Ball Lab – Vice Pro Golf Ball Review
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Ball Lab – Vice Pro Golf Ball Review

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Ball Lab – Vice Pro Golf Ball Review

This article was updated in May 2023 to ensure product availability.

MyGolfSpy Ball Lab is where we quantify the quality and consistency of the golf balls on the market to help you find the best ball for your money. Today, we’re taking a look at the Vice Pro. An overview of the equipment we use can be found here. To learn more about our test process, how we define “bad” balls and our True Price metric, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

a photo of the 2020 Vice Pro golf ball

Given the nature of direct-to-consumer business, we can’t be absolutely sure but it stands to reason that Vice is among the most popular brands in its segment. It’s fair to say its balls have been among the most requested for Ball Lab.

You asked for this one.

As it turns out, we bought our samples of the original Vice Pro just before the new models came out. Rather than publish data on an out-of-date model, we decided to wait until we could get the new models for comparison. With COVID messing with the supply chain, it took us a while.

We’re caught up and that means the Vice Pro has the distinction of being the first ball for which we have two generations’ worth of data in Ball Lab. So, in addition to our standard Ball Lab metrics, having a bit of history allows us to compare quality across generations and see where things have improved, devolved or stayed the same.

About the Vice Pro Golf Ball

Price of the Vice Pro golf ball

As you can see, not a whole lot has changed between models. Like the original, the 2020 Vice Pro is a three-piece performance golf ball with a urethane cover. It’s manufactured by Foremost in Taiwan and features the 318-dimple design common to many Foremost-made balls. It’s the same pattern used on the OnCore ELIXR we reviewed earlier, though we should note that the latest generation of Foremost-made balls features thinner covers. That should lead to more greenside spin and, indeed, that’s among the benefits listed by Vice.

Results from our 2019 Golf Ball test suggest the Vice Pro golf ball is a mid-launch, mid-spin ball. We expect that will carry over with the new model given that the Vice Pro is positioned to compete against the Titleist Pro V1.

Vice Pro Golf Ball – Compression

a chart showing the compression of the Vice Pro golf ball

Vice is sticking to the formula that works. With respect to compression, the new Vice Pro is, for all intents and purposes, unchanged from the original. At +/- 86 compression, it lives in the sweet spot where speed lost to compression is absolutely minimal while providing a bit softer feel than a healthy percentage of the “Tour” category.

If you’re looking for a direct point of comparison, the Vice Pro sits between the Bridgestone Tour B XS and the Srixon Z Star which are likely the two softest balls in play on the PGA TOUR.

Vice Pro Golf Balls – Diameter & Weight

Vice golf ball diameter chart.

As the Ball Lab database has grown, we’ve come to understand that quality typically begins and ends at the factory level. While there can be some variance between models—for example, low-compression balls tend to be less consistent than high-compression balls—for the most part, we have a good idea of what to expect from balls coming out of any given facility.

Foremost does an outstanding job with size so it’s not surprising that we had no issues with diameter across our Vice Pro samples.

  • None of the balls in our sample failed to meet the USGA minimum size requirement.
  • None of the balls in our sample failed to meet our standard for roundness.
A weight chart for the Vice Pro golf ball

Suffice it to say, weight is an area where Foremost sometimes struggles. We certainly saw that with the original Vice Pro.

  • In our sample of the 2016 Vice Pro, 17 percent of the balls we measured exceeded the USGA weight limit (and flagged as “bad” accordingly).
  • With the new Vice Pro, we’re happy to report that all of the balls conformed to the USGA’s maximum weight specification.

Vice Pro  – Inspection

An inspection chart for the Vice pro golf ball.

Centeredness and Concentricity

Again … speaking to patterns … while Foremost excels at making balls all the same size, the layers aren’t always evenly distributed. In every case where we flagged a ball as bad, it was because of a significant concentricity issue with the mantle layer, the cover or both.

While off-center cores are easily recognizable, the experts we’ve worked with in developing our Ball Lab standards agree these seemingly small inconsistencies in the outer layers will often have a more significant performance impact than cores that are slightly off-center.

In total, 11 percent of our 2020 Vice Pro sample was flagged as bad. That’s a modest improvement over the prior generation.

the core of the 2020 Vice Pro Golf ball

Core Consistency

Core color was consistent across both the 2016 and 2020 samples.

Cover

We found no significant issues with the Vice Pro covers. Foremost’s cast urethane process appears to produce few meaningful defects.

