Callaway Mack Daddy CB Wedge
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Callaway Mack Daddy CB Wedge

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Callaway Mack Daddy CB Wedge

The Callaway Mack Daddy CB wedge offers a perimeter-weighted cavity-back design. That alone differentiates it from the majority of specialty wedges on the market today.

If you play game-improvement irons and have never felt comfortable with blade-style wedges or you’ve gotten wise to the fact that your set-matching A, G, S or L wedges don’t spin worth a damn, you’re exactly who Callaway is hoping to reach with its new wedges.

an image of the Callaway Mack Daddy CB Wedge

Contradictions in the Wedge Market

You may have never considered this but the wedge space is rife with contradictions. They’re mostly of the industry’s own making. The topic has been covered before by Cleveland and Mizuno but the conversation is relevant again with Callaway entering the fray.

It’s indisputable that the majority of golfers plays game-improvement or super game-improvement irons. Equally true is that the overwhelming majority of wedges sold are blade designs like Vokey and Mack Daddy JAWS.

It’s at least possible that the contradiction between the most popular irons and the most popular wedges can be traced to a lack of options.

Game-improvement players who aren’t comfortable with blade wedges often choose set-matching wedges.

Game-improvement players who want greater versatility and more spin around the green will typically choose a blade wedge.

The reputable options for game-improvement players who want the best of both worlds can be counted on one hand.

Shouldn’t there be more?

an image of the face of the Callaway Mack Daddy CB Wedge

Mack Daddy CB DNA

Callaway thinks so. That’s why it took a bit of JAWS MD5, some PM Grind and, I suppose, a less off-putting touch of Sure Out, and made the Mack Daddy CB wedge.

You get soles designed to work for the specific need of the target golfer and full-face JAWS grooves that are capable of generating real spin around the green – even when you miss the middle of the face by more than a little.

By the numbers, the Mack Daddy CB is only four percent larger than JAWS MD5. There’s size, and then there’s shape. The point is the CB looks big enough to differentiate itself from a blade but not so big as to look ridiculous.

Before anyone says it, this type of wedge isn’t new and it’s definitely not unique to Callaway. We covered similar offerings in our discussion on set-matching pitching wedges. Cleveland is two generations deep with its CBX line and Mizuno, with the S-series, has dabbled in this space as well.

That said, just because someone else has, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t. COVID’s golf boom has created a flood of new and returning golfers. A higher-handicap demographic looking for more forgiveness in the short game is the ideal audience for the Mack Daddy CB. And, not for nuthin’, the big specialty wedge category presents an opportunity for Callaway to play in a sandbox where market leader, Vokey, doesn’t.

Mack Daddy CB Wedge – Two Grinds

One of the stated goals of Mack Daddy CB offering is to take the guesswork out of your short game. That includes finding the right grind. And while I’m tempted to rephrase that as limiting your options, the argument is that the target player isn’t necessarily using his pitching and gap wedges around the green. He’s probably not manipulating the face of his higher-lofted wedges either. Callaway’s thinking is the Mack Daddy CB golfer isn’t looking to do anything much fancier than getting the ball on the green.

So, with that in mind, pitching and gap wedge lofts feature a full sole design. It’s intended to work in much the same way as the sole on your irons. You get plenty of forgiveness from the cavity-back design without giving up forgiveness in the way the sole interacts with the turf. The performance benefit should prove to be more spin and greater stopping power on full shots into greens.

Sand and lob wedge lofts offer a modified version of Callaway’s W grind. It’s not open it up and flop it versatile but it’s designed to give you a bit more versatility around the green. That’s especially true for golfers who struggle to escape bunkers.

It’s not about style points; it’s about getting up and down more often.

With that in mind, eight bounce/grind combinations seem reasonable. The lineup isn’t nearly as robust as the mainstream JAWS MD5 but it covers 46 to 60 degrees in two-degree increments.

an address view of the Callaway Mack Daddy CB Wedge

Mack Daddy CB Wedge – Stock Shafts and Grips

The stock steel shaft in the Callaway Mack Daddy CB is the KBS Hi-Rev 2.0 105. It’s quite a bit lighter than the typical wedge shaft. That speaks to the reality that the target player is likely playing something in the 85- to 105-gram steel range. It’s one thing to play a heavier shaft in your wedges; it’s another to play one that is, by comparison, obnoxiously heavy.

The graphite option is the KBS Hi-Rev G. It’s an 80-gram option that should pair well with lighter-weight graphite iron shafts.

A 60-gram version is available for women. The stock women’s build is one inch shorter.

The stock grip is the Golf Pride SG-1. The 1 indicates the grip is one-inch longer than standard, giving you the option of choking down a bit.

The women’s grip is the Lamkin Sonar Women.

the Callaway Mack Daddy CB wedge in 56- and 60-degrees.

Pricing and Availability

The retail price for the Callaway Mack Daddy CB is $129.99. Availability begins Sept. 24.

For more information, visit Callawaygolf.com.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Rob

      3 years ago

      I haven’t seen any comments from owners of these. Mack daddy CBs. I’m 33 yo and a 15 handicap.

      I bought 54° and 58°. My wedge game has never been better. I love them. I haven’t thinned a shot with them yet in 10 or so rounds. I haven’t had issues opening the face either. I am replacing my set gap wedge with a 50° on order as well. Can’t recommend them enough. They are incredibly easy to hit. I’m confident they won’t ever dig. Allows me to focus on how hard to hit it rather than whether or not I’m chunking it. Traditional wedges be damned.

      Reply

      Bob

      4 years ago

      Are you doing a most wanted thing for wedges this year?

