average is our Most Wanted.

Q: How is the “longest” iron determined?

A: The process to determine the longest super game-improvement iron is similar to how we arrive at our overall rankings. For distance, our critical metric is Total Yards. We identify the iron that produced the most total yards with the long and middle irons relative to the field average.

Q: How is the “Most Forgiving” iron determined?

A: We’ve taken a practical approach to forgiveness. The club for which strokes-gained values for the best shots are closest to the strokes-gained value for the worst shots (relative to the field average) is the Most Forgiving.

Q: You discuss subjective feedback for things like looks, sound and feel. How much do those ratings factor into your rankings?

A: ZERO. Our rankings are based purely on launch monitor data and quantifiable performance metrics.

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      Peter Jackson

      2 years ago

      I read an in depth review of the Cobra F Max Airspeed irons and it explains why these work so well for the majority of mid to high handicappers. The set has many features which help them to reduce the left to right misses which affects most higher handicap players. It’s not just offset but the longer irons have different hosel lengths to help to reduce slicing.

      Reply

      Gary Hattan

      2 years ago

      In 2020 your pick for best value in the SGI was Tommy Armour. Now in 2021they we’re not even in the contest. Why not?

      Reply

      MyGolfSpy

      2 years ago

      They were already tested.

      Reply

      Jack

      2 years ago

      Was the winning Cobra tested with a steel or graphite shaft?

      Reply

      JonD

      2 years ago

      Late to the party.

      Which one is best for women?

      So the Cobra is great in strokes gained vs the field. But last in distance.. The titleist is one club longer than the Cobra. So what would the strokes gained look like for a titleist vs cobra that go the same distance say a titleist 8 iron v a cobra 7?

      Reply

      Kurt W

      3 years ago

      Every time MGS shows an INESIS product, Decathlon NEVER has it in stock. What’s the deal?

      Reply

      Jack

      3 years ago

      I guess this may have been addressed but why are the Cleveland Turbo hybrid irons not included in this test ?

      Reply

      lefty

      3 years ago

      Cleveland HB launcher and Halo XL should be on the top of the list for super game improvement irons.

      Reply

      RealDeal717

      3 years ago

      I just want to know how is anyone stopping a 150 yd carry shot coming in at a 33* angle on a green with the T400 7i iron.. I realize that is really a 5 or 6i loft but still. I find the same issue with these modern lofted clubs. Being around that 145 carry and drawer of the ball… with a 7i I have actually gone backwards and started picking up weaker lofted sets like the i200’s and more recently the PXG 0311P Gen 2 and had them bent 2* weak. Now I get a much better launch and descent angle and can hold greens. And the longer shafts still get the swing and ball speed where they need to be.

      Prior to that I was gaming the first gen Cobra T-rails which have a very nice launch and spin retention makeup. Moreso than alot of these strong lofted hollow bodied irons.

      Reply

      Tazz

      2 years ago

      good job. i only build my sets by the loft gapping. for years now. the only way to go.

      Reply

      Danie Maré

      3 years ago

      On the Loft Jacking I am asking for you informed opinions.

      If both 7 irons go the same peak height and decent angle. Thus both look like a 7 irons from a trajectory point. One is traditionally lofted and the other jacked a bit, but through bona fide tech manages to look like a 7 through the air, can’t one legitimately then say the one 7 iron is longer?

      If now comparing the 6 to the jacked 7 just to matched lofts, but now you get a lower trajectory and less steep land angle, is it really apples with apples?

      Let’s give the engineers some credit. If they manage to match a desired trajectory one expect from a 7 iron with lower lofts good on them. Remember, people using these irons normally add a lot of dynamic loft and spin through their delivery, if jacked lofts helps with that while maintaining a good/desired ball flight, I say the objective of the club is spot on.

      Reply

      Kansas King

      3 years ago

      There really hasn’t been much for technology in the last 10 years that actually overcomes the effects of changes in loft. Loft is still the single biggest factor in terms of affecting distance and spin everything else being equal. If you cut apart an iron of today and compare it to one made 10 – 20 years ago, you will probably find that nothing has actually changed other than you might find some goo that primarily exists for sound and feel. The biggest change is likely in the iron shafts where companies have come out with much lighter and higher launching steel shafts. There is nothing actually inherently wrong with “loft jacking” as it essentially just takes your 6-iron but makes it the length of the 7-iron. The question is if effects of a shorter iron outweigh the negatives that are typically lower-spin and potentially lower-flight. The same issue exists for the longer-end of single length iron sets.