Vice Pro Golf Ball Consistency

In this section, we detail the consistency of the Vice Pro across generations. Our consistency metrics provide a measure of how similar the balls in our sample were to one another, relative to all of the models we’ve tested to date.

A consistency chart for the vice pro golf ball

Weight Consistency

  • As mentioned, weight is an area where Vice’s factory tends to be a bit inconsistent.
  • Both the 2016 and new 2020 Vice Pro models rate as “fair” (below average) relative to the other balls in our database.

Diameter Consistency

  • As noted, Foremost is typically above average when it comes to diameter consistency.
  • That holds true here as both versions of the Vice Pro were rated on the higher end of the average range.

Compression Consistency

  • The compression of the 2020 Vice Pro was significantly more consistent than the prior generation version.
  • The compression range of the 2020 Vice Pro sample was just over nine points, compared to 13 points with the previous model.
  • Zero balls were flagged for having a compression value that deviated significantly from the median ball in the sample

True Price

True Price is how we quantify the quality of a golf ball. It's a projection of what you'd have to spend to ensure you get 12 good balls.

The True Price will always be equal to or greater than the retail price. The greater the difference between the retail price and the True Price, the more you should be concerned about the quality of the ball.

Vice Pro Golf Ball – Summary Report

To learn more about our test process, how we define “bad” balls and our True Price metric, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

A ball summary chart for the Vice Pro golf ball.

The Good

  • Overall, quality appears to be better than the previous generation
  • The Vice Pro is a solidly average quality ball priced below the market leaders.

The Bad

  • Concentricity issues are problematic, though likely not out of the realm of what’s tolerable considering the price (especially if you buy in bulk).
  • Weight consistency is still below average.

True Price

The True Price of the 2020 Vice Pro is $39.36. That’s 13 percent above retail and significantly better than what we found with the prior version (True Price $50.39, 44 percent over retail).

Vice Pro Golf Ball – Retail Price and Options

The Vice Pro golf ball is available in white, neon lime, neon red, drip lime and drip red. The standard retail price is $34.99. However, per-dozen pricing is as low as $26.99 when purchased in quantities of five dozen or more.

Ball Lab Top Performers

Want to know which balls have performed best in Ball Lab testing so far?

Check out:

Vice Golf Balls: FAQs

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

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      Philly Jeff

      10 months ago

      I don’t typically join these discussions but I usually rely on My Golf Spy for top notch feedback. I’ve used the Vice Pro for the 1st time 2 weeks ago and the results were immediate and made me regret not playing this ball years ago. Tremendous ball flight and feels great with the wedges, too Even off the face of my Metal X Odyssey it felt like a slight click which felt great. After my 2nd and 3rd rounds, I shot 81 and 77 with my first even par 9 hole back nine. Will never play another ball other than Vice Pro again.

      Reply

      Corey

      2 years ago

      Would love to see a ball comparison of direct to market only balls. I’m a Snell guy with 3 years of use and I revisit that decision every year, so far haven’t made a change. Although, Vise has tempted of late, I will stay in the direct to market ball category for the foreseeable future.

      Reply

      James

      3 years ago

      I’m using Vice Pro Plus for the last 3 months. It seems to be playing with ProV1x for me. Most of all, it goes the same or a little further than ProV1x with a swing speed of 98 and half-price of ProV1x. I’ve played with Srixon Q (bad), ZX, TP5x, Chrom Soft (not for me), Snell, and Inesis Tour 900. Vice Pro Plus is very close to Inesis Tour 900. It could be from the same manufacturer in Taiwan.

      Reply

      Pete

      3 years ago

      Never understood the interest in Vice balls. Why? Many websites in the US and UK offer 2019/20 versions of Srixon, Bridgestone and Taylormade tour balls for the same price as the Vice Pro. But these are played by a bunch of Tour Pros with many wins on Tour including majors. And one has to order 5 dozens from Vice to get their best price whereas from these other suppliers you sometimes get that from the first dozen or you have to opt for multi buy but that is never more than 6 dozens.
      Guess the choice should be easy between no name balls from Taiwan vs proven tour balls when the price per ball is the same.
      Vice feels like ‘the emperor with no clothes’ to me.

