Titleist T350 Iron Review
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Titleist T350 Iron Review

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Titleist T350 Iron Review

What We Tried

Titleist T350 Irons. The biggest iron in the new Titleist T-Series lineup.

Your Titleist T350 Tester

Tony Covey. MyGolfSpy Editorial Director and mediocre iron player who, despite himself, is not a fan of large irons.

Yeah. This is not a match made in Heaven.

The Requisite Background

Titleist T350 Irons

For a long time, I was a high-flight, high-spin player with every club in the bag. Envious of those able to flight the ball with a piercing trajectory, I worked to bring my ball flight down.

Somewhere along the way, I over-corrected … apparently.

To date, much of our conversation around the T-Series lineup has focused on feel. I’ll touch on that but my primary issue plays directly into Titleist’s 3D (Distance Control, Descent, Dispersion) fitting approach. Specifically, in my case, descent angle.

See, the way it works is that before something (a golf ball, for example) can come down, it must go up. In my case, it wasn’t going up quite high enough. I was maxing out at around 85 feet.

My fitter (Joey) wanted to see that number closer to 100. Higher flight should provide steeper descent so we set out to find a combination of head and shaft that would get me there.

As you’ve not doubt already pieced together, I ended up in the T350 (with my typical Nippon Modus 120 X shaft).

A couple quick points.

First, despite the strongest lofts in the lineup, with the same shaft, I hit the T350 higher than the other 3 T-Series models.

Second, remember that stock lofts are just a starting point. Eventually, we landed on one degree weak (two degrees flat). Still strong but not as strong.

Titleist T350 Irons

About the Titleist T350

I’ll spare you the full refresh on the technology that powers the T350. If you’re new to T-Series, we cover all of it here. The abbreviated version is that the T350 is the largest, most game-improvementy of the current T-Series lineup.

It’s a hollow-body design that packs the sole with tungsten to produce higher ball flight with plenty of ball speed coming by way of Titleist’s MAX IMPACT technology.

Said another way, it’s an upsized take on the T200 for golfers who need more help than the rest of the T-Series lineup offers.

Initial Impressions

I’m going to level with you. If you laid the four T-Series models in front of me, the T350 would be the last one I’d choose and my assumption was I’d end up in T150s or T200s. T350 was out of the question.

Did I mention I don’t like big irons?

That said, as far as big irons go, the T350 isn’t all that bad. The offset isn’t huge and it’s reasonably well hidden. The topline, though thick, has some camber to it, making it appear thinner. There’s no hiding the blade length but it’s hardly the most egregious on the market.

I’ve seen way worse.

Titleist T350 Iron - address view

All of that said, if club fitting was just about choosing what you like best, there wouldn’t be much point. The objective of fitting is to improve on-course results … or at least it should be.

With that in mind, when I go through a fitting, I try to let the fitter do his thing and not let my feelings get in the way too much. While I might feel like there’s no chance I’ll be happy with a T350, I’ll keep it to myself and let things play out.

Let the man do his job.

As a result, I’ve ended up in some stuff I wouldn’t necessarily have chosen for myself, most recently, a shorter-shafted putter with an unfamiliar shape. Keep your minds open, people.

It’s not lost on me that a perk of this job is the freedom to defer to the fitter’s recommendation without fear of regret. If I don’t love it, there’s always something else.

Full disclosure: Even though I was seeing more consistency and significantly higher ball flight during my fitting, I still didn’t love the idea of T350s and was all but convinced they wouldn’t stay in the bag.

I’d play a couple of courtesy rounds to reaffirm my disklike of larger irons and that would be the end of it.

Next.

Titleist T350 Performance

Titleist T350 Iron

Once home, I took the T350s into the hitting bay to see how they compare to my gamers. I have nothing but good things to say about the PXG 0311 GEN5 Ts that have been in my bag since my fitting.

I love the look (they’re not big), love the feel and the results have been generally good. Frankly, I loved them when I got them and I still do but it’s true that with the long irons in particular, the flight is a bit low.

Indoors

The PXG’s aren’t a typical Tour iron (they’re not short by any means) so, for the most part, I expected performance differences to be small. That’s especially true considering we’re comparing fitted irons to fitted irons with actual lofts withinone degree of each other.

Measured with a Foresight GCQuad, I got a bit more speed (about 1.5 mph) with the T350 and about three yards more total distance.

