AskMyGolfSpy Vol. 23
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AskMyGolfSpy Vol. 23

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AskMyGolfSpy Vol. 23

Welcome back to #ASKMYGOLFSPY where readers like you submit questions to our team of experts here at MyGolfSpy! 

Submit yours anytime on TwitterFacebookInstagram or in the comments below.

Let’s get into it.

PXG Xtreme Golf balls are available now through PXG.com and PXG retail locations

Is the PXG Xtreme ball just a Kirkland with the PXG logo?

While I’ll concede the core coloring of the PXG ball bears a strong resemblance to that of the original Kirkland, the core of the PXG ball is unique and proprietary to PXG. From a compression standpoint, it falls in the upper 90s which is appreciably firmer than the Kirkland ball.

The PXG ball will be faster (and longer) off the tee.

That said, it likely uses the same tooling and the dimple patterns are identical. With that, my expectation is that the PXG ball will fly similarly to the Kirkland though flight should be a tick lower because the PXG ball won’t spin quite as much.

A Vokey SM9 Jet Black Premium Wedge

Will Vokey SM9 wedges be available in “The Best Finish” this year?

For those of you who aren’t in the loop: “The Best Finish” is the Slate Blue that found its way into the SM8 lineup. For Season Two of the SM9, Vokey is using what it calls Jet Black Premium as its, well, “premium” finish option.

Jet Black Premium wedges just hit retail this week.

From what I’ve heard from the Vokey team, it’s highly unlikely Slate Blue will return for SM9 (fingers crossed for SM10). The Best Finish won’t be available but, for what it’s worth, Jet Black Premium is arguably the next best finish.

Are they doing a T Grind on this one?

Y’all really know how to push my buttons, don’t you?

No. They are not doing a T Grind on this one. Don’t even get me started.

How is the Maxfli ball considered DTC? Direct to DICK’S and then to the consumer, aren’t they?

We frequently refer to the Maxfli ball option as direct-to-consumer which has caused some confusion and consternation.

The definition of DTC in the golf ball space is a bit blurry but we think Maxfli fits the definition as well or better than most.

Maxlfi Tour balls are manufactured exclusively for and sold exclusively through DICK’S-owned stores as well as online.

There are some smaller ball brands with no distribution beyond their own websites but many brands commonly accepted as “DTC” are sold not only through the company website but are also available from retailers like Amazon, GolfBalls.com and even Target.

The closest parallel to Maxfli is probably PXG. Its products (which now include a golf ball) are sold online and at PXG’s retail locations.

Perhaps the better distinction is between new brands and the establishment but, in either case, we think Maxfli fits the label.

Another Maxfli question: Will the new Tour Series be available in yellow?

We checked with the guys at DICK’S and can confirm the new Tour Series will be available in yellow but not until August.

Some pros use metal spikes but we can’t at most courses. Do they help?

On one hand (or foot), I’d be inclined to say, “Of course they do. A pro would never use an inferior piece of equipment.” Then I remember countless examples across nearly every equipment category where PGA TOUR pros have done just that.

Unfortunately, metal spikes were being phased out just as I started playing so I don’t have any “first-foot” experience. That said, what I’ve read suggests course-friendly spikes found in modern golf shoes provide better lateral traction than the old nails and that’s what you need for a golf swing.

Worth a mention: the metal stuff being worn on Tour now is largely what I’d describe as a hybrid spike. Think of it as an old school metal spike wrapped in a modern soft spike. I imagine it’s a “best of both worlds” design.

So I’d wager the modern soft spike provides better traction than a spikeless golf shoe but probably not as much as the hybrid spikes being worn on Tour.

So, yeah, you’re probably giving up a little but it’s a small price to keep greens rolling smooth.

GOT MORE QUESTIONS?

Got a question for #AskMyGolfSpy? Leave it in the comments below.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

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      Braxton Strong

      1 year ago

      So Titleist just released a T grind wedge days after you said they weren’t going to.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      1 year ago

      What I said was the T Grind wouldn’t be available in Jet Black Premium. I think if you check the Vokey site, you’ll find that’s accurate.

