PXG Xtreme Golf Ball
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PXG Xtreme Golf Ball

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PXG Xtreme Golf Ball
  • PXG has released its first product in the golf ball category.
  • The PXG Xtreme golf ball has three-piece urethane construction.
  • Suitable for a range of players, PXG says the Xtreme is “one ball that does it all.”
  • Retail price is $39.99. Available now.


PXG Founder and CEO Bob Parsons has stated: “Everything we [PXG] do starts with a question: ‘Can we make a better product?’”

As it relates to golf balls, for the better part of PXG’s existence, the answer was “no.”

A Slick Failure

When PXG engineers Brad Schweigert and Mike Nicolette left PING for PXG, certain contractual entanglements prohibited them from jumping right into golf club design. Instead, they spent their early PXG days working on a golf ball.

The result of those efforts was the Slick golf ball (I don’t recall why the one shown below is on a stick—probably some aerodynamics thing) and the mythology around its shortcomings have become the stuff of PXG lore.

A photo of the unreleased Slick Golf Ball

Suffice it to say the Slick ball never made it to retail.

Nevertheless, PXG persisted.

Parsons continues: “We didn’t stop trying. Adding a new partner to expand our engineering capabilities and leveraging years of data and testing, we are pleased and proud to finally introduce a golf ball good enough to earn the PXG name.”

PXG Xtreme Golf Ball Construction

A photo of a deconstructed PXG Xtreme 3-piece golf ball.

Starting with basics: the PXG Xtreme is three-piece ball with an injection-molded 338-dimple aerodynamics package (aka “cover”). The balls are produced in Vietnam.

Fans of MyGolfSpy’s Ball Lab might already be narrowing down the factory list in their heads so I’ll add that 338 is not a particularly common dimple count. Bridgestone and Srixon both have 338-dimple patterns but neither has a factory in Vietnam.

There are a few other 338-dimple balls of note on the USGA’s conforming ball list. You may not be familiar with the first but all of Aerium’s conforming balls have 338-dimple covers.

The other, the Kirkland Signature Performance+, is produced in Vietnam.

Thinking emoji.

the core of the PXG Xtreme golf ball

As we’ve pointed out before, it’s not uncommon for factories to reuse the same dimple pattern on multiple golf balls. With that in mind, it’s not shocking that, on close examination, my assessment is that the dimple pattern on the PXG Xtreme Golf ball is consistent with the Kirkland.

For what it’s worth, the PXG cover is a significantly brighter white.

To be clear, I’m not suggesting the PXG ball is a re-stamped Kirkland. The under-the-cover stuff is unique to PXG and I’m confident the company wouldn’t release a ball that spins as much as the Kirkland. Though, I suppose, it would be fair to characterize the spin properties of the Kirkland as extreme.

In classic PXG fashion, the layers are the ball are colored red, white and blue, although, if all the layers were black, it would also be on-brand.

PXG Xtreme Golf Ball – Who is it For?

PXG Xtreme Golf balls in their sleeves

At this point, you’re probably wondering about the performance characteristics of the golf ball. Seriously, who is it for?

With PXG Xtreme ball, the company is taking what I call the Lord of the Rings approach: One ball to rule them all or, as PXG says, “One ball that does it all.”

Either works.

Simply, the objective was to create a ball that works for every golfer without any tradeoffs. It’s my responsibility to remind you that there’s always a tradeoff. What PXG has described sure looks like a middle-of-the-bell-curve urethane offering.

The approach is rooted in PXG’s thinking that ball fitting is overly complicated and a good bit of what golfers have been told over the years about golf ball performance isn’t exactly true.

Preach.

ad copy for the PXG Xtreme Golf Ball

PXG’s test data suggests that even for relatively slow swing speed golfers (call it +/-85 mph), low-compression golf balls are shorter off the tee and typically spin less around the green than firmer ones.

It’s a not-so-catchy way of saying that soft is slow and soft often doesn’t spin.

Basically, the idea of fitting a ball based on swing speed is flawed and so, rather than add to the confusion, the company decided to offer a single model that’s going to work pretty well for just about everyone.

If you’re going to launch a performance-driven golf ball franchise with a single model, it makes sense to start with something that’s firm enough that high swing speed players won’t over-compress and lose distance and maybe just soft enough that slower swing speed players will tolerate the feel because it spins more around the green than the low-compression stuff they’ve been told is right for their swing speed.

