As PGA Tour-LIV Saga Endures, Fan Frustration is Turning Into Apathy
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As PGA Tour-LIV Saga Endures, Fan Frustration is Turning Into Apathy

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As PGA Tour-LIV Saga Endures, Fan Frustration is Turning Into Apathy

The priorities of the brave new professional golf world are perfectly clear. 

And the golf fan, you can be sure, is at the bitter end of that priority list. 

What other conclusion can be drawn after the events of the past two years and the past two weeks? The people who enjoy watching men’s pro golf have been worn down like an unchanged grip. 

In a recent MyGolfSpy Twitter poll with more than 7,000 votes, nearly 50 percent of golf fans said they would watch less competitive golf in 2024. They might be watching golf in other places but their collective desire to seek out the pro game could be waning. 

“Honestly, I enjoy watching many of the golfers on YouTube more than the PGA Tour,” wrote one commenter. “More personality and humor. Frankly, it is a more entertaining product than the PGA Tour.” 

Jon Rahm Bolts to LIV

Evidence for fan exhaustion might have reached a dystopian crescendo when Jon Rahm—seemingly one of the most thoughtful, affable and genuine characters in golf—donned a LIV Golf letterman jacket during last week’s appearance on Fox News to announce his lucrative deal with the disruptive circuit. 

In the months and years leading up to his announcement, Rahm had been an ardent PGA Tour supporter while outwardly objecting to LIV. He harshly criticized LIV’s format, pledged fealty to the PGA Tour, explained how more money would not fundamentally change his life and convinced everyone that he valued beating the best players in the world more than maximizing profit. He openly laughed at those who questioned his intentions or mentioned him in LIV rumors. 

Because of that, most followers of pro golf had Rahm in their top five for notable players most unlikely to depart for the LIV cash grab. Perhaps only Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy and Jordan Spieth could be considered ahead of him in those unofficial rankings. 

But during his television appearance, Rahm exchanged his trademark passion for a dead-eyed expression. He trotted out tired party lines like a politician and admitted that the money—reportedly somewhere between $300 million and $600 million—was a primary factor in his decision. A day later, Rahm ran a victory lap on “The Pat McAfee Show” as the interview revolved around two obscenely rich men talking about how one of them just got even richer. That the interview took place on ESPN, which has invested heavily into the PGA Tour through their ESPN+ platform, was a chef’s kiss moment. 

A week later, Rahm made it clear that his thoughtful voice would be silenced for the time being.

“I am under very strict instructions not to do public events,” Rahm told reporters in Spain. “There will be nothing until February. I’m not allowed to.”

It’s a huge loss for all of us not to hear Rahm speak freely. He was among the most entertaining and interesting press conferences in all of golf, but now it seems he has sold his freedom of speech in addition to selling his world-class skills on the course.

Can you blame Rahm? Yes and no. 

It must be hard to turn down that amount of money. He had the opportunity and he took it. Rahm leveraged the green jacket he won last spring, and his place as a top player in the world who doesn’t have to worry about major exemptions, for his own business interests. It is his right to do that. Potentially, Rahm could be cashing in and only have to serve a short suspension from the PGA Tour before the two leagues join forces and Rahm can play tour events again.

But Rahm is also the latest in a long line of important people who have prioritized their own business interests ahead of the greater good, causing professional golf to eat itself from the inside. Although Tony Finau announced his intentions of staying with the PGA Tour after speculation he would leave, it’s a virtual guarantee that Rahm won’t be the last to go to LIV. 

That has golf, already a niche sport with a relatively small audience, becoming more divided with two watered-down products. 

The biggest loser in all of this is the fans. And fans, it should be said, have been dismissed by the PGA Tour for years. 

How We Reached This Point

This whole mess started with the tour, a member-run organization with a mission to treat all of its players equally. The tour had long been overly protective toward the bottom two-thirds of its membership, its bloated structure being vulnerable but serviceable for decades. 