      The good thing for some companies jacking lofts is that it gives golfers more options for fitting. Some people will play better with lower and some better with higher lofts. There has not been any real universal improvement in iron technology over the last 10 years that actually improves performance for every golfer. There have been design changes but when it comes to golf club technology, most things in golf haven’t really improved much over the last decade. The biggest improvement in clubs is better tolerance but the rest is really minimal.

      The truly biggest leap in technology is with launch monitors and club fitting. People are seeing as big of performance gains as ever because many are now starting to go get proper fittings. Proper fittings allow players to truly determine if lower or higher lofted irons are better but there is still one mental issue that many iron buyers have a hard time ignoring. That’s distance. Launch monitors are great but the current fitting and demo model puts the 7 iron in everyone’s hands. Mentally, it’s difficult to buy the shorter iron regardless of the other metrics provided by a launch monitor. One thing most golfers, even mildly experienced golfers, don’t actually understand is that golf marketing is so permeated throughout all golf publications that it’s difficult to discern actual information from marketing jumbo. Anytime you see or hear the word “tech”, it should raise a red flag and make you ask questions. What does tech mean? How did they do what they are achieving? etc. You will almost almost find out tat there isn’t any real new technology.

      Reply

      I wish they would start marking irons like they do wedges with loft (many cases) vs a random #. I realize that there is more to distance than loft. But then at least I would know how much added length is loft jacking and how much is design.. My driver and fairway would go a certain length and my 50* wedge goes a certain distance. I have room for 8 clubs in between. I want consistent gaps between clubs that offer enough forgiveness for my skill level. ( 7-8 handicap).. My longest iron needs to be at 180 to reach my 2 hybrids. I don’t care if it says 4 or 6 or has a dancing monkey on the sole.

      Reply

      Kansas King

      3 years ago

      I know there has been some discussion about lofts already and matching lofts instead of using the same iron for each category of club length. I’m sure this may not work the best with the strokes gained methodology but what if instead of using the number stamped on the bottom or lofts, you asked your testers to target a certain distance and use the best club for said distance. Let’s say you target 115, 145, and 175 yards instead of a specific club or loft. Most testers would use different clubs but it would be interesting to see how the testing would turn out because the data would be determined based on a specified distance, not just an arbitrary stamped number.

      I think this would measure real world performance more closely as the testers would actually be using the irons to hit a target as they were intended instead of just sending balls down an endless digital range with not specific goal in mind. I would be curious to know if this is an off base idea or not because it seems to make sense in my mind.

      Reply

      Steve

      3 years ago

      Hard to believe the T400 finished where it did. Yes, even though the lofts are “generous” it’s been great for me especially in the mid range.. Long and forgiving.

      Reply

      Kansas King

      3 years ago

      The T400s are good clubs and likely would have finished higher if they would have used a shorter iron in each category to better match the lofts to the competition. Lower lofted clubs are less forgiving across the board.

      Reply

      Scott

      3 years ago

      I have a full set of T400 in graphite R flex — 6i to GW. I found them considerably longer (though maybe not loft for loft)), and higher launching. But I also struggled with long/short misses. I can get a 7, 8 or 9i spinning around 2500 to 3500 revs. playing conditions in rough and flyers made it even worse. I now use the t400 5,6 and 7iron (I purchased the 5 iron as a single (20 degree). Then I blend with my Cobra 1-length 7i to SW. I find I get the distance boost I need in the longer irons and then the consistency I need in scoring and approach shots. Disclosure: 62 yrs old, play 2 -3 times a week, 8 -9 hdcp.

      Reply

      Robert Dicks

      3 years ago

      Tony and team, I love your Most Wanted tests. But I do not understand. It looks like you tested the Cobra F-Max Airspeed in 2020 for SGI, and the numbers are different. I assume a two-year life for the club, so it’s likely the same hardware. How can the numbers be different in 2021 when comparing same test numbers? See 2020 SGI Most Wanted at http://mygolfspy.com/best-super-game-improvement-irons-2020/ … thx.

      Reply

      Matt L

      3 years ago

      I would think the different numbers would be due to a different group of testers being involved in the two separate tests. I would think after two years there wouldn’t be the exact same group involved. Just speculation on my part though.

      Reply

      Rod

      3 years ago

      I know the ZX4’s are difficult to categorize, but how in the world did you settle on SGI?

      Reply

      Jordan

      3 years ago

      Exactly my thoughts. Legitimately I’ve seen an interview with people from srixon saying that their super game improvement equipment was the Cleveland stuff while srixon is geared toward players gear. These clubs are in the wrong category 100%.