From a compression standpoint, the goal of the PXG Xtreme golf ball was to split the difference between the Pro V1 and the Pro V1x. In preliminary testing, the PXG Xtreme ball measures +/- 97 on our gauge which matches the last two generations of Pro V1x.

That would certainly explain why PXG says it’s as fast as the Pro V1x though, with the thicker cover, golfers may find the PXG ball feels softer.

PXG Extreme Golf Ball Performance Testing

A chart showing how the PXG Xtreme Golf Ball performed in Golf Labs testing

PXG says its new Xtreme golf ball is as good or better than anything on the market. As you would expect, it’s offering some data to support those claims.

In independent testing conducted by Golf Labs, the PXG ball was six yards longer than a Pro V1 and just a tick shorter than the Pro V1x. It was a touch faster than both as well.

While there are arguments to be made in PXG’s favor, a good bit of the data doesn’t so much indicate better or worse as it does the subtle performance distinctions between golf balls.

And so, with that, I’ll refer you back to the earlier point about golf ball fitting being complicated.

Additional advantages for the PXG Xtreme ball, as well as performance distinctions, can be found in the iron and wedge data as well.

The requisite disclaimer in all of this is that the industry has been showing me these Golf Lab reports across multiple categories for years. It’s not going to surprise anyone to learn that the home team (the company that commissioned the test) has a win percentage that would make the Harlem Globetrotters blush.

My take is that the data is interesting, perhaps, but it’s nothing we haven’t seen half a dozen times before in the ball category alone.

And as I’ve said before: the challenge in the golf ball category isn’t in creating a design that performs well. Given the USGA constraints, nearly every factory can do that.

Sure, there are niche offerings that fit a smaller percentage of golfers but objectively bad golf balls are few and far between. It’s the ability to produce the same ball on spec over and over (and over) again that is often the biggest differentiator between brands.

PXG Xtreme Ball – On Course

a pair of PXG Xtreme Golf Balls

PXG’s other supporting insights are largely anecdotal.

To my knowledge, PXG’s Mike Nicolette is the only engineer currently working in the golf industry who has won on the PGA TOUR. Nico won at Bay Hill in ’83 and, while he maybe doesn’t move the ball over the course like he once did, he’s still got plenty of game.

“[The PXG ball] has better trajectory and spin control than anything I’ve ever hit,” says Nicolette. “It’s as good or better than any golf ball I’ve ever played in my life.”

In on-course testing, Nicolette says, “a Titleist golf ball has not caught up to a PXG ball yet.”

The obvious caveat here, and Nicolette acknowledges as much, is that, as a PXG employee, golfers may not be inclined to take his word for it.

The requisite advice is to try the PXG ball yourself—and the motivation to do so may be found in the price point.

Pricing and Availability

A closeup of the sidestamp on the PXG Xtreme golf ball

According to PXG’s Brad Schweigert, “the only reason not to play a urethane-covered ball is because of price.” FYI: Pretty much everyone making a golf ball says the same thing. The only reason ionomer balls exist is because a segment of golfers doesn’t want to pay urethane prices.

I get that, and PXG gets that, which is why it wants to remove price as an obstacle.

With a retail price of $39.99, I’m not sure the company has done that entirely. Before the volume discounts offered by the other guys, that’s still about $5 higher than most direct-to-consumer brands.

That said, 40 bucks is no doubt appealing for PXG loyalists and inarguably presents a value proposition relative to the big guys. Your full market context here: a dozen PXG Xtreme golf balls is $15 less than the new Pro V1, $13 less than the TaylorMade TP5 and $10 less than most everyone else.

As I said, that’s likely a big enough discount for some but it might not move the needle for the guys willing to pay $40 for an ionomer cover from a brand they know or the guys spending $25 for a K-Sig double dozen.

My personal feeling is that at $29.99 or less, the PXG Xtreme ball would be disruptive. At $40, price in and of itself probably isn’t reason enough.

The PXG Xtreme Golf Ball is billed as one ball that does it all.

PXG Xtreme Golf Ball – Final Thoughts

I can’t promise you the PXG Xtreme golf ball is going to perform “like a gymnast wearing a jet pack getting fired through a howitzer.” Frankly, I’m still trying to unpack that and figure out if that’s a good thing but a urethane ball at $39.99 from a brand with a following will garner some interest.

The PXG Extreme golf ball will be sold through PXG.com, PXG retail locations and Amazon. Shipping through PXG.com will be $7.50 per dozen for orders under $100. Spend more than that and shipping is free.