The value of the PGA Tour always rested with players like Woods, McIlroy, Spieth and other stars but the tour jerry-rigged its product to salvage a living for the rank and file. It was a matter of excess. In an attempt to feed too many mouths, the tour tried to sustain too many events, featuring too many players that fans did not care about. It was largely the reason they created the FedEx Cup Playoffs, a contrived and hamfisted effort to get more money to the best players while still taking care of everyone else. 

Even before LIV came around, the PGA Tour struggled to create an entertaining product. Its TV offering has long been drowned in ads and on-air sponsored content to the point of being borderline unwatchable. The golf itself is hit or miss but the misses are frequent and, until recently, the top players were not meeting enough. The tour sat on its hands in the innovation department, holding onto its archaic structure as long as possible. 

They could have adapted and created a better product around star players, one that would have been appealing to more fans. They didn’t, until it was too late. 

And even if they had innovated, the Saudi Public Investment Fund might have bulldozed them over anyway. PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan had the opportunity to pick up the PIF’s phone calls before that could happen but the tour stayed the course and opened itself up to the most embarrassing chapter in its history. 

PIF and its governor, Yasir Al-Rumayyan, came in with a bottomless pit of money and hunger to earn a seat at the table. Inserting an irrational actor into the professional golf marketplace artificially inflated everyone’s value, making it impossible for the PGA Tour to compete in an arms race.

LIV’s emergence was great for the players who took the money. It was great for the PGA Tour players who stayed and raked in large raises as the tour tried to counter. Others involved, like agents and caddies, also benefited in a major way. 

But on the whole, it has been worse for fans. 

LIV was instantly caught in the wasteland between serious competition and exhibition golf. Fans don’t care about how much money golfers make; they just want to be entertained by something genuine. LIV hasn’t resonated at all, drawing poor ratings that are just a fraction of the PGA Tour audience. Just finding the CW Network was a challenge on its own. 

Rahm joining won’t make any material impact. Of the top 27 players in Data Golf’s overall rankings, which include all players regardless of where they compete, he is the only LIV member. Even if they captured more top guys, LIV is not resonating with golf fans. Most close followers of the game have cared about the news and drama surrounding LIV but they don’t care about the competition. 

And while LIV flounders, spending an endless stream of money on a product not generating meaningful revenue, the PGA Tour has been bled dry by the PIF. The tour is missing a handful of its most interesting characters—Brooks Koepka, Bryson DeChambeau, Patrick Reed and Dustin Johnson included—further diluting a product that needed a facelift but received a punch to the face instead. 

That is why the PGA Tour and the PIF joined forces with a framework agreement this past June. It was a matter of survival for the tour. They were out of options. LIV would continue to poach players, as it has with Rahm, until a merger of some sort can take place. 

Whether that agreement goes through—the deadline is supposed to be the end of this month—will say a lot about professional golf’s future. 

Where Does Professional Golf Go From Here?

The optimistic take is that the PGA Tour and LIV will come together with the potential for a more global tour. The top players will compete against each other again, maybe in a more exciting format with a more palatable TV product. Middle-of-the-pack players will compete in a lower-tier league with the ability to play their way into the best events, along the same lines of the new PGA Tour model being implemented this year. 

The elite competitive game needs a hard reset, a complete reimagining of what it should be. 

But professional golf’s recent history offers little room for optimism. The stakeholders involved have been looking out for themselves. 

When was the last time professional golf made a decision that benefited fans? There have been small peace offerings, like commercial-free back nines for majors and better streaming options, but they are few and far between. While other leagues like the MLB and NBA have gone for radical changes that give fans a better experience, golf has rarely made an earnest effort to care about fans.

Greed has carried the day and golf fans have been abused because of it. The sentiment I continue to hear is that fans, once angry about the abuse, just don’t have the energy to care anymore. 

They will watch the majors and occasionally flip through channels to see the end of an exciting tournament. Many will spend more time playing golf instead of watching it. The true sickos will stay, their Stockholm Syndrome too much to overcome, but the masses can’t be blamed if they aren’t as invested as they used to be. 

