Ball Lab: Titleist Velocity Golf Ball Review (2022 model)
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Ball Lab: Titleist Velocity Golf Ball Review (2022 model)

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Ball Lab: Titleist Velocity Golf Ball Review (2022 model)

MyGolfSpy Ball Lab is where we quantify the quality and consistency of golf balls. Today, we’re reviewing the 2022 Titleist Velocity. To learn more about our test process, click here.

Before we dig into our Velocity Lab, some quick housekeeping: We know you’re all looking forward to seeing the 2023 balls tested. To get a broader sample of what you’re likely to find at retail, we space out our orders, which means it takes six to eight weeks or more from start to finish. That process is  underway and we hope to start sharing our findings in the next few weeks. In the meantime, we’ve still got a little 2022 inventory to work through.

About the Titleist Velocity

a photo of the 2022 Titleist Velocity golf ball

The Titleist Velocity golf ball is designed with a singular purpose. At $29.99 per dozen, it’s one of two Titleist balls with a sub-$30 price point (TruFeel being the other). It’s classified as a high-launch, low-spin ball which is common for two-piece models.

Titleist Velocity Construction

The Titleist Velocity is a two-piece golf ball with an ionomer cover.

The Velocity is produced alongside TruFeel, Tour Soft and Tour Speed at the company’s Ball Plant 2 in North Dartmouth, Mass.

Compression

a closeup of a Titleist Velocity golf ball

On our gauge, the 2022 Titleist Velocity has an average compression of 84. That places it alongside the Bridgestone TOUR B XS and 2021 MaxFli Tour. It should be noted that, because of the ionomer cover, it’s going to feel quite a bit firmer than urethane balls of similar compression. For the sake of level comparison, other than the Pinnacle Practice, it’s the firmest ionomer ball in our database. In fact, the closest ionomer ball in our database in the 2020 TopFlite Gamer which measures a full 10-points softer.

Your takeaway is that the Velocity is an exceptionally firm golf ball.

Compression Comparision

We’ve had several requests for a standalone compression comparison tool. As it turns out, that tool already exists. We created as part of our Golf Ball Compression FAQ page. At some point, we may merge the two charts, but for now the plan is to include this chart in future Ball Labs.

Diameter and Weight

A Titleist Velocity golf ball measured on a diameter gauge

All of the balls in our samples were found to conform to USGA rules for size and weight.

Additionally, all of the balls in our Titleist Velocity sample met our standards for roundness.

Inspection

Centeredness and Concentricity

We flagged a single ball for a concentricity defect (significant variation in cover thickness). Otherwise, we found no serious issues within the sample.

Core Consistency

The core of the 2022 Titleist Velocity distance golf ball

Core color was generally consistent across the entire sample.

Cover

No cover defects were identified.

Titleist Velocity – Consistency

In this section, we detail the consistency of the 2022 Titleist Velocity. Our consistency metrics provide a measure of how similar the balls in our sample were to one another relative to all of the models we’ve tested to date.

a chart showing the consistency of the 2022 Titleist Velocity Golf Ball

Weight Consistency

  • At the time of testing, weight consistency for the 2022 Titleist Velocity fell on the higher end of the average range.
  • Box 1 was slightly lighter but, generally speaking, the sample met expectations for consistency.

Diameter Consistency

  • Diameter consistency also falls in the average range.
  • Based on the average diameter of the balls in our sample, we’d classify the Velocity as a “large” ball.

Compression Consistency

  • Compression consistency rates within the average range.
  • The compression delta across the sample is 9.5 points
    • That’s slightly higher than we’d expect from Titleist but better than most ionomer-covered balls.

True Price

True Price is how we quantify the quality of a golf ball. It's a projection of what you'd have to spend to ensure you get 12 good balls.

The True Price will always be equal to or greater than the retail price. The greater the difference between the retail price and the True Price, the more you should be concerned about the quality of the ball.

Summary

To learn more about our test process, how we define “Bad” balls and our True Price metric, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

The 2022 Titleist Velocity is an average quality ball relative to the market as whole and above average relative to the other ionomer-covered balls we’ve tested. It’s well-suited for budget-conscious golfers looking to maximize distance off the tee.

The Good

  • Average quality relative to the market as a whole
  • Above average quality compared to other ionomer balls

The Bad

  • One ball with a significant concentricity defect
  • A single layer defect in the sample

At the time of testing, the 2022 Titleist Velocity receives a Ball Lab score of 76. That’s three points better than the database average (73) at the time of reporting.

That works out to a True Price of $30.85, a three-percent increase over the $29.99 retail price.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Joe

      1 year ago

      I was given a dozen of the Titlest Velocity balls last week and immediately took them to the golf course.
      I am an older man who has a relatively slower swing speed. I found that these Velocity balls played long and relatively straight. But I also found that they do not hold the greens very well. They constantly rolled off the green no matter how easily I hit them onto the green.