Again, the retail price is $39.99 ($34.99 for the PXG Heroes program). Available now.

For more information, visit PXG.com.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Albie Cat

      1 year ago

      This ball sounds like a rich man’s Oncore Elixir, just sayin’……

      Reply

      Bill Smith

      10 months ago

      I drank the PXG koolade and ordered a box. Used them the other day, very disappointed. Less distance, less spin, less everything. It certainly isn’t a Titleist or a Taylormade. Called PXG customer service and they will refund the purchase price of the three sleeves I shipped back.

      You have to wonder the quality of a company’s products (mostly clubs from drivers to putters) when they constantly lower the price.

      Reply

      10shot

      8 months ago

      Well said, I say the same. Junk ball

      Greg

      1 year ago

      TXG evaluated them inside and out. Matty didn’t feel or see a significant difference between PXG and ProV1X balls. Since I’m eligible for the Hero’s program, I’m definitely interested. If you just hate PXG for it’s name, I’ll take your lunch money.

      Reply

      Steve

      1 year ago

      Quick aside: Costco’s double-dozen Kirkland balls went up to $28 about a year ago. Still an incredible value, but since you mentioned the old $25 price point, I think it’s appropriate to bring up.

      Reply

      Joseph Kingbee

      1 year ago

      Love them or hate them, they make a good product and they are (god I hate to use this word but) disrupting the industry.

      Reply

      10shot

      8 months ago

      I played the PXG ball, I’d swear on the Holly Bible it’s Made by Top Flight. Hard, lifeless feeling rubber ball with an ungodly sound. Just like a Top Flight

      Reply

      Handicap Police

      1 year ago

      Why isn’t it made in the USA????? It’s PXG, aint it? So why?
      So PXG wants to make their balls for dirt cheap and sell them to you at 600% mark-up.
      Pathetic. And hypocritical as expected. No different to any company that wants to do the same. Make cheap in a foreign land, sell high at home.
      Don’t buy their junk. Don’t help them.

      Reply

      Made in america police?

      1 year ago

      Be Kind and don’t judge me for playing made in Japan Mizunos. Titleist balls for consumers are made in their Thailand factory. Just saying. The US Flags are made in China and the US soldiers buy their uniforms for hundreds of dollars but are made by inmates at pennies on the dollar. It’s called capitalism. Anyways I digress since I’m lucky to get my ProV1s for free and replace them once their cover is scuffed which is about 36 holes max under normal play if I’m lucky enough to miss a tree or cart path. :( I’ll still give this a try once I find one on the course. The US. Air Force golf team is sponsored by PXG so I’m sure I’ll find one to test. Cheers

      Reply

      Marc

      1 year ago

      Correction: Titleist has two plants in the USA ant is where all their ionomer clover balls are made and 2/3 of their urethane covered balls. Half the production at the Thai plant are sold in Asia. The Thai plant does not have the same production capacity as BPIII.

      Jay

      12 months ago

      That’s an absolute lie, Titleist golf balls are are made in America, and they’re made by Titleist, not a Vietnam ball factory. Titleist has a ball plant in Thailand to make cast urethane balls for the Asian and European markets, the plant in America cannot make enough balls for every customer on earth.
      How many your pros play PXG balls they claim “as good or better than a Pro V1/Pro V1x”? 0 , NONE, that alone speaks volumes.

      SNOWMAN

      1 year ago

      I am a big fan of PXG. When I learned about the company. I booked a fitting and never experienced such an incredible level of customer service through the whole process when I went all in on a bag of GEN4s a year ago.

      I used ProV1’s in 95% of shots I hit last season, and that ball was recommended to me by my PXG fitter.. I was able to pull off some incredible golf shots that still make a deep impression on me long after. I know when I fork out the bucks that I am going to get a consistent golf ball. Tests here at MyGolfSpy prove the consistency.

      I want to believe in this golf ball. I struggle with the idea of gaming it.

      I don’t like the fact that this is manufactured in the same facility as the Kirkland ball in Vietnam, from a supply chain aspect. I was a Snell buyer until Dean ran into issues there. Being involved with purchasing, I know the supply chain is still a mess and will be for a while. I am not going to buy a golf ball, adjust to it, and then can’t get them.

      I question how consistent the ball is going to be. All with all of the ball splitting done on this platform indicates one thing over the years: it’s tough to beat a Titleist.