There is a famous Elie Wiesel quote: “The opposite of love is not hate; it’s indifference.”

Apathy is spreading amongst golf fans. Professional golf deserves it.

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Sean Fairholm

Sean Fairholm

Sean Fairholm

Sean is a longtime golf journalist and underachieving 8 handicap who enjoys the game in all forms. If he didn't have an official career writing about golf, Sean would spend most of his free time writing about it anyway. When he isn't playing golf, you can find Sean watching his beloved Florida Panthers hockey team, traveling to a national park or listening to music on his record player. He lives in Nashville with his wife and dog (of course the dog's name is Hogan).

Sean Fairholm

Sean Fairholm

Sean Fairholm

Sean Fairholm

Sean Fairholm

Sean Fairholm





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      John Elliot

      3 months ago

      Great essay on the state of the pro game… its closing quote is spot on, like others, my anger, disgust and sadness, has morphed into indifference.

      Reply

      Mike Tisson

      4 months ago

      Rahm was always an overgrown baby, and now he has added liar and hypocrite to his resume. F that pos Saudi show horse. Hope they f’n chop his head off.

      Reply

      DblBgy

      4 months ago

      This article sums it up for me pretty well. As a golf fan I feel exactly like a worn out grip. I was perfectly content with the PGA and LPGA tour products and coverage. Too many ads? Maybe, but they are needed to raise the $$$. Too much focus on one or two “star players”? Yes for me, I would prefer seeing a variety of players. I watched a bit of a LIV tournament and the coverage really didn’t suit me. Too little screen space for the actual golf. I found the leaderboard and team logos along the left side of the screen annoying. And I really can’t get behind the team concept. What I find really disappointing is how Monahan et. al. have completely bungled the PIF/LIV situation. Did they not see this coming?
      Did they not play this out as a scenario when considering the long range plans and sustainability for the PGA Tour? They looked and acted completely surprised. Now one of my favorite sporting events, the Ryder Cup is in a mess further wearing down my grips. On top of all this, the obsession of the USGA/R&A with distance has worn my grips down even more. Personally, I like seeing PGA players going long and going low. I also like watching LPGA players remarkable abilities with hybrids and fairway woods. Both modes are enjoyable to watch. Because of technology I hit the ball in play more and further than I did 40 years ago and I very much appreciate that. If the new golf balls limit my distance then the game becomes less enjoyable for me. I will keep playing golf and enjoying time with my mates, but now I find myself caring much less about golf as a product. Consequently, I will likely watch less and buy less.

      Reply

      Ron Lee

      4 months ago

      Other than the majors, I don’t watch PGA events anymore unless you count having one on in the background when I’m doing something else. I have never watched an LIV event, and never will. Zero interest in the format, and frankly every big name that has jumped (including Rahm) has previously behaved in a way that made me think “this guy is kind of a dick”. With Rahm, for instance, how much freaking money do you need? After all your posturing about the format being invalid and more money not being a factor, he waits till he has his major exemptions and it looks like a merger in the future is guaranteed and grabs the cash. Like I said, kind of a dick. If and when the PGA/LIV merger happens, I will stop watching altogether.

      When I am watching golf nowadays and actually paying attention, it’s an LPGA event. As a 70 year old golfer who is never going to drive the ball 300 yds, their game is a lot closer to what I should be trying to do.

      I watch very little of the traditional sports anymore either. Baseball’s analytics-driven focus on hitting home runs has made it less interesting for traditional fans. Basketball’s focus on 3-pointers (analytics again) and lack of travelling calls (2 full steps after picking up your dribble to get behind the 3-point line, changing your pivot foot before you start your dribble, and at least half the “Euro-step” moves) have ruined that game. Even football, which arguably has the best visual product, has become a war of attrition, How many starting QBs and other skill players are out for the season? How many games last week had both teams struggling to score 10 points? Who wants to watch a contest where neither team can score? If I wanted to do that, I’d watch soccer. And call me old fashioned but I don’t think you need to celebrate every time you actually do your job successfully on the field. I miss the days when Tom Landry would bench one of his star players for spiking the ball after a touchdown.

