Is Walking Really Better Than Riding?
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Is Walking Really Better Than Riding?

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Is Walking Really Better Than Riding?

Does walking the course really burn more calories than riding? We all know that it does. The better question is how many more calories does walking burn? For some of us, this is an important question because we are trying to be more active. Most MyGolfSpy readers will agree that the ideal fitness plan for summer 2022 involves playing more golf.

Could getting fit this season be as simple as bypassing the cart barn?

Research Shows …

As I said, most of us know that walking 18 holes requires more energy than riding in a cart. Scientists have published peer-reviewed articles proving just that.

The graphic above comes from an article in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (Murray, et al, October 2017). You can see how the various forms of golf are ranked by Metabolic Equivalency of Task (MET) score. As expected, riding in a cart is an easier task than walking with your bag on your back or pulling/pushing a cart. Surprisingly, the study reported that using a pull cart required more effort than carrying the clubs on the back.

I would not have predicted that. How could pulling the bag take more energy than carrying it? After digging a bit into the reference papers, I discovered that previous research reported that the golfer’s heart rate was higher when pulling the clubs than when carrying them.

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Riding, Pushing and Remote Controlling

After reading those papers, I wanted to explore the calories/golfing value myself. Obviously, riding would burn the fewest calories. That wasn’t the source of my curiosity. The genesis of wonder was the Motocaddy M7 remote control cart that had recently arrived in my garage. Its arrival begged two questions.

First, how would the calories burned using a remote-controlled cart compare to a riding cart? Second—and less obvious—how would the calories expended using a remote-controlled cart compare to using a traditional push cart?

Data Collection: Whoop 4.0

The final piece of the puzzle was realizing that my Whoop 4.0 strap could record heart rate-based calories during play. Unfortunately, completing this project would also require me to play golf. The sacrifices I make for science …

Data was collected during three rounds of golf in November 2021. All three rounds were played at the same course. Weather and course conditions were similar. The same equipment, including clothing, was used during all rounds. No, I didn’t even switch out my putter. I even drank the same amount of water and ate the same snacks. Sadly, I also abstained from beer and bourbon during play.

As I mentioned above, calorie data was recorded using the Whoop 4.0 strap. Before each round, I made sure the sensor was fully charged and that my Readiness score was in the optimal green range. Check out my review of the Whoop 4.0 to find out more about how Readiness is calculated.

The Whoop sensor uses your heart rate to calculate calories. This personalizes the calorie count based upon your actual exertion. Many fitness apps just use a height/weight/age-based algorithm to calculate calories.

Whoop Data: Riding Cart

I walk most of my rounds so riding in a cart was a treat. Due to continuing COVID protocols, I was alone in the cart. Again, what a treat. Since I was by myself, it was easy to zip from shot to shot. Like I said, I usually walk this course so it was fun to see how it plays from a cart.

Subjectively, I had a feeling that the calories-spent number would be low. The feeling of fatigue that I feel after walking 18 holes wasn’t there. I wouldn’t say that I felt fresh but I could have driven to the first tee and given another round a go.

Whoop Data: Walking – Motocaddy Remote-Control Cart

For the remote-controlled round, my clubs traversed the course on a Motocaddy M7 remote control cart. My initial hypothesis was that using the remote-controlled cart would be a combination of riding and pushing. I was very curious about the calorie output as none of the fitness apps that I use has a remote-controlled cart as a play option.

Truth be told, I think I had more fun with the Motocaddy than I did than my riding round. It’s been a while since I’ve used a remote-controlled cart and I’d forgotten how satisfying it is to just send the cart down the fairway and then stroll unencumbered behind it. My stride was longer and more balanced when I no longer needed to push the cart. My guess is that this is how the pros—and fiscally fortunate amateurs—feel when they have a human caddie.

That round really felt like the proverbial walk in the park. The fact that zipping the cart into the tee box area elicited giggles from my group was an enjoyable bonus.