      Reply

      Kansas King

      3 years ago

      I personally was amazed at how big the ZX4 heads were in person. They were borderline hybrids. To categorize them anything other than SGI would be incorrect. Srixon wants the “brand” to appear as a player’s brand but the reality is that the ZX4s are just another SGI set. Golf companies can’t survive on single digit handicap golfers alone.

      Alessandro

      3 years ago

      ZX4 are forged face SGI, maybe something new for Srixon, that offer a premium construction iron even for high handicappers…

      Reply

      Rod

      3 years ago

      I respectfully disagree. While they can probably be gamed by high-cappers, that applies to a lot of GI irons today. The thin top line, minimal offset and small-ish footprint are not typically found in the SGI category, and would be intimidating to a lot of high handicap players. Even MGS had this to say about the ZX4:

      “So, into what category does the ZX4 fall? Let’s just say it’s a “super-forgiving hollow-bodied game improvement player’s distance iron with forged feel.””

      Seems to me the ZX4’s straddle the GI and player’s distance categories.

      Gregg

      3 years ago

      Very good, have had Adam’s and Taylormade irons and Cleveland @calaway wedges. Went to g400’s last year and love the Balance and feel went for lessons at golftec learned how to hit a draw and turn more and work on my swing. Thanks for the insight cause knowing and doing is two different things I already know I won’t live long enough to figure it out but iam having a blast.

      Reply

      Steve Smith

      3 years ago

      Loft, loft, loft. Yes there are major differences between clubs with the same number stamped on the bottom. Stronger lofts go farther.

      Take a tip from Lee Westwood – holder of the record for most majors played in without a win (he’s still pretty good!). Write YOUR average carry distance on the BACK of the club. Hit that club for the distance you have to cover. Forget what’s stamped on the bottom.

      Your old 7 iron carried 150 yds but the new spring face/tungsten bottom weight 7 iron goes 162? Mark 162 on the back. Your “new” 8 iron probably goes 150 now. Write that on the back and use the 8 iron at 150 yards. Simple.

      Reply

      Steve S

      3 years ago

      I used to complain about the loft jacking with these tests but I was missing the point. MGS is comparing irons in the SGI category. How each company decides to get there is their choice. Titleist is longer but ranks towards the bottom in strokes gained. I’ve played Mizuno MX25’s for years, they were shorter than many competitors but I hit more greens with them, which is all that matters to me.

      Reply

      Henri8

      3 years ago

      I recently purchased a set of the Cobra T Rails . While it took several outings and trips to the driving range to figure out how to hit them, I have regained the distance I have lost in the last 10 years. I initially thought it was a bad purchase as I had a difficult time hitting the clubs.
      With that said, great set of clubs; I am hitting my 7 iron 150 yards once again and the 4,5 and 6 hybrids are phenomenal. I have never hit them so far. A++ to Cobra

      Reply

      Don Banks

      3 years ago

      I
      I”ve gained a lot from this site and I’m sure your tests are conducted as fairly as possible. However, I’m now shooting in the high 70’s, mostly 77-80 on various western N.C. courses while previously 2 -3 months ago, I was barely breaking 90. The difference? In my opinion, it consists of two things, practice range work and buying a set of Calloway Mavirks. I land shots on the green where before I had no idea if they were going right or left of a green. I can hit 6 irnos and I can get pitch to the green. These clubs have given me confidence like no others. I might be convinced as to how they might not be the absolute BEST in forgiving irons, but I could never ben convinced that they’re not even mentioned !

      Reply

      Steve S

      3 years ago

      Because they are not super game improvement(SGI) just GI, game improvement. Look at the article on GI irons….

      Reply

      David

      3 years ago

      That’s because they came out early last. They were in last years test. The Max in the SGI category and the regulars in the GI category. That took me literally less than 5 minutes to check.

      Congrats on the improvement in your game

      Reply

      Sandy

      3 years ago

      Very interesting. I bought a set of Mavrik irons because I love my Mavrik driver and FW and thought I might need upgraded technology for my irons. I didn’t like them at all and sent them back. They were grossly inferior to my Apex CF 16 irons in feel, and performance and am now trying to find a backup set of CF 16’s.
      As to the testing of the game improvement irons, I was surprised at the maximum 7 iron distance of about 140 yards., were you? I will be 81 next month with a swing speed to match and hit my 7 iron 145 and can easily push it to 150 if needed.

      Reply

      Brandon

      3 years ago

      What if I told you sometimes I play blades, and sometimes I play a super game improvement/hybrid set, and the irons in my bag have no bearing on my score. Short game and keeping the ball in play off the tee are what leads to good scores.