      If the Saudis go after the LPGA next I may end up with curling as my only spectator sport.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      So you’re just a dirty old man like so many? lmao
      Where do you think the modern big money for the PGA Tour started? Would you give Eldrick Tont the credit for bringing the big money, or was that big money just due to the world being interconnected with the WWW and all that? Why does the PGA Tour need the big money at all in the first place? If the PGA Tour didn’t have any big money at all, would that be considered THE Tour to go to play for these players? Would they even show up if there was no money there but just a trophy?
      Gimme a break. They’re all showing up to the PGA Tour BECAUSE of the money. If they didn’t care about the BIG money, but were just content to make enough to have a house, travel cash and a place to play, they would just play wherever, Japan, South Africa, Australia, the Euro. But this whole argument and fight is BECAUSE the PGA Tour feels threatened that without the big money draw, that they are going to lose the players as well as the “top billing” label of the PGA Tour being THE PLACE to play for the best players, right?
      Just shut it. Your reasonings are completely and utterly meaningless and useless. Yes, old man, go watch some skirts

      Reply

      Mike

      4 months ago

      Kudos on all your points except that if LIV had meaningful events like majors, I’d watch them. I don’t put down anyone for taking an obscene amount of money for doing the same job.

      Reply

      Mike Tisson

      4 months ago

      when the same $$ murdered 3,000 Americans I take exception. I had friends die on 9/11 so if you want to be a terrorist apologist hope you f’n die too.

      MountainBill

      4 months ago

      Ignore the hatefilled ramblings (and inaccuracies) of the rude Cryptodog. You’re spot on, Ron, as is the story. I’ve been an avid golfer and ardent fan for well over 50 years.
      Still love the game, but there’s nothing noble about pro golf anymore.
      It’s a money grab with no conscience. I don’t fault the PGA, but LIV was the answer to a question no one was asking.
      It’s really hurt the game itself with an exteded middle finger aimed at fans.
      I stopped watching and wish there were more LPGA events to watch..
      I’ve said it elsewhere, but I enjoy watching technically pure swings vs high torque my back can no longer produce.
      I’m not interested in what they wear, as Cryptodog seems to be obsessed with. That’s a side show for gals almost good enough for the tour but make more selling images and appearance fees.
      But the LPGA has more fun and a camaraderie lacking on the current male tours.
      Bottom line, I don’t know what the goal of Norman and the Saudis truly was, but the result is less competition and more visible greed.
      Boring..
      I prefer to hit a bucket of balls on the range.

      Reply

      John Elliot

      3 months ago

      Well said MountainBill… there’s a lot of blame to go around… collectively, the PGA tour’s management and the unconscionable monetary feeding trough provided by a vindictive Greg Norman and his Saudi overlords have ruined men’s professional golf.
      Like you, I’d rather hit a bucket of balls.

      Ed

      4 months ago

      Well said…agree across the board.

      Reply

      Mike L

      4 months ago

      It is never about the money, it’s always about the amount.

      Reply

      Don

      4 months ago

      The entire saga is sad. To
      many to mention. Outside of all the negative points (most of all which I agree) add some other negatives. *Get paid big money to move and guarantee prize money if finishing last. #No future recognition as other golf greats. #Wives & family left at home. # Names that will go down in history as destroying professional golf.
      While I am sure we can all agree with freedom of choice; and financial security; where would you place pride & reputation. ??

