7 Reasons Why Range Balls Shouldn’t Be A Part of Your Next Fitting
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7 Reasons Why Range Balls Shouldn’t Be A Part of Your Next Fitting

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7 Reasons Why Range Balls Shouldn’t Be A Part of Your Next Fitting

Don’t get fitted for golf clubs using range balls. It’s something we say all of the time. To some extent, the reasons are obvious. Even if you’re not immediately aware of the performance differences between a range ball and premium offerings, you’ve almost certainly figured out that range balls feel hard as rocks, are uncomfortably loud off the driver and are often in trash condition.

Save the occasional uncomfortable water carry where risking a Pro V1 just doesn’t make sense, most of us would never think of playing golf with a range ball.

So, at the risk of asking the obvious: If you don’t play golf with a range ball, why would you get fitted using one?

an image of Pinnacle practice/range balls

The idea that you should get dialed in with the ball you actually play is exactly why we recommend you get fitted with the ball you play. When that’s not possible, we’d suggest using a ball that’s like the one you play. And, yeah, if it happens that a range ball is like the ball you play, we’d politely suggest getting a new ball.

Of course, we understand that it’s one thing to tell you not to get fitted with range balls and another to explain why. So, to help clarify things a bit, we included a popular range ball in our recent ball test. The Pinnacle Practice balls we tested are among the most popular (if not the most popular) range balls on the market. The balls we tested were in new condition which is probably better than the range balls used in many fittings. To an extent, our data represents the best-case scenario for range-ball fitting and it’s still not good.

Here’s a list of reasons why you shouldn’t get fitted with range balls.

1. Range Balls Spin … A Lot

Really simply, the range balls we tested (Pinnacle Practice) spin more and, in some conditions, a lot more than the urethane balls in our test.

Let’s start with the driver. Across the three swing speeds we tested (85, 100 and 115 mph), the range balls spun about 250 rpm more than the average ball in our test. To put this in context, 250 rpm is in the ballpark of what we’d expect to see from adding a degree of loft. Effectively, the range balls we tested would make a 9.5-degree driver spin like a 10.5.

With irons, the spin differences are bigger still. I’d classify them as massive.

For the slowest speed we tested, the range balls produced about 600 rpm more spin off an 8-iron than the average ball (and a Pro V1) and 1,200 rpm more than the lowest-spinning ball we tested (Bridgestone Tour B RX).

At mid swing speed, the range balls produced more than 1,000 rpm more spin than the average ball and nearly 1,800 rpm more than the lowest-spinning ball (TaylorMade Tour Response). To put this in terms many of you can understand, the Pinnacle Practice balls spun 1,100 rpm more than a Titleist Pro V1.

Finally, at the highest speed we tested, the range balls spun 1,100 rpm more than the average ball, more than 1,800 rpm higher than the lowest-spinning ball (Vice Pro Soft) and 1,200 rpm more than a Pro V1. That’s an absurd amount of spin; more than we’d expect to gain by swapping our 8-iron for a 9-iron.

Now imagine you got fitted into a set of irons based on spin numbers that were 1,000 rpm (give or take) more than you’ll experience on the golf course with a real golf ball. Your real-world results are going to be wildly different and likely very disappointing.

2. Range Balls Fly Differently (off irons)

Somewhat surprisingly, there’s nothing particularly concerning or abnormal in the ball flight of range balls off drivers. Looking at key trajectory metrics like launch angle, peak height (the highest point in a ball’s flight) and peak height distance (how far down range it reached that height), and descent angle (the angle at which it returned to the ground), the Pinnacle range balls we tested fall right in average range for all of the above. With allowances for the spin differences we’ve already covered, I suppose you could argue that getting fitted for a driver using range balls isn’t the worst thing. That’s not to say it’s a good thing but it’s certainly better than getting fitted for your irons with range balls.

Why is that?

Off irons, range balls fly low

At slow swing speeds, it’s just a few feet but for higher swing speed golfers, we’re talking more than 10 feet lower than the average ball. I realize that, over the course of a golf ball’s trajectory, 10 feet doesn’t sound like much but we’re talking about peak height that’s a bit more than 10 percent lower than average.

Range Balls Peak Sooner

We would say that ball that reaches its peak height farther downrange has a penetrating trajectory while the ones that reach that height sooner are somewhere between high and ballooning. Range balls likely qualify as the latter.