      Reply

      WYBob

      1 year ago

      Question for the next Ask MyGolfSpy (#AMGS):

      I game a Pro V1 and it played great at 600 Ft. Above Sea Level. I now play at 6500 Ft. Above Sea Level and have noticed that the trajectory of the Pro V1 is flatter and lower. I realize altitude does not affect spin, but it appears to affect trajectory. All things being the same, would I be better off switching to the Pro V1X or similar to get a more optimal trajectory at my new course altitude?

      Reply

      Duffer E

      1 year ago

      Question for the next #AMA:

      Can you explain why a putter would do very well @5 feet, poorly @10 feet, but very well again @20 feet (i.e. the Evnroll EV5)? I could see a putter going from good to bad, or vice versa…

      Reply

      Tampon Woods

      1 year ago

      Plastic spikes is literally the biggest scam that they could have come up with. I go through a set of spikes every 6 weeks, I can’t imagine how often the Pros on Tour replace them.
      And we’re supposed to be reducing micro-plastics, are we not?
      At least they’ve suckered people into thinking that they can wear spikes-less that they can also wear from home, wear in the clubhouse and wear to go out on a casual activity, even! How dumb.
      Golf shoes should never have changed from metal.
      And now that we are allowed to tap down spike marks on the greens, give us back the metal and quit BIFURCATING those who are not on Tour from being able to play exactly like the Pros. The reasons and excuses are as pathetic as the PGA Tour introducing non-cut events

      Reply

      Josh

      1 year ago

      If you’ve been playing long enough to know how metal spikes feel, maybe take some calming breaths, ’cause there is clearly a lot more going on that just being bothered about gaming consumables…

      In particular fascinated that you rant about the PGA detachment from casual play in one part, but then put down spikeless shoe wearers in another. Spikeless is great man, and I’m swinging @108.

      Reply

      Jeff

      1 year ago

      I’m in my 50s and metal spikes provide way better traction in any condition hands down. Grew up wearing metal spikes but agree that good players can wear pretty much anything. Ashamed people can’t pick their feet up on the greens but I think soft spikes do more damage.

      Reply

      WBN

      1 year ago

      As a slower swing speed person always looking for extra yards, I have a question about compression. Will you benefit more from a softer ball that compresses easier or would a higher compression ball activate the trampoline effect of the driver due to the hardness and give a few extra yards? I probably have too much time on my hands, but just curious.

      Reply

      John Vecchiarelli

      1 year ago

      A ball more firm will always go farther.. I currently use TaylorMade Tp5x. My driver swing speed is about 72 mph. The swing speed was monitored on a launch monitor. On recommendations from my fitter I tried a very soft ball. Felt nice. But did not go as far and was a joke around the greens. You really need the control around the greens as it will literally save you two or more strokes..I realize that many people object to the price of premium balls but the performance outweighs it. You can, as an alternative use a ball in the second tier as the are more affordable.

      Reply

      WBN

      1 year ago

      Thanks for the reply. I did use a firmer ball the other day and liked the results..

      Jim

      1 year ago

      Spikes seemed useful for me when you were in a lie with significant slope, loose/wet turf or the like. Mostly a modern treaded shoe works just as well if not better, and is significantly more comfortable to walk in.

      And one of the best golfers I have played with wears Teva sandals on the course most of the time, so I figure the grip aspect is overrated in any case.

      Reply

      Tampon Woods

      1 year ago

      Does he play in any BIG events like that? Such as proper handicap games and national events, qualifiers? What’s his name, and what’s his index

      Reply

      Brenton Slee

      1 year ago

      Hi MGS

      I have contacted Dick’s in regards to buying the Maxfli Tour balls in the bulk pack
      Iv’e been told they don’t do International shipping ( I’m in Australia ) but may be looking at it in future.
      Can you provide me details of anyone who sells these balls & at cost effective shipping rate

      Cheers

      Reply

      RT

      1 year ago

      The spike was terrible for the avg. golfer and the greens.. The lazy foot person (is a person that will not pick their feet up and drag their feet, thus damaging the greens and etc.. The present plastic cleats work well with less damage but the studded soft treads are best for lazy feet types….The light weighted shoe is good in helping a player to pick up their feet thus less drag scuffing up the greens..