      Reply

      Austin

      3 years ago

      They’re popular because they’ve tested remarkably close to “premium” balls in every category, in basically every comparison done on YouTube and other sites. They’re also much cheaper. No other “premium” or tour manufacturer structures their prices the way Vice does either. I would never bulk-buy TM or Titleist. Pros playing a brand of ball is not a good reason to buy a golf ball. I switched to the Vice Pro from the TP5 after testing the VP because they feel and perform very similarly, and I’m saving money.

      Reply

      Thomas Fore

      3 years ago

      No doubt Vice is making good balls and ProV1s are way more expensive.. But it is not just Titleist out there on Tour. Plenty of Bridgestone, Srixon and Callaway balls played by e.g. DeChambeau, Morikawa, Woodland, Lowry, Rose, Kaymer, Bradley, Rory, McDowell and many more. Just checked thegolfshoponline here in the UK and you get e.g. a Srixon Z-Star way cheaper than the Vice Pro. You just have to choose the multi-buy option of 6 dozens but best price at Vice is for 5 dozens; so should be no real competition for most golfers.

      Mike

      3 years ago

      Where exactly can I get brand new, in the box, 2020 model OEM premium balls at half the original price? You sure you don’t mean the 5A mint condition balls? I follow prices extensively and have never seen 20/20 Bridgestone or TaylorMades for ~$24 a dozen. Help MGS readers out and please post the websites! And what’s the aversion to buying balls in bulk? Who buys one dozen at a time unless you’re a very occasional player, and if you are, you’re probably not playing premium balls.

      Reply

      pete-A

      3 years ago

      Is this the beginning of testing 2nd generation balls? Like Titleist have release a new Pro V1 and Srixon have released new Z Star versions, will you be going back to compare?
      I can imagine you have enough on your plate anyway Tony.

      Reply

      MBU

      3 years ago

      I bought the Red Pro +, and they play just as good as the other premium balls. However, when I’ve hit a few wedges the inner layer shows through as white which makes them look really old quick.

      Reply

      P.J.

      3 years ago

      I’m confused, in the Con’s, it says: Weight consistency is still below average. Followed by: Both the 2016 and new 2020 Vice Pro models rate as “fair” (below average) relative to the other balls in our database.

      But in the article it says “None of the balls in our sample failed to meet the USGA minimum size requirement.” and “With the new Vice Pro, we’re happy to report that all of the balls conformed to the USGA’s maximum weight specification”.

      Does that mean there balls that were under the minimum or too large a variation between them? If so, which is it?
      So….how is the weight consistency below average for the 2020 version?

      Reply

      TR1PTIK

      3 years ago

      Obviously, your question is best addressed by Tony, but my understanding is that he is talking specifically about weight consistency being below average.
      Just because a ball model meets USGA specs does not mean that it is consistent throughout the range of balls tested. His determination of fair, average, good, etc. would be based on how other samples of balls performed.

      Reply

      CD

      3 years ago

      Can you comment on the weight consistency? How much was the difference?

      Reply

      Cesar Marques

      3 years ago

      Well done Tony, it was about time you touched upon the Vice Ball and the comments are just as great. And to Carolyn, the call can also be to Korea and several places in China if you want to start your own brand of performance urethane balls.. The idea of a single comparison chart is also useful and to those wondering how important these “bad” really are……not much. I used to play the more expensive balls and I could never tell the difference. The more I play the lower my scores get is the ultimate truth.

      Reply

      LABillyboy

      3 years ago

      I’d love to see research into ball performance based on number of holes played with the ball. I was using a PV1 last weekend that now has 90 holes on it, only a couple scratches but it’s ben hit by a 110 MPH driver, what? 70 times? It just seems to fall out of the air at this point off the tee. Watching high speed video of balls being hit, the deformation seems like it would ultimately affect the balls integrity. I’d love to know when I need to relegate it to the shag bag….⁰

      Reply

      ChrisK

      3 years ago

      I agree. Brand new Titleist Pro V’s are awesome, then you play over a couple of 18-hole rounds and i definitely start seeing reduced Driver performance. And i’m not a beast by any means; i swing driver about 100 mph. I’ve always thought it was because the cover just doesn’t maintain a slick and shiny surface, but it’d be nice to know if that’s what it is.

      Reply

      Carolyn

      3 years ago

      Would it be safe to say if you wanted to start a golf ball company a phone call to Taiwan can get the ball rolling?

      Reply

      Andrew

      3 years ago

      Another great article and interesting findings. The only question, as a reader that I feel need to be answered is what measurable impact does a ball classified as ‘bad’ have on performance?