Whoop Data: Walking – Clicgear Push Cart

walking better than riding

Pushing my clubs in my usual style of play. My Clicgear 3.5+ probably has 300 rounds of wear on its three tires. I have the pushing-my-clubs situation all dialed in. Nothing is unexpected or surprising. It’s golf as usual.

As such, playing this round did not elicit a feeling of “fun” but I would say I was more relaxed. Having everything “normal” in terms of transporting my clubs allowed me to essentially ignore that part of the round and focus on my shots. Yes, this can be a bad thing, depending upon the flavor of the swing that round.

Post-round fatigue was normal. Shot range between birdie and triple was normal. Nothing unusual to report.

Confirmed: Walking Uses More Calories

Unsurprisingly, riding in the cart required fewer calories than either walking-based strategy. I think we all knew that was going to be the case. That said, I did find the difference between walking and riding, and Whoop’s reported calorie numbers, surprising.

When we compare the walking and riding numbers, we see that walking the course requires about 30 percent more calories per hour. I expected this number to be much higher, especially since it was closer to a 50-percent difference in expenditure in the paper I cited above.

Riding in the cart required more calories than I thought. Thinking it through, we all know that driving a car for a long time can be tiring. Go ask a FedEx driver how fresh and lively they feel at the end of their route. Driving takes energy. So does driving the golf cart.

I was also surprised to see that using the Motocaddy remote-controlled cart burned seven percent more calories per hour than the push cart. This seemed impossible until I remembered Whoop uses a heart rate-based calorie measurement.

Though I don’t have the data, I would bet that my walking pace was faster using the remote-controlled cart. As I walk quicker, heart rate elevates a bit so more calories are burned. Pace quickens when pushing is not requires. Admittedly, this is speculation that requires further exploration.

I feel like this could be a “reps versus amount of weight” situation. Do you burn more calories lifting 10 pounds five times or 50 pounds once? As I said, this is something worth exploring. More data is needed.

Whoop Data Versus Other Apps

Though I should have expected it, I was surprised to see the low calories-spent values reported by Whoop. I’ve used the fitness/diet tracking app Lose It!™ for a few years and one of the best things about entering golf as an activity is that it is worth a bunch of calories. For example, when I enter the push cart round into Lose It!™, it says that I burned 346 kcal/hour. That is roughly triple what Whoop reported.

As the Whoop also reports lower calories-burned than my Peloton does, I was not surprised that the number for golf was lower than the app. To have it be only one-third of the calories was shocking. So much for a round of golf nullifying the round’s liquid calories.

The Lose It™ app did have one other data story worth reporting. When comparing the walk versus ride values in the Lose It!™ app, the difference was once again about 30 percent. The overall calories-burned values may be way higher in the app but the walk/ride differential is similar to what I found when measured with the Whoop.

Walking Burns More Than Riding

Walking the course with a push cart or a remote-control cart will burn about 20 to 30 more kcal per hour than riding in a cart. While this is not as large of a difference as I expected, the calories will add up quickly. The difference per round will be more than 100 calories and would end up in the thousands over the course of a year.

If you are really looking to make a difference in your fitness this year, it’s these little gains that make the big gains possible. If that’s not enough to motivate you, most courses charge walkers less to play. At my course, the riding fee is $18 a round. For the avid golfer, even an expensive walking option like a Motocaddy remote-controlled cart will essentially pay itself off in a season without cart fees.

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Dave Wolfe

Dave Wolfe

Dave Wolfe

A putter-obsessed recreational golfer, constantly striving to improve his game while not getting too hung up about it. Golf should be fun, always.

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Dave Wolfe

Dave Wolfe

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      Warren

      1 year ago

      I appreciate the article but you all you really need to do is look at the BMIs of golfers who ride vs those who walk. It’s painfully obvious which burns more calories. I will admit there’s probably a lot of self selection ie: those who aren’t active are, I am going to guess, much more likely to ride. Since being ambulatory is a key factor in longevity, I am going to walk as long as I can.