For slow swing speed golfers, range balls reached peak heights five yards closer to the hitting area. For mid swing speed players, it was nine feet and for high swing speed players more than 10 over the average ball (and 20 feet sooner than the latest peaking).

On percentage, it’s an appreciable, though not massive difference, but it’s one more thing that illustrates the differences between range balls and the balls you (hopefully) play.

3. Range Balls Are Shorter

This first part might surprise you. Because range balls are relatively firm, they’re typically every bit as fast as Tour balls. So, even with their higher spin, the higher speeds helped keep the range balls we tested in the average to even slightly above average range for driver distance.

As we’ve already seen, the bigger differences are found with irons.

At slow and mid speeds, the range balls are about four yards shorter than the average ball. At higher swing speeds, the distance gap creeps above seven yards.

In iron fittings, distance is typically a secondary consideration but it’s one more point to reinforce the idea that there’s enough difference between range balls and real balls that getting fitted with range balls isn’t really getting fitted at all.

4. Range Balls Don’t Spin Off Wedges

Full-swing spin numbers with wedges will typically mirror what you’ll get with an iron. A ball that’s spinny off your 8-iron is almost certainly going to be spinny on a full wedge. Get closer to the green, however, and things change.

a graphic showing the difference in spin between a premium ball and a range ball off wedges

On 55-yard wedge shots, the Pinnacle Practice balls spun about 800 rpm less than the average ball in our test and nearly 1,300 rpm less than the highest-spinning ball (Inesis Tour 900).

We know the realities here. Most of you aren’t going to get fitted for your wedges but, if by chance you do, definitely use a premium golf ball. A range ball won’t come close to representing what you’ll see in the real world.

5. Range Ball Aerodynamics Are Not Optimized for Performance

When golf companies design a dimple pattern for a premium ball, the objective is to optimize trajectory based on the performance characteristics of the golf ball. We’re talking about things like how high it flies, where in the flight it peaks, etc.. For example, for lower-spinning soft golf balls, dimple patterns are often designed to produce higher trajectories and steeper decent into greens which helps offset the lower spin.

Not that range balls do crazy things in the air but at least be aware that optimization of ball flight is often a secondary concern. The primary goal is durability. They need to withstand thousands of shots.

6. Sound and Feel Are Trash

the thick outer cover (pictured) is just one reason why you shouldn't get fit with range balls.

As I mentioned, the Pinnacle Practice balls we tested are firm. The compression is on par with the majority of “X” balls in the market. Most golfers would describe that as firm. When paired with thick, hard covers, the sound implications of range balls are amplified.

Literally.

If you’ve followed along with me over these last several years, you know I’m not one to obsess over feel but range balls are louder and generally more unpleasant-sounding than any ball you should reasonably play. Getting fitted with a range ball can make a perfectly acceptable club sound and feel worse than you’re willing to tolerate. Before you spend any money, you’d probably like to know how a club is going to feel on both well and poorly struck shots. In that respect—in most any respect—range balls won’t tell you what you need to know.

7. Range Balls Are Often Beat to Sh*t

Once a ball is turned loose on the range, there typically aren’t any quality standards. Visit most any range and it’s pretty clear that nobody is actively trying to remove the damaged balls. Dimples wear, covers cuts and gouges … so what? Even a small amount of damage can impact golf ball performance so if you absolutely must get fit with range balls, make sure they’re in good condition.

A Word About Launch Monitor Normalization

If there’s a silver lining in all of this, it’s that some launch monitors have ball mapping/normalization features built in to their software. Normalization takes the data you get from a range ball and runs it through an algorithm designed to tell you what a real ball would have done under the same impact conditions.

To some extent, normalization features allow you to get a reasonably decent fitting even when range balls are the only option.

It’s important to understand that normalization can work but, even with a number of ball profiles, it relies on some generalizations that don’t fit every model. For example, balls that might typically be classified as Firm Premium cover a wide range of spin properties, many of which don’t fit the generic profile. If your fitter is well-versed in ball mapping, he can probably get you close.

Ultimately, leveraging a normalization feature is better than getting fit with range balls alone but not nearly as good as getting fitted with the ball you play.

Whenever possible, using the ball you play during your fitting, especially when getting fitted for irons or wedges.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Andrew the Great!

      2 months ago

      “A Word About Launch Monitor Normalization
      If there’s a silver lining in all of this, it’s that some launch monitors have ball mapping/normalization features built in to their software.”