      Reply

      Jake

      4 years ago

      A question for Tony. Would you buy them?

      Reply

      Steve

      4 years ago

      T.C.,
      Within this review, you mentioned the Callaway Easy out wedges, which brings up the following question since I bought two Easy outs (58&64) shortly after they came out. The 64, only because I could not find a 60 anywhere at the time. I’m a little better than average around the greens with the 58, and just average with the 64 in sand. Could these new wedges be a possible replacement of my sure outs ? Older senior, late 70’s, and struggling to stay in the 70’s.

      Reply

      Willie T

      4 years ago

      I am a recent convert to Cleveland CBX wedges (50* and 58*) and really enjoy hitting them. They play well against my Callaway Diablo Edge irons. Yes, I am that golfer, a 20+ handicap, over-60, who hits drives about 190. So the idea of Callaway doing a cavity back wedge is neat. To be honest, I really like my old Ping Eye2 wedges that hit very well, still. I am looking to see how the market reacts., in the end, it comes to what you like playing – whether cavity or blade or somewhere in between. If it gets you closer to the cup, that is all that matters.

      Reply

      Simms

      4 years ago

      I went to the Cleveland CBX, 50, 58 also…Paid $139 each, just traded them after about 4 months for a big $21 each trade in on some new Pings and was happy to get that….

      Reply

      Steve

      4 years ago

      I know my wedges are worn but I have some that fit me and I never find anything I like as much as my old mix of wedges. I like the groves going all the way out.. My wedges would have to get stolen for me to switch. High handicap and all I love playing out of sand very confident when I’m in a bunker.. I would have to like the look of it when I look down or it will mess with my head. some look like a flip-flop on a stick the are so big..

      Reply

      Kansas King

      4 years ago

      I’m surprised it’s taken this long for more companies to jump onto the GI wedge train. I’ve been a big proponent of the CBX and similar wedges for gap wedges and higher lofted wedges. It doesn’t make very much sense to use a muscle back blade for a wedge that is almost exclusively used for squared up shots from 50 – 125 yards out. I tried a stock CBX 52* and liked it but the shaft was too light. I honestly wouldn’t be shocked if we see these types of wedges on tour if the face isn’t too hot. I could see the extra MOI being welcome by the pros on a lower lofted gap wedge. They strive for consistency and this could actually help, especially if they are hitting a 50* wedge 160 yards..

      Reply

      Chris

      4 years ago

      I currently use the Cleveland CBX wedges and I am very happy with them. Though if you want to send me some to demo I would be happy to give them a tryout. for next summer.

      Reply

      Joe Domill

      4 years ago

      they seem to be for high handicap players isn,t a bad thing.

      Reply

      Vern

      4 years ago

      I have been trying to play a CBX 54 deg. Absolutely hate the club. I replaced it with Scratch forged 56 deg. and love it. I played Scratch wedges for years and have always regretted getting rid of them. If I could find some more new Scratch wedges I would sell my RTX4’s.

      Reply

      DEA Kelly

      4 years ago

      Have scratch wedges to sell

      Reply

      Chi-town 49

      4 years ago

      I compared your initial review of this wedge to the one on GOLFWRX and yours is far far superior. Thanks

      Reply

      Tank

      4 years ago

      Not a fan of full face.

      Reply

      shortside

      4 years ago

      Agreed. I switched to Cleveland RTX-3 CB’s a few years back after playing a 54* demo for 1 round. Not a single practice ball. I was sold that fast. Way easier to put it mildly. Especially on 3/4 and full shots.

      Fact is the average golfer sports at least a 16 handicap. Missing greens more often than not.. Which is why we look at a lot of 40 to 80 yard shots for 1 putt pars. Our best rounds always happen when we have a great day with the wedges.

      My only complaint (though Cleveland had good options with the RTX-3 CB’s) is most of the CB wedges lack low bounce options. Most of us play courses with a lot of tight lies around the greens and far from the fluffiest sand. If not dirt or close to it. I get it with SGI wedges. But……..It’d be nice if the manufacturer’s took look at the average course conditions most play.

      Reply

      Kansas King

      4 years ago

      This has to do with “effective bounce”. The wider the sole and greater the sole radius, the less the leading edge needs to be from the ground. If the bounce was much higher, it would be difficult for the golfer to not thin shots on firmer turf. These wedges appear to have a rather aggressive sole radius (rounder) which will likely increase the “effective bounce” which should make the club less prone to digging even though the bounce is lower. Bounce is not the single factor in determining “digging” potential. You also have to take into sole radius and width. Leading edge sharpness is also a factor. The other big factor is your swing.

      Reply

      Mike

      4 years ago

      Just seems to be a direct copy of what Cleveland has done with their CBX line of wedges. I played those Cleveland CBX’s for 2 seasons with very inconsistent results. Went to a wedge fitting at 2nd Awing and they recommended Titleist Vokeys. I bought 2 SM7’s in mint condition for 40% less than the new SM8. Absolutely love them to death! I’ll save the cavity back stuff for my irons. Now, around the green, I feel like I have a scalpel in my hand instead of a bread knife.

      Reply

      John

      4 years ago

      Pretty neat. Wouldn’t the Ping Glide also be considered somewhat of a CB design?

      Reply

      Ian

      4 years ago

      Look pleasing to the eye except for the leading edge as it meets the top, it seems too sharp. Even though it is $20 dollars more ish, I think the Cleveland CBX 2 in terms of looks for a cavity back wedge does it much better.

      Reply

      mackdaddy9

      4 years ago

      I agree

      Reply

      cody

      4 years ago

      Cleveland called, They want their wedge back..

      Reply

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