      Reply

      Joseph Greenberg

      1 year ago

      Esteemed sir: i believe, as something as a golf marketing guy after a few decades, that the term for Maxfli you are searching for is: private label. This connotes that the product is made for a retailer to be sold exclusively through their channels (brick and mortar, online). Hope this helps.

      Reply

      Yaaqob

      1 year ago

      But it isn’t just made FOR the retailer. It is made BY the retailer. “Direct-to-consumer (DTC) is a retail model where brands sell directly to new customers. It skips the wholesale middlemen…” This is the definition of DTC, and exactly what Maxfli is.

      Reply

      Brian Ruggieri

      1 year ago

      What is your opinion on Snell balls. I like them but don’t know many golfers that use them. Would love to hear your thoughts on Snell vs other top-quality balls to see if they measure up. Thanks

      Reply

      Gary

      1 year ago

      I’m old enough to grow up with spikes. I do miss the sound. New shoes soles have so much traction available compared to the old spiked shoes. I imagine the Pros do it next they can. I doubt they use spikes at their home courses.in casual play or even practice.

      Reply

      Patrick

      1 year ago

      Got one for you. I’ve been playing clones from Diamond Tour for more than a decade- they play very well for me, and I love that I can get a nice club for next to nothing- replaced all of my iron heads for $60- I did the work, but it’s easy. How do you think clones stack up against the name brand? Have you thought about testing it? In a hitting bay, I do just as well with my maverick clones, as I do with my buddy’s one length forgedtec.

      Reply

      Bob

      1 year ago

      Does anybody know anything more about Kirkland irons I the ask the information guy at Costco and nothing bummer

      Reply

      Jim Tyler

      1 year ago

      I have been at this a long time (81) was in Golfworks/Ralph Malbys first class. Really. appreciate what you do and the simplicity of your results – presentations.
      Thanks for YOUR time-effort and keeping the manufacturers on their toes – someone has to. Jim

      Reply

      Tom Styczen

      1 year ago

      Would appreciate a review on the best sunglasses for golf.

      Reply

      Tampon Woods

      1 year ago

      https://shadyrays.com

      Reasonably priced, does the same thing, free returns/trials if you don’t like/ doesn’t fit, unlike the designers brands

      Reply

      Barry Schwartz

      1 year ago

      I ‘m on old-ish fart and remember metal spikes. I”ve tried spikeless and prefer the plastic spikes (New Balance fan here in 4E width). I had heard back in the day that the reason clubs went to softspikes was not to protect the greens but because the metal spikes were destroying the carpeting in the clubhouse.. That makes sense, because if you walk properly on the green the metal spikes are no worse, perhaps better than the softspikes that replaced them.

      Reply

      Robert Pace

      1 year ago

      Back in the day there was a spike that was made from a ceramic tungsten ball welded to the spike, it was great because it never wore out…but were slippery as hell on hard surfaces.
      Champ sports makes the stinger pro, a soft spike with a metal spike in the middle. Paired with a set of hybrid shoes it is the best of both worlds, however it is critical to pair them with the right shoe because of spike height,the height of the soft spike needs to match the height of the shoe spikes.
      Now if you look at the longest drivers in the world, that front foot does not stay planted. So are they for you?….only you will know.

      Reply

      PJ

      1 year ago

      Hope the Tour X Maxfli will be available in yellow as well. Agree the Tour in yellow is a great ball.