      Can you tell us which ones? In particular, I have Rapsodo’s MLM.

      Reply

      Hopp Man

      1 year ago

      When going to indoor fittings, whether paid or not, I do bring my own balls and use them for testing. I went to a free Golf Galaxy fitting for Callaway Paradym woods and hybrids, told them what ball I played, and they went and got that ball and put a tracking dot on it for Trackman. At a previous GG fitting the fitter told me to use the Titleist Pro V1 RCT as that was the “best” ball for Trackman. Now I don’t normally play a Pro V1 and they were fine, but I also didn’t really care for what that fitter was saying and fitting me for. I didn’t feel like he really knew what he was doing, but it was a chance for me to hit a brand of clubs for free in a Trackman bay. I certainly wouldn’t get fit using range balls, be like hitting rocks.

      Reply

      Stewart Craig

      1 year ago

      I would love to see a test comparing different manufacturers range balls to see the differences. We have done our own very limited testing but would like to see who makes the best range ball, performance wise. Especially the price companies are charging for them these days

      Reply

      Imafitter

      3 years ago

      I keep telling people not to get fitted at a big box store, as the person fitting you may have been flipping burgers at his last job, and the balls used in their fitting ranges are pure junk. The only training these employees get are 2-3 minute videos, which basically tell you very little about actual fitting. They are told by the manager to sell, sell, sell…PERIOD. No one WALKS without a purchase.

      Reply

      Dave

      1 year ago

      This isn’t always the case! I was fit at the PGA Tour Superstore local to me, and the person who fit me was a PGA Professional. Who had a degree in golf management from UNLV! I think having a conversation with a fitter first is always important! I had a club pro that I was taking lessons with at the time wanting to fit me into something I didn’t like, and was so arrogant he told me that I should just buy them and stop worrying about a name looks feel or sound! He’s a rep for the clubs he was trying to push down my throat! Plus these big box stores ALL have Pro’s and offer lessons. You can select the Pro to do your fitting!

      Reply

      Alan

      3 years ago

      Good article! When I’m at the range I only focus on quality of strike, and left to right dispersion. Distance control and yardages with range balls are a waste of time

      Reply

      mizunocorgi

      3 years ago

      Do most big box fitters like Edwin Watts and Club Champion allow you to bring a dozen of your gamer ball when you go in for a fitting?

      Seems like spending money on the fitting without hitting your ball would be hella dumb.. I’m bringing my own damn balls when I finally go to get fit for my first set of totally new irons.

      Reply

      Imafitter

      3 years ago

      I know a Club Champion manager and i can tell you they definitely know what they are doing, and fit you the right way. Some balls they use are specific to the electronic equipment, and I wouldn’t be concerned.

      Reply

      Eric

      3 years ago

      I just got fitted yesterday (3 wood), they used Pro V1’s (I use RB 566v) and had a couple range balls as well, mostly good quality. I had my golf bag in the car. Kept thinking I should run out and grab some of my balls to try out the club I decided to buy before I paid but thought, Nah that would be weird. Thanks for the article, from now on I am going to put one of my balls in my pocket before I go in to look at a club.

      Reply

      Eric

      3 years ago

      This ‘Fitting’ bull is an industry created initiate to generate store and merchandise spending! Drives me nut to see Guys who can break 90 go spend hundreds of dollars getting ‘fitted’ for stuff such as launch angle or spin. Having the proper shaft lengths and lie angle are useful for extremely short or tall people however this can be done with a yardstick & a chart for free. If you consistently shoot low 70’s or better you can find some value in a few of the fitting outcomes.. otherwise your just wasting you money when you should be spending this money on a lesson or spend this wasted time out chipping & putting! Funny how gold survived 20+ years ago without all this hype and guy still shot low scores.

      Reply

      Andy

      3 years ago

      If people getting fitted for golf drives you nuts, then this is clearly not the website for you. Maybe find a different church to preach to.

      Reply

      JW

      3 years ago

      You’re wrong.

      Reply

      Drew

      3 years ago

      Not going to disagree with lessons and practice. But getting fit helps you optimize your game. If people don’t practice their short games, or get lessons, it’s the best thing they can do to shoot better scores.

      Reply

      Imafitter

      3 years ago

      Sounds like you got your clubs at Walmart! Fitting is important, regardless of your height. Lies, lofts, shafts, lengths, cast/forged, types of irons, grips…it is all important.