      Reply

      Eric

      2 years ago

      Its still shocking to me the data suggests a motorized cart is somehow exerting more, albeit tiny, than pushing the actual clubs. This goes against logic a bit. It would probably be worth diving into the max heart rate that occurred during the motorized caddy round that read the 151 rate, which might have jumped heart rate up overall. Especially on a hilly course I’d imagine the push cart is significantly more calories than motor caddy.

      Reply

      Alejandro Gomez

      2 years ago

      This is an amazing read, I was higly surprised at the amount of calories burned while driving. I myself personally feel that I play a lot better when I walk than when I ride; not sure if its a mental thing or the fact that I keep the heart rate going makes me feel more freely and smooth. Thank you so much for such a great article. The sacrifices we so for Science!!!!

      Reply

      Ian Harris

      2 years ago

      I think the results of your test are fairly obvious. My question would be this… What did you shoot? I’ve played thousands of rounds walking, with a cart, walking with a pushcart. Both tournaments and non-tournament. I score lower riding a cart.

      Reply

      Durk

      2 years ago

      A late respone, but calories as the single metric to measure if something is ‘better’? We know that carrying a somewhat heavy load is what keeps our muscles, bones and nervous system on par (no punt intended).

      There is much more to it than calories.

      Besides, we know for a fact sitting too much is killing us. That fact alone makes riding worse than walking.

      Reply

      Vinicius

      2 years ago

      Great article, thanks!
      One thing struck me, though. I also use the whoop 4.0 and my numbers are much higher! 1628 calories for a 5hour golf activity (round + 30min range session). Closer to your Lose It! numbers.

      Reply

      Bas

      2 years ago

      I don’t think I’ve ever seen a cart on a golf course in The Netherlands. They’re parked next to the shop, but they are only meant for people who are disabled.

      And it would have been nice to have sees the difference between carrying and pushing.

      Reply

      Steen Rabol

      2 years ago

      How about your golf score?

      Reply

      Steve

      2 years ago

      Trying to understand the science that has the remote control cart use burning more calories than a push cart. Data seems flawed or a cause/effect/control missed. Maybe it’s the Whoop device? By any measure pushing weight while walking the same distance should burn more calories than just walking and not by a small amount.

      Reply

      RC

      2 years ago

      It “might” have something to do with the fact that swinging your arms burns more calories than them not moving at all when you’re pushing a cart. Before I got my electric cart, my Garmin watch would barely count my steps, because my arms weren’t moving. Now, it’s counting every step as I walk with a longer stride with arms swinging. Also, moving faster burns more calories than moving slower. A push cart doesn’t allow you to walk at as fast a pace as you can with nothing holding you back. Those are just guesses, but could account for the discrepancy.

      Reply

      Jim James

      2 years ago

      Thanks for this article; very interesting stuff. However, as a certified Grammar Asshole, I have to point out that the sentence “Its arrival begged two questions” is actually a very commonly misused phrase. The sentence should say “Its arrival *prompted* two questions.”

      The correct usage of “begs the question” is in response to statements that suggest logical fallacies or faulty premises. “Begs the question” is often used interchangeably with “raises the question;” however, some grammarians argue they are not synonyms.

      Reply

      John Jacobs

      2 years ago

      i THINK THE MOST DISCOURAGING FACT IS THAT CARTS HAVE NOT EVOLCED, CHANGED OR ADAPTED SINCE i WAS A KID. tHEY ARE AWFUL ON THE LOWERR BACK.. nO ONE HAS EVEN THOUGH TO DESIGN ONE THAT CAN SUPORT THE HUMAN BODY, ESPECIALLY OVER ROUGH TERRAIN.
      wHAT I IN THE WORLD IS THE MATTER IN FAILING TO DESIGN CARTS BETTER. iT’S ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO BELIEVE HOW CONSISENTLY BAD THEIR DESIGN IS. – joHN

      Reply

      Phillip

      2 years ago

      I have a remote controlled cart and was surprised by the results. I will continue to use my remote cart in spite of what I read here where it burns the most calories. The main reason for my remote cart is to alleviate the strain on my 54 year old back that carrying a bag causes and that a regular push cart up massive hills at my club does to my lungs. Also with regards to pace of play, I find that having a remote cart and walking helps keep the group from constantly waiting on the group in front of me. We generally play in 3 1/2 hours in this format. If I am in a golf cart we’d be waiting on every shot for the group in front of us, because I’d be playing in less than 3 hours easy, if unimpeded by the group in front of us.