      Reply

      Dustin Darnell

      1 year ago

      When are the results of the steel versus graphite shaft test going to be published.? I saw that it was taken down but never put back,

      Thanks

      Reply

      Ring 'O Fire

      1 year ago

      As for spikes. – I don’t wear any type of “spike” any longer. Looking back now at the days/time when only steel spikes came with golf shoes they were 1) not all that comfortable and 2) slippery on hard surfaces. They also created wear and tear on concrete and other surfaces in and around the clubhouse. The shoes generally were probably not as comfortably built as they are today. However, I think the modern plastic spikes are worse on the greens than steel spikes ever were. The modern plastic spikes are like dragging a leaf rake across the grass for those that can’t pick up their feet. They also make a larger impression on the surface of the green. Conclusion… most golfers don’t need or require any spikes. Certainly not in dry conditions.

      Reply

      Ant

      1 year ago

      Interesting No Putt Given on the cost of Drivers.

      Question: In your opinion would driver/club costs come down if certain manufacturers dropped the yearly update cycle and went on a two year update cycle? Also would this benefit the consumer in having a better performance upgrades and better residual values?

      Reply

      Tim Halleran

      1 year ago

      I tried the PXG golf ball yesterday. It was a complete fail The ball is “extremely” hard. It felt like I was hitting into a piece of granite. My club head speed is 104.
      I bought three dozen to save on shipping. They may make it my shag bag????

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      1 year ago

      I’d be curious to know what ball you normally play. Our preliminary measurements of the PXG Xtreme ball came in at 97. That’s identical to both the 2019 and 2021 Pro V1x. It’s definitely a firmer ball.

      Reply

      Mike Giuliano

      1 year ago

      Is there a way to tell if one’s set of irons are too draw biased?

      Reply

      Brian

      1 year ago

      I play blades with hardly any offset. I was tempted, in the late 1990s into buying Ping Eye 2s. I hooked everything. I was still trying to set my hands, (a blade thing). Of course the offset on the Eye 2s set your hands for you to a large extent, so basically I was doubling without knowing.

      Give me a blade any time!

      Reply

      Branden Wheeler

      1 year ago

      Is shaft flex really more important or is it a feel that some prefer? I have a swing speed that averages 113 mph and I have more consistency with a stiff flex shaft than I do a X-stiff shaft. Is there anyway to test this theory? Mind you the stiff flex shafts are 10 grams heavier than the X-stiff shafts I have.

      Reply

      Jim

      1 year ago

      Metal spikes…I don’t miss changing them once they’ve gotten rusted to the point where Schwarzenegger wouldn’t be able to budge them. I always ended up with one spike that I could never change. I’ll take spikeless any day.

      Reply

      Dave R

      1 year ago

      Totally agree. The one thing I do miss about metal spikes is the crunch they’d make walking across a cart path or any other similar surface. Not great for the spikes, but pleasant to my ear for unknown reasons.

      Reply

      JSGXXX

      1 year ago

      Great to talk about the Vokey wedges (AGAIN, yawn!) but what is the average to low-budget brands that are performing well and suitable for the mid/high handicappers that won’t see a huge difference in spending hundreds on the latest Vokey?
      Let’s hear about more Value for Money brands

      Reply

      Scott

      1 year ago

      understand what you are saying about the soft spikes over the metal ones. I have worm them all and my open is that the metal ones seem to be a little better to me. People still need to learn how to walk on greens. I see some of them twisting their feet on the greens and that makes it worse. That’s one thing that I couldn’t understand why they do that.

      Reply

      Jim Richter

      1 year ago

      Question. Is it worth considering moving away from hybrid and going to a 7 wood. Senior golfer 16 handicap. Play 3 x a week in Midwest. What hybrid would a 7 wood normally replace in my bag. I have 3,4,5 hybrids now and a 5 wood

      Reply

      SV

      1 year ago

      It depends on gapping and whether you are more comfortable with a fairway wood or hybrid. With a 5 wood & 7 wood I would think you could replace at least your 3 hybrid and maybe the 4 also.

      Reply

      Will

      1 year ago

      I think the Maxfli in yellow, is the best yellow ball on the market!

      Reply

      Golfinnut

      1 year ago

      Are the hybrid spikes available for purchase? If so, where?

      Reply

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