      Reply

      Andrew the Great!

      2 months ago

      Do you get fit for shoes? Do you even bother to look at the size of the shoe before you buy it? Do you buy any pair of pants that looks good, or do you check to see the waist and length first?

      QED

      Reply

      Cale

      3 years ago

      Can you clarify the difference (if any) between a “range ball” and a “practice Ball” i have been buying packs of TaylorMade TP-5x “practice balls” and i cannot tell the difference from a true TM TP-5x. everything i read on site says the TP-5x practice balls are the exact same ball but with paint defects. Have you been able to confirm this? Sorry if the answer is elsewhere on MGS.

      Reply

      Tyrant Rex

      3 years ago

      When I got fitted at GolfTec they used Mizuno RB Tour balls. They wouldn’t be my first, or even second choice if I had one, but they were certainly better than some trashy Pennacle range galls or the like. Using decent golf balls did give me a little more confidence in the fitting (which turned out perfect for me).

      Reply

      Andrew

      3 years ago

      I would never get fitted using range balls and this is good advice without even needing the analysis portion of the article. It’s a no brainer.

      I hit some range balls in the simulator at PGA Superstore this week. I hit the Titleist T100 7 iron and the new Jaws high toe 60 degree wedge. Pure strikes with both using these range balls were spinning in the 3,800 range. Simply not possible in real life.

      Reply

      Charles

      3 years ago

      I’d be curious to see data from range balls on grass vs tour balls on mats indoor and see which is closest to tour balls on grass. I agree it’d be ideal to get fit outdoors on grass with your fitted ball, but that’s not a realistic option for us. So would love to see comparison of the 2 options available to us and see which is the better option … or maybe you guys find that both are horrible in which case Club Champions and the like should all close down lol.

      Reply

      Robin

      3 years ago

      I wish you did or have the numbers on wiffel balls?
      Because I practice with them every day in my net .
      Only tie them because I live in suburbs.

      Reply

      Big Guy

      3 years ago

      Given the range ball is a constant, isn’t the fitting experience of testing different irons/clubs the relative factor? That is, if Iron A gives x Spin, y launch and z distance and Iron B does it a bit better with the same ball type really what we are trying to understand?

      I think initial fitting with a range ball is more beneficial than hitting a premium ball in a SIM. You get better feel for the club and the dynamics it puts on a ball. Once something is chosen, fine tuning it on course with a demo club and your chosen ball is the only way to truly tell if it suits. .

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      The problem is that the differences between a range ball and a top tier tour level ball are significant. You can’t be optimally fit to a range ball and “fine tune” equipment with small adjustments.

      You might be able to make some comparisons between different clubs, but that’s a different objective than getting equipment dialed in to YOUR performance specs.

      Reply

      Big Guy

      3 years ago

      Chris, agreed. and you and I – like a lot of the MGS readers – are probably the type to do a lot of of ‘fine tuning’. If you are anything like me, I seem to always be fine tuning!

      The thing is, that for the vast majority of golfers, getting any fitting is important and the consideration that a Range Ball is way less than ideal could cast a shadow on the sort of fitting that a lot of people will likely recieve.

      Erik

      3 years ago

      This article was very helpful in explaining how a range ball flight and spin differ from say a Pro V1.

      Well done and thanks!

      Reply

      Duane

      3 years ago

      Why waste resources on testing range balls when any sensible person would not actually play with them? I thought the latest ball testing was great but there’s probably a ton of golfers using two piece balls that were completely left out of the process.

      Reply

      chrisK

      3 years ago

      I agree. But the MGS folks just don’t like to even talk about them much. I know i’ve found a Titleist Trufeel ball works incredibly well for me (and i wouldn’t have thought it except a playing partner gave me a sleeve to hit on a tight golf course). I guess it didn’t qualify for the test since it didn’t have a urethane cover.

      Reply

      Chris Nickel

      3 years ago

      Ball testing is a major endeavor and it makes sense to start with the highest performing (aka tour level) balls on the market.

      Beyond that, the list of reasons any golfer should play a 2-piece ball is incredibly short. If the objective is performance, then there is no reason any golfer would play a 2-piece ball.

      The fact that many golfers do use lower grade balls is likely evidence that golfers might not completely understand the differences between different types of balls.