With respect to max height – the thing we focused on in the fitting – the T350s flew about seven feet higher, though the most noticeable differences were on the ball that starts left, where the T350s retain a bit more height.

Titleist T-Series T350 Irons

On Course

This is the part where you might expect me to tell you that the Titleist T350 are the best irons ever and that I’ve shaved 10 strokes off my score.

Let’s set some realistic expectations.

I live and die by the driver. My home course is tight (white stakes on every hole, sometimes both sides). Improvement by way of a better iron play is measured in 10ths of strokes gained, though there are times when the benefit of moving to the T350 is inarguable.

There are the obvious things. I’m hitting the ball higher. I’m hitting it farther than the indoor data suggested I would. And, while I’ll be the first to tell you that prioritizing iron distance is a fool’s folly, if you can get it without sacrificing performance in other areas, I say go for it.

No ragrets.

Little things stand out as well. There’s a toe shot (my sweet spot) on No. 8. I’ve hit the same shot 50 times over the years and I’m telling you there’s no chance it clears the bunker … except it did.

Instead of one of the scariest shots on the course (firm, nearly sand-less bunker with OB long), I’m on the fringe. A two-putt birdie instead of … well, we can’t be sure,but a pocket eight isn’t out of the question.

My 5-iron flies noticeably higher, too.

I still have the occasional left miss but the big (wrong side of the white stakes) left miss is pretty much gone. That one probably comes down to the physics of the longer blade length keeping the face from closing down when I get a little quick with the hands.

All of that said, I’m not going to tell you I’m firing at every pin and sticking it tight every time. Sure, I hit some really good shots but I did that with my other irons. The real difference is that with the T350s I get away with a little bit more and that gives me a chance to salvage something on the days when I’m sideways with my woods.

Long story short. One last round with the T350s led to one more and when the days got shorter and the leaves started to fall, the Titleist T350 irons were still in the bag.

T350 Feel

Titleist T-Series T350 Iron

Feel is a big part of the Titleist story for the T-Series so I’d be remiss not to at least touch on it. As far as feel goes, the T350 is a noticeable step up from the prior-gen T300. I had a chance to hit them side by side in my fitting and if you’re a T300 guy, I’m willing to bet you’ll notice the improvement immediately.

Despite the best efforts of engineering teams, I’m not convinced you can ever replicate forged-iron feel with a hollow-body design but the T350 feels good for what it is – and likely better than most in its class.

It’s not as pleasingly soft as a T100 or T150 and, if I’m being entirely honest, I prefer the feel of my GEN5s,but I don’t have any real complaints.

I know when I absolutely flush one. I know when I miss, too, but that miss feels a hell of a lot better than it does with the prior-gen stuff.

The Takeaway

Titleist T-Series irons

The Titleist T350 is one of the more surprising pieces of equipment I’ve encountered over the last couple of seasons. It’s not surprising that a Titleist iron would perform well. It’s that the advantages would be enough for me to get over my dislike of larger irons.

I still don’t like big irons but it’s hard to argue with higher flight, more forgiveness and more distance. Granted, that last one is a bonus but, again, I never expected to keep them in the bag.

As the season comes to an end here in New York State, the plan is to work on my game over the winter: weight training, Stack Systems, plenty of reps on the simulator, maybe even a lesson or two.

Maybe I’ll get to the point where the T350s are more than what I need from a forgiveness standpoint (in addition to being more than I typically prefer to look at). It’s also true that each new season brings with it new equipment temptations but I’ve established a new bar. So long as I can remain rational instead of emotional about what goes into the bag, the T350s might just kick around for another season.

Retail price for Titlesit T350 irons is $1,399.

For more information, visit Titleist.com.

For You

For You

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      WiTerp

      3 months ago

      I had gotten an invitation to try the new Gen 3 irons. Wasn’t planning to go, but the forged face sounded intriguing. The T350 was way better than the Gen 2 T300 and paired well with the T200. Now, going to plan to skip the next generation. My experience, at a much slower speed, is similar to Tony’s.

      Reply

      Steve S

      3 months ago

      Anyone here tried these who has old man swing speed(driver 90mph or below)? I’ve found that the jacked loft irons caused me to hit balls lower with less spin. Actually hit the Srixon ZX5’s and 7’s higher, farther and more spin than the ZX4’s. I can only attribute that to the slower swing speed. Seems to follow with any delofted irons for me. I currently play a set that has 35 degree 7 iron and a 46 degree pitching wedge and played better this year than last with a super game improvement set. Lowered my handicap 3 strokes from April to Sept. strictly due to better iron play.