      Reply

      Ned

      2 years ago

      I find that 2 people walking can keep up with 2 people in a cart. Reason is the walkers each go to their own ball and play while the riders go to one then the other ball.

      Reply

      Jeff

      2 years ago

      Walkers ALWAYS keep pace with carts for the very reason you mention.. It’s a great fallacy that they don’t. The only time they “Fall back” is when there are looooooooong walks between holes.

      Reply

      Steve

      2 years ago

      Carts speed up play by at least 30 minutes … Take a cart course play is too slow …15 minutes running on the tread mill after or before your round gives you the extra burn without holding up play.

      Reply

      Kevin H

      2 years ago

      Sorry that statement on the face of it is just simply not true for the vast majority of courses and golfers. Have to realize there are far more bad golfers than good and when you are in a cart when people are spraying the ball and they have to drive all over the place it takes a lot longer than if each person could just walk to their ball.

      My favorite course is 6900 yards and I’ve walked it in 3 and a half hours no problem in a 4 some of walkers while in carts it’s taken slightly over 4 hours depending on who you are playing with which as a single is just a crap shoot.

      Reply

      GJ

      2 years ago

      Totally agree with this. Everyone should be riding. Let golf be about the skill and not the exercise. Everyone saves time.

      Reply

      Mike

      2 years ago

      Golf riding is a game, golf walking is a sport. Get your lazy ass out of that cart (if you’re physically able, of course). Walking is NO slower unless you have an empty course.

      Mike

      2 years ago

      No, get your lazy ass out of the cart (if you physically can).

      jeff

      2 years ago

      Nope. A BIG fallacy. Cart’s don’t speed up play. As a walker, I’ve been stuck behind foursomes with 2 carts more often than I can remember. Instead of going to your ball and being ready to hit, a bad cart will go to ball one and dawdle. And then go to ball two and dawdle. Rinse and repeat down the fairway.

      Reply

      Phillip

      2 years ago

      Then can you explain why St Andrews in Scotland publishes an expectation of 3 hours and 30 minutes per group for 18 holes where they’ve never seen a golf cart and everyone walks? Versus the expectation in the USA that a foursome should finish 18 holes in a cart in 4 hours and 30 minutes?

      Reply

      Jimmy

      2 years ago

      I don’t think St. Andrews is really the best comparison. That place offers a number of features that speed up play.. Unlike many public US courses, the tees and greens are close together. The fairways are wide and there’s not much water, so lost balls are at a minimum. When you do lose one, you have a seasoned caddie to help you find it and tell you what to do once you have. They also require an official handicap, which until 2020 was capped at 24!! (now 36) for men and 36 for women. Half of the people I play behind on any given Saturday morning couldn’t meet that threshold.

      That being said, I agree that walking doesn’t have to be slower than riding in most situations.

      TonyG

      2 years ago

      Your raw data is correct but not based in reality. We often play the same course with the same group of single digit handicappers. In the rare case where the weather is perfect and we have no one in front of use, we can walk the course in 3.5 hours and ride in 3. Reality is dictated by the golfers ahead of you. We ALWAYS keep up when walking. Several of us work on golf courses and can tell you that the slow groups are rarely walker

      Reply

      Mike

      2 years ago

      Interesting article but NO WAY in the world do I believe that merely walking next to a remote control cart burns more calories than pushing a metal frame cart, full bag of clubs, a dozen balls / other accessories,L & up to 6 water bottles (on a hot summer day) up & down hills on a ~7,000 yard course. THAT MAKES NO SENSE.