      Duane

      3 years ago

      Replying to Chris Nickels response to my original post,
      I would like to ask if mgs is only catering to the lower hc players in what they test, since in the real world us amateurs are closer to mid to high handicappers. I thought that mgs was to benefit all golfers and that’s why someof the tests and reviews include “value “ products for those of us not blessed with the talent or deep pockets of some.. if there was only a market for the higher performing balls why is every ball mfg producing the less expensive 2 piece ball. There has to be a tremendous demand for this segment of balls to be profitable enough for them to produce them and I would say that testing them would be of great benefit to a larger percentage of your audience.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      3 years ago

      Duane – to an extent I understand what you’re saying, but Chris is right, there is no performance reason for a golfer to play a 2-piece ball. I think it’s probably a stat that surprises a lot of golfers, but premium urethane offerings are the top-sellers in nearly every ball manufacturer’s lineup. Inarguably there is a market for lower priced golf balls, but when we focus on urethane/”premium” offerings we are, in fact, speaking to the largest percentage of the market.

      It’s perhaps notable that when Titleist fits for golf balls, the menu is limited to Pro V1, Pro V1x (including Left Dash), and AVX.

      Even beyond the ball category, there are conflicts to be found between what golfers want and what offers the best performance. So speaking for ball manufacturers the choice is one between speaking exclusively to the performance-driven consumer and leaving money on the table, or offering up low price (2-piece) offerings that prioritize preference over performance. And that’s the reality…once you move into the 2-piece category, performance becomes a much smaller part of the conversation.

      I don’t begrudge anyone – especially higher handicap golfers – for wanting/needing to be judicious in how they spend on golf balls, but, with allowances for how any of us defines ‘value’, I think many who buy 2-piece offerings would be better served by buying quality DTC brands (Snell, Maxfli, OnCore, Vice, et.c.) in bulk to drive costs below $30 dozen or buying high quality used balls from a reputable seller. A barely used Pro V1 at sub-$20 a dozen is going to offer considerably better performance than a similarly priced (or even more expensive) 2-piece/surlyn-covered ball.

      Harry P

      3 years ago

      I am a bogey golfer that uses a urethane ball, usually Z Star, and with promos always pay less than $30/dozen. Much more important to me to have a 40 yard pitch over sand stop on the green than it is to maybe save $1.50 for some lost balls.

      Duane

      3 years ago

      I understand where your coming from regarding performance in that a more expensive 3-5 piece ball should out preform a 2 pc ball. Looking at the last ball testing, which I greatly appreciate, in the slow swing speed the left dash is the longest ball off the driver, 5th in ball speed, but not in the top 5-10 of iron testing orwedge spin. I would venture to say that I could find a 2 pc that matches or exceeds the performance of distance if that is what I’m looking for. Some want iron and wedge spin over distance and so they sacrifice some aspect of performance however large or small the difference may be I guess what I’m saying is that If I’m looking for distance and there’s a 2 pc that provides it I would love to know, same as if I’m looking for spin and would have liked to see testing on this segment of balls versus testing of range balls..
      Thanks for your hard work and your commentary

      Reply

      Barry

      3 years ago

      Obviously a trade-off for wedge fittings. Outside to test on grass (with range balls) and in the bunker (where I could use my own golf balls) vs. indoors off of mats but with premium balls and no bunker testing. What is recommended for wedges since I cannot get tested off of grass with premium balls?
      Thanks

      Reply

      Meyersp

      3 years ago

      I was at a local pro shop with a range and they had a Topgolf system that normalized the range ball for a “real” ball. I asked how accurate was that normalization. They told me it was accurate.

      I wondered and therefore I’ll ask here, is that possible? If this normalization is possible, then can a fitting with range balls be normalized to a particular golf ball.

      I agree, it is better to use the actual game ball. And hitting at a. range is better than in doors.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      3 years ago

      Normalization requires a bit of a broad generalization. In a perfect world, the fitter has tested every ball and has mapped it to the most equivalent mapped ball option.

      But again, it’s a generalization. For example, the operator has the option to map the range ball to a Firm Premium ball. The idea is to match the speed, trajectory and spin characteristics.

      It’s better than nothing, but it’s not like all “firm premium” balls have similar properties. I can show you low flighing firm balls and high flying ones. There are high spinning and low spinning firm balls too. And that’s before we get into the aerodynamic differences which mapping can’t account for with any degree of specificity.

      Normalization assumes that all balls of a given type (Premium, Firm Premium, etc.) have the same or at least similar flight/spin characteristics, but that’s not remotely the case.