      Reply

      Brad

      4 months ago

      I’m one of those just tired of the back and forth and just want to watch some good golf. I believe there should be a “premier” league that offers the top 50-75 players playing all over the world for the big bucks every other week (including cureent big pga tourneys) . The PGA Tour will host the other lesser tournaments the other weeks with the lesser players (51 or 76 and lower). The Saudis will need to help fund those purses since not as many eyes will be on that product. There will be relegation each year for the bottom 5-10 spots, or more for the lesser players/hot rookies/etc to be able to move up and those lesser tourneys will still allow those players the ability to play in majors. And I’m also ok with there being a team aspect in that Premier league with trading, drafting, etc I think having those top 50 guys together every other week guaranteed, for say 10 months, would be awesome to watch

      Reply

      Windsurfer

      2 months ago

      Do you really only like to see superstars competing? Every touring pro has the possibility of a hot streak and winning a significant tournament… it’s really fun to see and offers far more drama and excitement than Rory beating Rahm by maintaining par over the last three holes…

      Reply

      League Golfer

      4 months ago

      All of pro sports is a scam that rips off the local taxpayers, as well as the people buying tickets, and those of us who pay extra for everything that is advertised by the sports themselves and during the commercial breaks as well. The entire sporting event and tv show is a slimy sales job, every second of it, from the pregame show to the game itself through the post game show. None of it “matters” and no one’s life is truly better if team A or team B wins. Nowadays, much of it is all centered around getting suckers to gamble and lose their money to gambling corporations. If you really care about any pro sports beyond a tiny amount of interest and mild amusement, then you are being sucked into their robbery of most of their fans money and time. Stop being a sucker for pro sports people. None of it matters.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      Man, that F1 in Vegas was a fine example of that. Talk about a waste of time, money, resources and manpower. Absolute pits of an example of what a debacle that sort of thing can be.
      And the amount of the same type of effort put into the stupidity that is the NFL and that sport in the US blows my mind. All the equipment! and people needed, from the refs and physios and everything – why not just quit that sport completely and just make it football ⚽️ and rugby 🏉, it would be so much easier and the world would pay more attention and the US could bring in global money for these two sports because the NFL doesn’t.

      Reply

      MountainBill

      4 months ago

      Solid point. Pro sports in general has devalued its product while gambling has taken center stage (sadly). When you see interference calls in the NFL ignored, balls and strikes called the opposite and the NBA doing more traveling than a frequent flier, it gets hard to take any of them seriously.
      The integrity of the games and the true fans have become afterthoughts..I’ve written off the NFL and NBA to political nonsense and fear MLB may succumb soon also.
      Hockey is still worth watching and the golf majors still hold hope for filling entertainment free time needs but the upside is more productive uses of free time.

      Reply

      Andrew

      4 months ago

      If you want to “fix” golf simply look at how it’s done in Australia. Not overly reliant on ads in the televising of the events and get massive crowds. Why? Because it’s old fashioned and simple like the days that Jack and Gary used to go there all the time.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      But, see, the problem with the “other” Tours around the world, is that they don’t have the LARGE PRIZE MONEY that the US PGA Tour does LMAO
      But, I think we are about to see that change, hopefully.

      Reply

      Dave

      4 months ago

      You hit it squarely on the head. Who really cares anymore? With the greed and lure of money and more money, fans cannot connect to players. Same as MLB. Personally. I’ve stopped attending and volunteering at pga tourneys and since LIV/PGA spats. I’ve quit watching. And do not miss it.

      Reply

      Dave H

      4 months ago

      You hit it squarely on the head. Who really cares anymore? With the greed and lure of money and more money, fans cannot connect to players. Same as MLB. Personally. I’ve stopped attending and volunteering at pga tourneys and since LIV/PGA spats. I’ve quit watching. And do not miss it.

      Reply

      Frank W.

      4 months ago

      This is so similar to the CART/IRL split in 1996. It permanently weakened the sport and golf is heading down the same path.
      It seems it’s really all about the Benjamins these days in every professional sport. I was lucky to have grown up in a time when athletes still played for the love of the game. They can’t expect average consumers to foot the bill for these ridiculous paychecks athletes now receive. Too bad for golf as the core is now fractured in a way that can never be repaired to bring it back to it’s former status.