      Reply

      P.J. Evans

      2 years ago

      Interesting data – wouldn’t have ever guessed that walking with a remote control cart burned more calories than using a push cart.
      As for me, I walk because A) I need the exercise and B) I think I play/score better when I’m walking. How many times have you taken a pitching wedge and a putter with you, after missing the green, only to realize you really needed a Lob Wedge or something else? Countless times for me, but I almost never go back to the cart to swap the club out. I use what I have, so I don’t hold up play, and it almost always cost me a stroke. When you have a push/remote cart, I take it with me, right up to the green – no problem swapping out the club for the right one…

      Reply

      Jay

      2 years ago

      One thing I wonder. When you ride on a cart how does the fitness tracker not know you aren’t doing interval training and counting the cart ride part as the sprint? I know for a fact my phone app fitness tracker counts cart rides as steps

      Reply

      Richard

      2 years ago

      Because crummy fitness trackers don’t have gps and only track heart rate

      Reply

      Jonathan

      2 years ago

      How is the time duration almost the same for all three activities? Riding in the cart should be significantly shorter time for a round than walking, and I would think the motorized cart round would be shorter than the pushcart round (as supported by your statement about having a quicker pace).

      Reply

      Richard

      2 years ago

      It’s almost as if the duration of your round can be affected by having other people on the course??? Weird

      Reply

      RC

      2 years ago

      Really enjoyed this Dave. I was wondering about the exact same things you touched on. It would have been fun to include the actual steps count as well, because that’s what I notice most using an electric cart vs. using a driving cart. That step count varies every round of course, because your ball doesn’t land in the same place every round. I’ve noticed that my step count is just about double what it is when I take a cart on the same course.

      Reply

      Tony P

      2 years ago

      I’d like to see the same test done in July in the south. Come on down to Kiawah & do the walking (pushing a cart) in the heat & humidity & see what the differential is.

      Reply

      Franc38

      2 years ago

      I walk (carry) all the time, on my mountain course… except for “serious competitions” in which case I push my (non electric) cart. Honestly, the results more than surprise me as I do use the push cart in comps to avoide fatigue and keep more energy/mental acuity for the final holes (and clearly it does work: I’m not tired and feeling fresher at the end of 18 holes pushing than 18 holes carrying).
      Might be due to the “hilly” (to say the least) nature of the terrain, though.
      One thing is clear, when I do ride (quite rare), it’s like golf is really not a sport, just a game with very little physical demands compared to my normal walking!

      Reply

      Mike

      2 years ago

      Wow, totally agree, we’ve been saying for years that if you ride it’s a game, if you walk it’s a sport.

      Reply

      Rolly Junio

      2 years ago

      Awesome review. Found the remote cart stat interesting when you mentioned the higher heart rate. Thank you for the review.

      Reply

      Larry

      2 years ago

      Started playing with M 7 , I play 5 times a week ( Quebec ) it’s a plaisent walk , competitive ( 10/12 Andy cap) I am 78 do not want to ride .

      Reply

      Willie T

      2 years ago

      Not surprised at all in the data. I like walking, but it has been a deterrent of late as the course I play most charges the same whether you ride or walk. I plan to walk 9 more often as a deterrent to being a cart junkie. My Garmin S20 records all my steps – on a bad day (where I am all over the course or it’s wet) I can be upwards of 12,000 steps. On a boring day (like today hit the ball pretty straight)just over 8,000. Those are cart numbers. I do a lot of leaving the cart parked even when it’s okay to ride the fairways. Walking will definitely place me consistently at the upper end of the step count. All that to say, if I have time to walk I am going to.

      Reply

      Dan

      2 years ago

      Calories isn’t the only metric that matters. How about the way walking helps your blood pressure? That’s a big one.

      Reply

      Steve S

      2 years ago

      I walk whenever the course is not too hilly(subjective) or too hot(also subjective). One time I won’t walk for sure is when they charge you full price walking or riding. Many courses around here (central Ohio) have started doing that since walking became more popular during Covid. I think it BS but since the golf courses are busy I guess they feel like they can get away with it.

      Reply

      Will A.