      Basically, mapping is better than range balls alone, but it’s definitely not a substitute for using the actual model you play.

      Reply

      james blake

      3 years ago

      I’ve also heard don’t get fitted with irons off mats because of the change in spin rate and launch angle. So what’s the solution? I don’t know anyone who fits outside without range balls. Inside you can use normal balls but your spin and launch angles are messed up.

      Reply

      David Terrie

      3 years ago

      All obviously true, but around here, there is no place to get fitted with good/your own balls unless you are indoors. Wedge fitting off grass, nope. The guys at 2nd Swing did a test where they found a 7 iron to fly/spin similarly. I got fit for my irons in a Trackman bay where you hit range balls out onto the range. They should arrive any day now. Crossing my fingers.

      It must be said, however, that when I grew up there was no such thing as a fitting. You just got some clubs and figured out how to make them work. The same is true to a great degree today. There’s no such thing as a perfect bounce/grind for your wedges, and your irons are going to fly like they’re going to fly unless you purposely flight them up or down. All new 34 degree irons spin and launch about the same. Some are more forgiving than others. The driver is another matter, though, where dialing in launch and spin can make a huge difference.

      Reply

      Pete

      3 years ago

      I haven’t seen Pinnacle balls at a range for ages. The ones I’ve seen have been either Srixon at the large multi level range or just a mish mash of all sorts at the smaller range.
      What would the Srixon balls compare with?

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      3 years ago

      I don’t think anyone knows with absolute certainty but the general consensus is that the two most popular range balls on the market are the Pinnacle practice and the Srixon one-piece offering (because they’re dirt cheap).

      Assuming it’s a one-piece, I would wager performance is even further from a ‘real’ golf ball. Might be a fun test down the road.

      Reply

      Tim

      3 years ago

      anyone who uses range balls outside of the range…..is not a golfer…..sorry…..

      Reply

      Rob T

      3 years ago

      Wow, I’m a 15 and play them occasionally when they’re new. 2 rounds a week average, and I actually consider myself a golfer….

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      Yes, an extremely cheap one. Buy some real balls and stop embarrassing yourself.

      Mike

      3 years ago

      Totally agree. I have a bunch of new range balls that I’ll take out in the winter when absolutely no one is around and use them as practice balls. If they get lost, or I hit one so bad I don’t feel like walking to pick it up, so what? But on the course in the real round, get serious!!!

      Reply

      Everardo

      3 years ago

      I’ve been able to bring my own in the past, which is something people can try.. Which is another reason for indoor fittings, trying to eliminate the most variables when testing is ideal. So while it may not be ‘your’ ball at least it’s way more consistent than range balls.

      Reply

      Everardo

      3 years ago

      I’ve been able to bring my own in the past, which is something people can try.. Which is another reason for indoor fittings, trying to eliminate the most variables when testing is ideal. So while it may not be ‘your’ ball at least it’s way more consistent than range balls.

      Reply

      Jorge

      3 years ago

      I whole heartedly agree. From the numbers I have been tracking, my driver with range balls (at sea level) has been around 220, with comical movement… then I tee’d up a Wilson Duo Soft+ (yes, a Wilson Duo Soft+, deal with it) and hammered one out to over 260, on the screws, dead straight. So I even saw bigger gains than the MGS testing.

      Reply

      Steve S

      3 years ago

      Great article. May add one other note. Don’t get fitted for irons indoors or off a mat. Get fitted off grass. I hit my irons almost one club longer off mats. Looked at impact and I’m not hitting the mat first so I’m not getting an assist from the mat. Maybe the grass is getting between the ball and the face?

      Reply

      Lynyrd

      3 years ago

      I’m sure not the first to ask; it would be interesting if you tested different range balls.
      I cut a part a Pinnicale, Stratus, Srixon, Srixon-Marathon, TaylorMade, and Wilson. The cores vetoed quite a bit in appearance.
      Certainly agree with not using Range balls to be fit, but I believe it would still make for an interesting one-time test.

      Reply

      Damon

      3 years ago

      I got fitted for PXG last week and this was brought up by the fitter at the beginning of the session. Luckily we werent using Pinnacle range balls and it was at Tiburon Golf Club in Naples, home of the Shark Shootout (whatever it is called now). Little bit better Callaway ball, but distance differences and performance was factored into the discussion the entire session.

      Reply

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