      Reply

      Morse

      4 months ago

      Wow! I was literally going to write about the CART/IRL split. It’s basically the same thing. Open-wheel racing hasn’t recovered for decades. Golf will still grab some eyeballs for the majors, the same way that the Indy 500 does, but these will no longer be considered appointment viewing.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      Why worry? They have F1 now LMAO

      Reply

      John Jendza

      4 months ago

      The article fairly accurately describes my feelings. I enjoy playing more than watching golf. The fact that there is nowhere to watch all of the best players compete with each other is leaving me indifferent. I enjoy watching the LPGA more and more.
      I do understand the reasons for pros going to the money and the TV coverage increasing as revenue, but it makes it less enjoyable to watch.
      I also experience more ad revenue components in the MGS experience. It’s a sign of the times.

      Reply

      Trusty Rusty

      4 months ago

      I see lots of comments about selling out to the Saudis, the Saudi phenomenon is not limited to golf, we saw this in the world cup in Qatar. It didn’t stop all those American advertisers now did it? From Apple, Coke, Budweiser to American express- they all contributed to a country that has a worse record of human rights. The awarding of the world cup to qatar would make Tony Soprano envious. World Cup soccer is the Superbowl to the rest of the world. The point is it’s all about the money. The Saudis also have a stranglehold on professional soccer. and like it or not just a matter of time before it hits MLB and NFL, although those groups are highly protective of ownership. But they’ll come around ( to the money)

      I watched a tremendous amount of golf for years and decades, but now recently not so much. I’ll watch the majors for sure. As I reflect though, I’m not sure what has turned me off, the lack of star power? I’ve never hear of him, where is the next Phil? Are the players themselves being so robot-like? Can someone please laugh or joke? Even the players look all alike with Nike being the dress code of the PGA tour. The Saudis? or is it Rory’s bitchin and moaning every week about LIV. & Greg Norman

      Now that I think about it, it is Rory that is the biggest turn-off for me.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      Thank goodness the MLB found Shohei, huh? LMAO
      because a few years ago prior to his arrival baseball was being said to be dying

      Reply

      Randy

      4 months ago

      Thanks Greg, now nobody cares or watches, but the players are loaded and can wear shorts….

      Reply

      Jimmybagadonuts

      4 months ago

      I play sports for a living. Another team or organization offers me more money, so I leave and go play for them.

      This appears to be okay to do in EVERY sport on the planet except for golf. Who made that rule?

      The PGA did this to themselves. Some in their leadership are as crooked as my left eye. They started a Separate but equal black league(APGA), gave Billions to D.E.I. bull crap and getting grifted by BLM left them broke with absolutely no ROI for those investments.

      FunFact: without Aramco money, LPGA would have disappeared.

      And if the Saudis were responsible for 9/11, why the hell did we go to war in Iraq and Afghanistan for 20 years!?!

      Its all bull crap. Play for whom you want and where you want. To hell with what people say about it. You do you and ignore all the noise.

      Reply

      I miss, I miss, I make

      4 months ago

      There are basically two sports that I have watched seriously for my too many years. One is Formula 1 racing and the other is golf, With F1 Saudi involvement is more of a sponsorship arraignment and with LIV Golf it is outright ownership. Change occurs in all sport and in F1 the changes have been subtle and it is difficult to separate what is directed and what is evolved.
      We have seen golf evolve through the years but when LIV arrived the very structure of professional golf changed. That a player like Jon Rahm who is thoughtful, knowledgeable and introspective has been turned into a puppet is sad.
      I have my feelings about 9/11. Jamal Khashoggi. They will not go away. Some will say you buy gas. Yes. If a brand was labeled Saudi -Free oil I would shop there. If the TOUR merges with the PIF as seems likely I will continue to play golf as fervently as I have for many decades however the TOUR will no longer be part of my viewing habit.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      Oh do shut up about 911. How about all the horrors the US have done all over the world, including the Arabic regions for the past 100 years spurred on by its hunger for power and domination? If the US hadn’t been involved in any of that, we wouldn’t be in the sh1t we are in today. Think about that. Isolating Khashoggi like that does little to speak for countless others and places like Guantanamo, FFS.
      Wake up.
      It’s ok to withdraw all the troops from around the world at any time, and apologies and turn the US into a country of peace than a constantly invading, warring nation of ingrates.
      Oh what will you do next? Drop a couple more nukes and a few million gallons of Agent Orange?