      Bob, I know you read these comments. I can’t do it yet, man. I really want to in my heart, but the brain says not yet. I need assurance on supply AND consistency here before I even try it.

      I love your commitment to philanthropy. I love your commitment to veterans. I love your attitude. I love your golf clubs. I will continue to support the company in other ways. Thank you for what you do.

      Reply

      John

      1 year ago

      Three dozen with the Hero discount is a great deal. Now if they live up to the hype, and I have a feeling they will. Can’t wait to try them out.

      Reply

      daja

      1 year ago

      Another best ball… what a surprise I get it that tech data allows us to know what we are playing or perhaps shoud be . My question is this, do all the responders have some sort of device that accurately measures club speed and ball spin? I don’t and have no idea what ball is better for me. I usually play Bridgestone B RX or Maxfli equvivalent 3 piece. I don’t loose many so I could play Titleist…lol but it galls me to spend 50 buck or so for balls when there are so many choices. I have not found that one ball is so much better. If I got a sleeve of TaylorMades, Callaway, Srixon, I’d be fine, i’d say, for the average golfer, most name brands are all pretty good. Remember, it ain’t the arrow, it’s the archer.

      Reply

      Jay

      12 months ago

      Why don’t you just admit that you’re not willing to pay top dollar for the best, that’s what it comes down to, and if you’re not good enough to notice the difference between a cast urethane balls and injection molded cover, you’ll never get it.
      Titleist owns their manufacturing plants and every step from R&D to quality checks to packaging costs money. More pros at every tour play Titleist, and none of them are playing an inferior ball just to get paid, specially when you consider that a large portion of what many players make is determined by where they finish in the tournament.

      Reply

      Adrian J Cemel

      1 year ago

      In the recesses of our minds knowing PXG at its infancy, Slick (Willy) would rise as a phoenix in the Scottsdale sun

      Reply

      CK

      1 year ago

      Look like the CUT golf ball graphics.

      Reply

      James

      1 year ago

      These are now on sale in the UK. £44.99 a dozen.
      I can buy 2022 Pro V1 for the same price.

      Reply

      Mike

      1 year ago

      I like what PXG has done the last few seasons although I’m a little skeptical about “one ball that does it all”. Some players need more spin, some less, some a high trajectory, some low and sound and feel is very subjective. We’ll see how this goes.

      Reply

      Jim

      1 year ago

      Have you started your lab tests on these? Looking forward to understanding the consistency. If it’s high, these may well be worth it at $10-$15 less than competitors.

      Reply

      Paul

      1 year ago

      As a ball nerd, I’m going to give these a try. A urethane ball in the “goldilocks zone” might be the ticket to getting around the course in less shots than the guys. Which means they’ll pay for themselves in skins so this is my kind of ball. PXG balls, a sugar daddy wedge, a cigar and I’m good to go, just like Bob. Thanks PXG!

      Reply

      Mike

      1 year ago

      For the past 15 years I’ve play Pro V1’s (usually new ones) that I’ve found. But if I had to buy balls, I’d frequent the secondary market or go the Vice route.

      Reply

      cleve00

      1 year ago

      If it looks like a duck, but does it swim and quack like a duck? Only MGS can say…. K-SIG2 clone?

      Reply

      Jeff G

      1 year ago

      $34.99 for heros.
      Same as 2023 Maxfli

      Reply

      Kyle

      1 year ago

      There’s no way in hell I’m paying $55 for a box of prov1’s anymore. That’s $4.50 per ball. No thanks. I’ll give PXG a try. ????????

      Reply

      13jas

      1 year ago

      When they make yeller 1,s, I`ll give`m a try

      Reply

      Tom Terrific

      1 year ago

      I am not surprised that few professional players hit Yellow colored balls, but PXG should bring out the Yellow, just like Cold Play says…Please bring out Yellow!

      Reply

      Kris

      1 year ago

      Oh, what a thing to do
      And it was all yellow

      flushem

      1 year ago

      prolly Asian market will be all over this ball. PXG is HUGE in Asia.

      Reply

      Danno

      1 year ago

      Maxfli Tour X….$70 for 2 dozen….thank you.

      Reply

      Michael Feland

      1 year ago

      With EVERYTHING golf going up in price, I appreciate that PXG is trying to not empty my wallet. That being said, SAMs just starting selling a 24-pack of Vice Pro golf balls for $50. Maxfli Tour is still a great deal at Dick’s. Might try PXG, but the Maxfli and Vice balls will get my money for now.