      Reply

      JPBall

      3 years ago

      I’m sure MGS answered this question in the past, but what exactly are the long, mid, and short irons?

      Reply

      Phillip Bishop

      3 years ago

      In our testing, we hit 5 Iron, 7 Iron, and PW in each model.

      Reply

      HAC

      3 years ago

      Do you count long irons less in your ratings for super game improvement clubs because most players who buy clubs in this category use hybrids rather than long irons. My iron set starts with a 6 iron and I have friends whose first iron is an eight iron.

      David Van Vliet

      3 years ago

      When you did your distance test did you match lofts instead of the number on the club? The Cobra FM Max Airspeed have more traditional loft of 45 degrees for a PW. The Titleist T400 have a loft of 38 degrees for A PW. If you look at the set the actually had to put an iron in the set between the gap wedge and PW. Most sets a 38 degree is a 9 iron. So it’s not a surprise it went longer. I’ll never buy another set with jacked up lofts, you end up with huge gaps between the irons.
      Give me a set with 4 degrees between each club and I’ll figure out when to stop buying irons and move to hybrids.

      Reply

      John

      3 years ago

      Had already placed on order for a set of Mizuno JPX921 Hot Metals weeks before I read this review. Don’t know if that was a mistake, or not, but how can I tell since this review doesn’t mention Mizunos?

      Reply

      Jr

      3 years ago

      You should be fine. Those are great clubs. They are in the GI category thought not SGI.

      Reply

      LesterPK

      3 years ago

      Not a mistake at all, you’ll be fine with them.
      http://mygolfspy.com/2021-most-wanted-game-improvement-iron/

      Reply

      Peter Covell

      3 years ago

      One thing that jumps out is the very large difference in the lofts. The Titleist T400 have significantly lower loft than the other clubs. No wonder they are longer. Tom Wishon has railed against the loft strengthening over the years, and it is being done much differently by different companies. Not sure how you normalize the distance results to account for loft differences.

      Reply

      Ryan F

      3 years ago

      Every time there is discussion about loft jacking, the response is usually something like “it’s just the number stamped on the bottom” and doesn’t really matter. However, when we’re talking about testing, apparently the number on the bottom does matter. Your testing the Titleist T400 and saying it is the distance leader, well of course it is because the T400 5-iron is basically a 4-iron in every other set and it’s 7-iron is a 6. Same can be said of the Cobra FMax that won the test. Of course it is near the bottom for distance because it has comparatively weak lofts. The FMax 5 iron has the same loft as a 7 iron in the T400 or a 6 iron in the Big Bertha.

      The metric also matters beyond distance as forgiveness becomes less important when the loft increases so it’s no surprise that the FMax finished 2nd in forgiveness since it is basically an entire club weaker than the rest of the field.

      Why not compare clubs of similar loft instead of just grabbing whatever club happens to have a 5 or 7 stamped on the bottom of it?

      Reply

      Franz

      3 years ago

      Exactly.
      If comparing “loft for loft” irons, there’ll be a bit of shaft length difference, maybe 1./4 inch. That wont make a massive difference, whereas 3 or 4 degrees of loft will very significantly change spin, speed, launch angle and ultimately distance. When I look at most (even “weakly” lofted) game improvement irons compared to my Bridgestone CB irons (35° 7i and “japanese length shafts” count 0.25 inch less than “western standard”) I see 1 to 3 club numbers difference for EXACTLY the same “package” (length, lie, loft).

      When I play those “modern game improvers” I figure myself a monster… but who needs à 210 yards 7 iron with 4000 rpm spin ????

      Reply

      Rob

      3 years ago

      Because they test the way consumers buy clubs. A average joe golfer isn’t going to know enough about lofts to ask the salesman at Big Box R US to hit a T400 5 iron and F Max 7 iron. He’s going to ask to hit the T400 and FMax or any iron he’s interested in.. Now a good salesperson would 1) have the knowledge of the lofts and 2) take the time and care to explain that to Joe, but we know that happens very rarely.

      But to answer your question, it’s as I said, they test clubs he way consumers buy them.

      Reply

      Nat Robin

      3 years ago

      I always appreciate these articles. Thanks
      I just wish Golfworks would send their stuff in. Their KE4 S cannot be beat for a super game improvement club in my opinion.

      Reply

      George

      3 years ago

      I just purchased a set of the Srixon ZX4 Irons. My previous set was the Mizuno JPX 919 Hot Metal. The Srixon’s feel and sound like you’re hitting a forged head and the performance is probably 1/2 club longer than the Mizuno’s. I think the Srixon’s are under rated and I like mine a lot.

      Reply

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