      Reply

      I miss, I miss, I make

      4 months ago

      Unlike LIV which is owned by PIF of Saudi Arabia which is an arm of the Saudi government the PGATOUR is a private enterprise and not owned or funded by the US government and certainly not responsible for the actions of the US government. Whatever sins the US Government has committed, and there are many, it was not the TOUR that participated in or directed those actions. LIV however is directly owned by the Saudi central government and therefore I feel I am correct to connect LIV and the Saudi government

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      The US government, Obama, RESCUED and BAILED out the American Car companies did he not? So where did that money come from? THE government, right? So that means the government OWNS the car companies. Don’t give me the semantics, if you PAY for something, you OWN it. Look at the stock market? The banks? Look what the government did to save banks and the insurance and finance companies who defrauded people! So who OWNS the banks? The government!!! I see NOTHING different between the PGA Tour getting money from sponsors who are the car companies and banks and insurance companies who ALL got their money from the government so they can keep running.
      The entire American system of life in governance is about OWNERSHIP and printing money and who buys what when and how it’s all OWNED.
      YOU are owned. The PGA Tour is just another entity OWNED by the same MONEY, and as I was saying, who HOLDS the MONEY?
      So why shouldn’t the Saudi do the same thing? They funnel money like the Americans do into the American money system, and are BUYING things. End of!
      911? Why didn’t you invade Saudi Arabia then bomb the crap out of them, Qatar and UAE which were all in the same area, instead of just blaming it on Bin Laden and chasing him around?

      Cryptodoggie

      4 months ago

      Cryptodog, seriously, STFU – you think you need to comment on everyone’s post? People are entitled to their own opinions and they sure as heck don’t need you to moderate or “correct” them. Nobody cares…zzzzzzzz……

      Bye Jon – don’t let the door hit ya. I stopped caring about pro golf this year and won’t be watching, not even the majors. The way the PGA Tour and Norman et al handled this whole thing why.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      You cared so much that you had to create a new name and post here sheesh
      Looks my points have made home and people can’t handle the truth.
      You would want to be a billionaire like everybody else no matter how you come across the money and you know it.
      Would you be willing to take the money away from Eldrick Tont? I hear he was a billionaire until he had to give half to his ex-wife lmao

      JWES

      4 months ago

      MGS has never been anything but negative and dismissive towards LIV’s efforts to bring innovation to the golf experience, and is now predictably blaming it for apathy in general. Blame the PGA’s monopolistic reactionary stance against innovation.

      Reply

      BH

      4 months ago

      Gone are the days of Palmer, Nicklaus, Trevino, Watson, Zoeller, etc. I wasn’t around then, but I enjoy the highlights. The LIV style of golf is the most uninteresting thing I’ve ever seen.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      Well you missed the best days of golf.
      Some sex addict named Eldrick Tont came along and wrecked it for everybody. Luckily for me I didn’t watch any golf when he was playing so I was spared the stupidity.
      Joe Pesci was heard saying back in the late 90s that, “ that boy Woods don’t know which way is up he’s chasing so much tail, it’s gonna catch up to him at some time”
      and thank goodness it did.
      The game of golf is better without homewreckers like Eldrick Tont.
      LIV has come to save the game.

      Reply

      Cryptodoggie

      4 months ago

      Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz….. I can tell from your defensive response above that you know I’m right. Nobody cares about your multiple “educational” posts.

      Jim Craven

      4 months ago

      Your article is spot on. I used to have a keen interest in watching golf. I’ve started watching more NFL and NBA games. I try not to think much about the PGA/LIV/PFA debacle (it just makes me mad). I’m going for “indifference”. Thanks for posting this article.