      2 years ago

      I’d be interested to see if there’s a significant discrepancy between caloric expenditure for driving a cart versus riding in a cart.

      Reply

      Tony P

      2 years ago

      Probably depends on who is driving the cart….

      Reply

      Hacker Bill

      2 years ago

      The real advantage is in the volume. If you only play once a week it probably doesn’t make that much of a difference walking verses riding. But if you play 3 to 5 days a week the volume of walking and MET piles up and can make a real difference in your health..

      Reply

      Tau

      2 years ago

      I discovered a. long time ago that the most energy expended, by far, is playing when it’s cart paths only. I sometimes walk 50 or more percent extra compared to just walking..

      Reply

      TripleB

      2 years ago

      Good information here. I recently went to a powered cart as it had the benefit of allowing me to walk still and relieved some stress from my lower back issues. Interesting that you found more calories burned using the powered cart though. I personally feel much more relaxed after a round of just walking compared to push/pulling a cart.

      Reply

      J-Full

      2 years ago

      Those Whoop numbers look way off. I’ve been a whoop user since 2020 and my golf strain numbers are way higher than that. I had the old whoop and also have the 4.0. Idk your body type, but I’m 5’11 225. I’m considered overweight, but you cant see my belly through my shirt and if the light hits right you might see an ab. Ladies call me “huskular”. But I burn around 1400 calories during a 3 hour range session with whoop but my average heart rate is usually in the 140-150 range. When I golf in a cart my heart rate is usually in the high 120s to low 130s. I’d probably check your profile information to make sure that you have the proper data entered in terms of gender, height, and weight.

      I get similar calorie and heart rate numbers from my whoop as I do from my peloton hr monitor. But in both articles I’ve read where you discuss whoop, your numbers look way different than most folks I know with Whoop

      Reply

      JRambo

      2 years ago

      Not positive, but I believe individual strain numbers have a lot to do with an individual’s resting heart rate.

      Reply

      Scott

      2 years ago

      I am not trying to be funny or condescending or anything. I am concerned about your well being if your heart rate is that high during a range session or while playing golf with a cart. You should see your doctor right away to discuss this and you might need to see a specialist.

      Reply

      Matt B

      2 years ago

      Been look at push carts to start walking more and this may seal it for me. Or you could send me that motocaddy for “testing” lol

      Reply

      Andrew the Great!

      2 years ago

      I suspect the FedEx driver is tired at the end of the day not because of the driving per se, but because of the driving in traffic (something you don’t get when driving a golf cart), but even more so because of the repetitive in-and-out-and-back-in routine, plus the hauling of packages (another element you don’t get when driving a golf cart). Just my observation.

      Otherwise, I’d love to get me one of those remote-controlled “caddies”. Here in Puerto Rico walking is virtually nonexistent, in part because of the lengthy green-to-tee designs.

      Reply

      Emery

      2 years ago

      As a MGI ZIP Navigator remote user, I concur your findings! Less lower back stress than push cart, faster walking pace, carry adequate rehydration/ice for hot months than push or carry. Carry was easier than push for me and stopped using one a yr ago (SunMnt). Old knee injury would get aggravated after a weekend carrying so made the remote caddy investment instead of new irons this season. Best decision for me and my health.

      Reply

      Bradley Ransom

      2 years ago

      I golf at high altitude and really notice a difference from carrying to a push cart. I even loose a few irons and other stuff from the bag when knowing I will be slogging up hill in some places. So I’m kinda suspect of the findings

      Reply

      Shaker

      2 years ago

      No beer or bourbon invalidates this survey.

      Reply

      Rockstar Leo

      2 years ago

      I take it this was on a reasonably flat course? In terms of feeling tired after 18, I do find that it’s only a small difference between cart and walking on flat courses.

      Would be interesting to make the same experiment on a hilly course with more ups and downs. There’s one course like that here, and whenever I invite friends I warn them if they are going to walk, it’s quite a workout. I would bet this creates a wider gap between walking and cart; and would be interesting to see push cart vs remote controlled.