      For example, hit 10 shots with an Iron Byron using the same ball, repeat with an entire batch/box. Then upon completion cut the balls to identify if any would be classed as ‘bad’ and compare the performance results.

      I think the differences, if they exist would give greater weight to the ‘true price’.

      Reply

      Paulo

      3 years ago

      Tony , firstly great article but why did you do a comparison to previous models for reliability etc and not on previous ball labs for other manufacturers?

      Reply

      Stevegp

      3 years ago

      Thanks, Tony. I really enjoyed the thorough review and it was especially interesting to see the comparison between the two versions. I appreciate the effort you make in producing these reports.

      Reply

      James

      3 years ago

      I have been waiting for this ball test. My takeaway is Vice is a middle of the road ball. If you are willing to buy in bulk, it’s a good deal. I am a 15 hcp and play the 2016 version. They work for me (especially given I am prone to lose a few per round). I am going to re-up with the 2020 model this offseason.

      Reply

      Mj

      3 years ago

      Maybe that is why you lose some balls per round. Every one is two strokes. You could be single digits if you used a better ball.

      Reply

      James

      3 years ago

      Funny. I don’t think the ball has much to do with me hitting it off the heel or the fact I putt like a blind squirrel.

      Mike

      3 years ago

      So if he used a better ball like a pro v1, as a 15 index, his ball wouldn’t get lost? I find that very hard to believe., Actually, boiling on the ridiculous. Unless there are pro v1’s out there that have an anti-hazard repelling mechanism that will also chirp to me when I can’t find it.

      Paulo

      3 years ago

      I think the fact the squirrel is blind might make them a better putter, takes out the visual element of doubt . I think you meant ‘a squirrel with heathy sight’ ?

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      My friends who won’t pay $49 for a dozen pro v1’s buy these all day long at about half the price when they buy 5 dozen. Plus, the neon green seems to be real easy to find.

      Reply

      Bill

      3 years ago

      Any way we could get a list of which balls are made at which factories? MGS has better info than the standard golfer/consumer. It would be great to see this, especially since so many DTC balls are made at common sites. In the end, I typically play Srixon and Titleist, but always open to a change if they produce a quality product at a good price.

      Reply

      Jamie

      3 years ago

      Would love it if you could put all the ball test in a table so it is easy to compare ball to ball.

      Also, a suggestion for a future test would be the impact on ball flight consistency of bad balls. If you were able to identify bad balls before they are cut (float them or xray) and then compare against a good ball and test using a robot what that bad ball does to dispersion.

      If I was able to identify all the bad balls in a dozen Vice and I could throw them away leaving me with only good balls then the “real cost” per dozen would be an important metric for me. But the fact is every time I tee up a Vice, or a number of other balls not made by Titleist or Bridgestone, I am running a significant risk that the ball is defective and could result in bad shots from good swings.

      Reply

      Jim P.

      3 years ago

      This is a great idea. If you could show the results of a “bad” ball, you could provide some concrete evidence for all the naysayers saying “all the balls all the same.” For me, just not knowing is enough to lose confidence, but some people don’t care unless they see it.

      Reply

      Jamie

      3 years ago

      If a “bad ball” results in 10% larger dispersion then many people might be ok with it. If bad ball means 30% larger dispersion that is a different story. I need a Strokes Gained metric for good versus bad ball.

      Maybe for the next Ball Test they can number ever ball and track the result of every ball. After the test they can cut all the balls open and determine which are bad. If Vice ball 7 and 21 are bad then you compare the results of those two balls against the results of the good Vice balls. Super easy! I’m sure it wouldn’t take long.

      Sam

      3 years ago

      So if the balls are made in the foremost factory in Taiwan with a standard dimple pattern, where is the German engineering? I do like to see that comparison between years. Anyway to do that with the old ChromeSoft line?

      Reply

      Brian

      3 years ago

      I suspect that they have input into the compression, cover material, core materials, layer thicknesses, etc. The dimple pattern appears to be the only thing common among Foremost’s B2C customers. I would suggest that these factors combined would be considered engineering… Somewhat!

      Reply

      TR1PTIK

      3 years ago

      This one was fun Tony! Like seeing everything side-by-side like that.

      Reply

      Tim

      3 years ago

      Tony, can we get the new costco ball soon? v2 of the 3 piece in the red box?

      Reply

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