      Reply

      MarkM

      4 months ago

      I really enjoy watching pro golf on TV and will continue to do so, just not interested at all in any LIV events. I hope that more guys don’t bolt but it won’t affect my viewership. As far as the money, how much do you really need to take care of your family? When is it enough? Apparently it gets tough living on only $17 mil in tournament earnings.
      What I absolutely don’t care about is hearing or reading about any of the PGA Tour vs. LIV nonsense. If the time comes that the Tour changes to become lap dogs of PIF then I’ll be watching the LPGA (until they succumb as well). After that, I guess I’ll have a lot more time to practice.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      LIV is so completely entertaining due to its camaraderie amongst the teams and teammates, I get glued to it every time it’s on, and it’s free on the LIV app WITHOUT COMMERCIALS!!! The fact that they have no commercials is already a winner in my book, I don’t need the incessant advertising of poorly made American and Korean cars and penile enhancing drugs every 2 minutes.
      And speaking of money – why do NFL, NBA, MLB and NHL guys make the stupid money when other sports don’t in the US??? You don’t have a problem with that? So you can’t say what you’re saying if you don’t bring those other useless sports into this conversation .
      How about tennis? Football ⚽️?
      Nobody cares about running or gymnastics or figure skating or downhill ski, do they? How about Volleyball? Did you know there’s a global league in Volleyball? So how come there wasn’t one for golf? Well finally we are headed for one.

      Reply

      Trusty rusty

      4 months ago

      When guys say taking care of their family, they are referencing generations of their families- at least that’s how I took it..

      Reply

      Steve S

      4 months ago

      This statement is bordering on tone deaf…”But Rahm is also the latest in a long line of important people who have prioritized their own business interests ahead of the greater good” Really? This is not about curing poverty or fighting and dying for freedom. It’s about entertainment money, plain and simple. Golf has only existed for a few hundred years and my disappear in the next few hundred. It’s a diversion from the realities of life and may be supplanted by a better one. So who cares about the pro game? A small percentage of the weekend golfers, the rest have a casual interest but still will play the game regardless. I do watch pro golf; in Jan-Feb when I need a Sunday afternoon nap. Turn it on and I’m asleep in 10 minutes.

      Reply

      CryptoDog

      4 months ago

      👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏

      Reply

      DuckHead

      4 months ago

      I couldn’t agree more. Perfectly stated. Perspective matters and is what’s lost in the typical narrative. Pro golf has absolutely nothing I value.

      Reply

      Rich

      4 months ago

      I can’t imagine turning down the money after it came out that the PGA themselves were doing everything they could to sell out to the Saudis… “Hmm, should I take the money, or should I sit back and let my lying bosses have it? Decisions, decisions.”

      Reply

      Steve

      4 months ago

      When professional baseball, basketball, football or soccer players move teams for max contracts it’s lauded as a great move. When a golfer does it it’s considered greed. Didn’t hear anyone beating up Ohtani getting $700M as greedy but cheered for how the contract was written. Can’t have it both ways yet the talking heads say so.

      The LIV PGAT saga happens all the time in the business world. Established companies have to evolve to their competition. Otherwise their doors close.

      Reply

      CK

      4 months ago

      Steve, Ohtani stayed in MLB and he did move for personal greed. But I haven’t heard of any charges of disgusting human rights violations against the owners of the Dodgers. We ALL know (including these golfers) what these animals are capable of yet they take the money and state family and personal freedom as the reasons when the people that are giving them the money hate both of those things.

      Reply

      Will

      4 months ago

      I never watched golf on TV or cared about the pros to begin with, but I’ve gotta say, selling yourself to the Saudis is a good way to turn my apathy into animosity.

      Reply

      CK

      4 months ago

      I agree Will. I would love to read these contracts. I suspect that with the money in turn goes a part of your value system and what you believe (a.k.a soul). Tear it down from within. We can’t say we didn’t see it coming.

      Reply

      Tom

      4 months ago

      Done with Pro golf of any description.
      Done and do not care.
      Ever again.

      Reply

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