      Reply

      Ken

      2 years ago

      I would have liked a comparison to carrying, too. It is interesting that your max heart rate for riding and pushing are similar.. I would guess your golf course is fairly flat.

      Reply

      Tanner Mathis

      2 years ago

      Great stuff. When dad & I played 10 days in Scotland almost 5 years ago, I tracked this activity on my Apple Watch Gen 1. While not the Whoop, I was shocked to see how many more calories I burned walking with an automatic cart & playing over there vs riding stateside. It’s made me want to continue walking while playing.

      Reply

      Bryan

      2 years ago

      Interesting results. I’ve been a walker with pushcart for ~10-years, which I’ve enjoyed, but switched to a remote control cart (Club Booster v2 connected to a CaddyTek 3-wheel cart) last year. I can’t imagine going back. Walking without the exertion of pushing a cart really increases my enjoyment of the round – at least when I’m playing well! The nerdy-ness of remote controlling a 3-wheel swiveling cart doesn’t hurt, either.

      I am surprised the Whoop measures more calories burned with the remote control cart vs. push cart. My energy level at the end of a round with a remote control cart is dramatically higher than a push cart. That’s especially true when the course is hilly. Maybe that makes a difference?

      As always, I appreciate the writeup, MGS.

      Reply

      Terry

      2 years ago

      Dave, it would be interesting to see how these results would compare to walking while carrying your clubs.

      Reply

      Matt

      2 years ago

      Yes, let’s get that added in to the mix! I don’t use pull carts when walking as i find it an extra hassle instead of just doing my thing with the bag as I always have. Eventually, I could see going remote control and just walking as I get older. Or the golfboard! Would the “stoke” overcome the fatigue? I think that would make a good follow up article as well.

      Reply

      Barry Schwartz

      2 years ago

      Interesting data. I prefer walking, not because I burn more calories but because I feel more in touch with the course and my game. The pace and tempo are more uniform and there seems to be more time to plan your next shot as you are approaching the ball. Maybe it’s because I grew up playing walking golf.

      Reply

      See you at 19th

      2 years ago

      exactly how I feel on the ride v. walk. Walking allows me to focus and stay in the zone, I find driving distracting. Whenever walking is available, that is my choice. My views on golf have evolved over time (I listen to music now)and drink occasionally), so this may change too. To me is about having fun, playing good golf and experiencing something enjoyable, whatever that means to you.

      Reply

      largechris

      2 years ago

      You’ve touched on it in your report – the Whoop data is hopelessly inaccurate for calculating calorie use, it’s just measuring heartrate. Might as well try to deduce calorie use from measuring how long your hair is.

      I’m the first to acknowledge that fitness trackers are useful, the stuff the Apple watch can do is super impressive, but the tech isn’t there to measure what you’re trying to measure.

      Reply

      Tony P

      2 years ago

      I’m a Whoop user & I’d like you to explain your comments for fully & use facts

      Reply

      Largechris

      2 years ago

      Not sure how I can put it any simpler. It is measuring heart rate. Not calories burnt.
      If Whoop are claiming they can measure calories burnt (which is nonsense), it’s for them to prove it, don’t you agree?

      Rich

      2 years ago

      The Whoop band is actually quite accurate. It knows your height/weight/age and based on that information when you add exertion, which is your heart rate, it can calculate your calories burned. I’m not sure how you would measure calories without that data or what you think would measure it more accurately?

      Ray

      2 years ago

      Good write up thanks

      Reply

      Greg

      2 years ago

      I’m 73 and play golf on a hilly golf club. Most time I push a cart and on occasion will ride back nine or 18. On a hot humid day when I’m pushing a cart according to my I watch will burn up to 1,500 active calories and 2,000 total calories. The only thing that changes is the weather and when the heat goes up so does the heart rate and calories.
      On this course riding is substantially easier followed by remote electric carts followed by carrying and most difficult is the push cart. I was surprised how much easier to carry a light bag. If it wasn’t for my arthritic knee I would carry.

      Reply

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