      Reply

      Robert Melvin

      3 months ago

      I would love to see a comparison between the T-350 irons and the new Gen 6 XP irons

      Reply

      bob

      3 months ago

      I just made the concession that my game is not where it used to be and I have limited time to practice so my Mizunos have been relegated to my second bag and I just sold my Wilson V6 irons. Picked up the new Adams Idea irons, very easy to hit. More on the chunky side than I am used to but I need and want the forgiveness. Great price too, got them 20% off, came out to around $480 for 4-PW. Cannot beat that price for some really nice irons. That being said, MSG giving a really positive review to a Titleist product is as surprising as the Dallas Cowboys and Lions being on TV tomorrow.

      Reply

      WYBob

      3 months ago

      Tony- Thanks for the excellent review of your personal experience with the Titleist T350. In the article, you mentioned that your prior gamers were PXG 0311 Gen 5 T’s. Those would appear to be more in line with the Titleist T150 (or possibly the new T200). It would be interesting to see what your comparison would be if you were to fit into the newer PXG Gen 6 P’s or XP’s which are more in line with the T350. Both the P and XP are designed to help get the ball’s trajectory higher and thus would be more of an apples-to-apples comparison. Not mentioned in the article were the differences in turf interaction between the two models which is also an important consideration. Just some random thoughts from the fringe. Have a great Thanksgiving. Cheers…

      Reply

      Rob

      3 months ago

      Fellow T350 fan here. I came from the 2nd Gen T300 and I’ll start where you ended, the feel is worth the upgrade alone…IMO.

      But all the other aspects are true as well, I’ve seen higher ball flight, steeped Descent and a few more yards. One thing you didn’t mention which is very shallow thinking but is a thing, is bag appeal. These look much better in the bag than the T300 and most other Game Improvement irons. As well as looking better at address as you mentioned.

      Titleist got a lot of things right with the T350. It has it’s work cut out for it in 2025 when the new models will be due.

      Reply

      Tom54

      3 months ago

      I got the T300 irons in the spring, and for me, one big reason was they fit the profile that I like. I tried hitting the T200 and couldn’t get anything on them to save my life, but then again, I’m not a player that responds well to a smaller, less offset profile. I’m very happy with the T300, and had to laugh when, shortly after getting them, the next-gen T series was spotted in the bags at whatever tour event was happening. The real difference between the T300 and the T350 is $57. Per iron head. So, I’m good with what I have.

      Reply

      Scott

      3 months ago

      Thanks for the review, very interesting article. My question is how to deal with the 43 degree PW? Are you not then needing a 5th wedge for some consistent gapping?

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      3 months ago

      It is a bit problematic. With my previous irons, I had a large gap between my 9-iron and my PW. We fixed that with the T350 by moving to the set matched PW instead of the 46-degree Vokey. Now I have a similar issue between the PW and GW and that leaves me with a dead zone at +/- 125 yards. My season is over, so I don’t need to worry about it right now, but if the 350s continue in the bag, I’ll probably replace my 50 with a 48 and keep constant 6-degree gaps between wedges.

      Reply

      Darren Lee

      2 weeks ago

      Tony, great insight. Did any other irons come into play when you settled on T350 – ZX4 MkII come to mind or even JPX923? insights of your decision making process would be great as I am looking to get a new set this spring.

      ole gray

      3 months ago

      Great job Tony!

      As you may know, I have the T350s and they have produced some awesome results for me. Sure there are no irons made that are high score proof however the T350s provide me the comfort that I have the best chance to play well. I had three rounds in the 70s which were back to back to back with these irons which is something I’ve never done. Made me a believer!

      Reply

      Mike

      3 months ago

      Interesting article. I think more golfers s/b playing more forgiving irons than they currently play. Because I usually play as a single, I play w/ many different folks. I don’t see a ton of great iron-strikers, yet I do see too many people playing irons that are meant for a better player than they are. Not sure if that’s ego or ignorance, but I do know that’s costing them strokes.

      For me, the most important thing with my irons (& alll my clubs) is maintaining proper gaps. I think the stronger lofts these days is laughable; what’s the real gain when now you have to carry 2 gap wedges to keep your gaps consistent.

      The only downside about all these new OEM equipment is that they’ve so damn expensive. So when I make club purchase decisions, it’s for the long term.

      Reply

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