      Reply

      Mike

      1 year ago

      Tried this ball out and found it to be very good off driver and very long off irons. Definitely a bit firm but very low spin made it difficult to hold greens even with a 6 iron swing speed of 88mph and normal trajectory. I could see this ball being very good though for quite a large segment of players, just not quite enough control for me.

      Reply

      e kurtz

      1 year ago

      Instead of a Compression quality rating (or in addition to), I would like to see the Quality Comparison Tool list the actual compression of the ball when tested. I see these values are listed in the written review, but it would be very helpful to have them all in one place in the Comparison Tool also.

      I know that compression values are an inexact science, but if MGS uses the same lab process to determine compression for each ball, there is a baseline consistency of sorts.

      Regardless, I always look forward to the next Ball Lab. Thanx for continuing to do them.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      1 year ago

      Hey E – That tool already exists, but it lives by itself as part of our Golf Ball Compression FAQ. You’re not the first to ask for it, so I’ve added it to this post and will include it in all Ball Lab posts moving forward.

      Reply

      RT

      1 year ago

      It’s a maybe ball but not yet ! Srixon, Wilson, ,Maxi balls are at the top in this class..

      Reply

      Harry

      1 year ago

      I dont buy balls as I find so many like new balls and these are common. I typically play pro v1 but I used these often through the winter and today actually. These are long off the tee and a lower spinning option so if Im slicing this day for some reason, Ill put the pro v’s away and use these. It spins but not like a pro v or multi piece ball and I have no problem getting it to check, but not getting lots of backspin. Good ball. But again, I dont buy them, just have dozens I found. I dont think I would pay the price they are asking for these but if you find one, try it.

      Reply

      Robin

      1 year ago

      I wish you would test any of the Saintnine balls they make several types of balls.

      Reply

      FBNG

      1 year ago

      Interesting that the older version scored higher. The velocity does come in a lot of colors, unlike the higher priced Titleist offerings.. Have played occasionally when I just wanted to experiment with a distance ball and could be bought as a logo over run for $2. Do go long – but no stopping power. Current ball is Vice Pro Plus – in my top 5 on Ping Ball Fitting App., which reminds me of the old golf ball selector app

      Reply

      Pete A

      1 year ago

      I love your site but I can’t understand how you can call these golf ball reviews. They are quality tests. It would be great if these reviews could also offer information on how the ball played, distance, feel, spin, etc.

      Reply

      Kyle

      1 year ago

      I agree. This, and other articles like it, are quality audits. Useful information, sure. Certainly helps identify what balls are worth the money when the MFG claims that quality justifies the money. But in terms of performance review, this isn’t that.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      1 year ago

      In Ball Lab, we *review* the quality of the golf balls tested.

      In our Robot Ball Tests (http://mygolfspy.com/best-golf-balls-2021/), we *review* the performance attributes of the balls tested.

      DaveyD

      1 year ago

      It’s a ball I wouldn’t consider, but I’m surprised by the relatively low (for a Titleist product) ranking. As we chug slowly to April 1 and the dropping of the new Snell balls, I’m more than a little curious about the testing results and pricing.
      Additionally, the Oncore Vero X2 has me intrigued, having successfully used the X1 the past couple of months.

      Reply

      Mike

      1 year ago

      Interesting review. I don’t use these balls but do find quite a few of them, so I know they’re popular. But it’s disheartening to see that a two-piece ionomer ball now retails for $30 a dozen.

      It will be curious to see in a few years if the cost of playing golf (& not just clubs) thins out the ranks of current players, especially all the covid-inspired folks who began playing during the pandemic years.

      Reply

      JB

      1 year ago

      It is $30 for Titleist two piece ball, not for all balls in that category. I found a new 24 pack of another brand for $9.99 on clearance at Target.
      I get what you are saying about Covid push in golf, but you can play expensive golf or you can play golf on a budget. That resides with the person. But let’s face it, golf ain’t cheap. If a person wants a cheap sport, this ain’t it and never will be and Covid didn’t help it with all the demand.

      I watch a certain YouTube channel where they shop thrift stores and flea markets. Seen them get someone started in golf with a few hundred dollars and have a really good set of clubs, bag, balls, gloves, tees, even shoes/clothes, etc., plus play at a muni for $25.
      Or a person can buy the “best” and be $5,000 into golf quickly, and join a private country club. It all depends.

      All about priorities.

      Reply

      League Golfer

      1 month ago

      These Velocity balls and the Titleist TruFeels were on close out at Walmart a month ago and they were selling them for $9.99 and $8.99 a dozen in white and all the colors. I stocked up, even though I find probably three or four” like brand new” golf balls for every one I lose or wear out.

      Reply

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    Drivers
    Jun 11, 2024
    Callaway Paradym Ai Smoke Ti 340 Mini Driver
    Putters
    Jun 11, 2024
    Triple Black Evnroll 38 Tour Spec Putters
    FootJoy limited FootJoy limited
    First Look
    Jun 11, 2024
    JUST DROPPED: FootJoy Red Clay Premiere Series