      Reply

      Kyle Sinclair

      1 year ago

      With the Hero’s program, I will definitely be giving them a go…
      Thank you Mr Parsons!

      Reply

      Mark R

      1 year ago

      $39.99 plus Shipping

      Net/net – within a coupe bucks of a ProV1.

      For sure I’ll give the PXG ball a try, but it’s not really a cost savings. Ay 97 compression, I bet it flies far.

      Reply

      Jason S

      1 year ago

      Always a good article from Tony. Granted, he loves his Titleist more than his kids. ;-)
      It’s an interesting product release in a very crowded market. I like my Maxfli Tour X due to it’s price, performance, and availability. I may give these a go once they have their first sale and bring the cost down to actually compete with the other DTC’s.

      Reply

      Joey K

      1 year ago

      I think its funny that there are so many PXG haters out there. Call it what you will, but they have a quality product . .

      Reply

      Bob

      1 year ago

      I work a course and I’m sure that I will have an opportunity to get a few new used PXG balls. If they perform as stated I might be a convert.

      Reply

      Wilson Player

      1 year ago

      I noticed a few comments on PXG golfers will run out and get these because they love the PXG brand (or hat)
      I don’t know if I buy that. I switched over to PXG for most of the bag because of how well they preformed and great attention to detail on the fitting.
      I believe most people, who care about what ball they pay for, won’t switch unless it outperforms their regular ball.
      Breaking into the ball market is not going to be easy.
      I could see them getting these into all their fitting studios, subscription deals when you buy new clubs (a new dozen a month auto-ship thing..) and trying to get new players hooked.

      Reply

      John R

      1 year ago

      What I look for as an 18 HC player is low spin off the driver and some spin near the green. I used to play value golf balls or found ProV1s until a Titleist rep gave me a sleeve of Tour Speed and one of AVX to compare. Ended up liking the AVX based on the feel of the cast urethane cover of the AVX vs the injection molded Tour Speed. Never would have picked the AVX on my own so am in agreement about over-complexity applied to ball fitting. By the same token unending comparisons to ProV1 and its offshoots are of limited value as a lot of people really shouldn’t play that ball (score one for marketing). I think most mid to high handicappers would likely be better with a low driver spin ball that has predictable roll out with a wedge (because if we spin the ball it’s a fluke or the green is as soft as a sponge).
      From there it’s a question of preference for feel off the club face and $.
      Too many tables of spin numbers and comparisons to balls best left to better players make my head hurt. I just want to know if it’s straight, predictably consistent and hard/medium/soft feel.
      But I love the lab info.

      Reply

      Chappy

      1 year ago

      Totally agree the $40 doesn’t move the needle but $30 would. I play Snell MTB-X for the quality/price ratio, but I’d go to Maxfli Tour or Vice Pro/Plus if they continue to have supply issues. I’d even throw the PXG in there if it undercutted the other guys.

      Reply

      HAC

      1 year ago

      Given how prices for PXG clubs jump around, I expect we will see sales for the PXG golf ball and it could well be available for $30 around Memorial Day or Fourth of July, etc.

      Last year I mostly played with a Pro V1 or a Maxfli Tour. I have been thinking about trying Ping’s app to get thoughts on whether I am playing the correct golf ball.

      Reply

      James Shepard

      1 year ago

      That thick urethane cover sure looks like Kirkland’s ball. Discounted 50% within a year.

      Reply

      Hopp

      1 year ago

      I am sure I will find one as the PXG fans will be out in force, then I will give it to someone else.

      Reply

      Eric

      1 year ago

      I was previously a Snell Black guy, but a prolonged manufacturer lack of supply and shipping cost drove me to Maxfli. That being said, this price point plus shipping will not get me to change from Maxfli Tour. You simply can’t beat walking into a local Dicks with your rewards coupon and walking out with some great balls at a fair price. That being said, I agree, price point (plus shipping) will need to be lower to be considered a disrupter in the already flooded market.

      Reply

      Matthew

      1 year ago

      Would you try them once they reach Amazon, which I would assume if you have prime would have free shipping?

      Reply

      Eric

      1 year ago

      If the price was better than Dicks to my front door, I might give them a shot. However, at the same price point or higher, there is not a perceived performance advantage drawing me away from my current MaxFli Tour. I am happy to be proven wrong on this perception with real data, but would then need to weigh that benefit personally from a cost/ball perspective..

      Again, this release would have had a lot more legs if they actively undercut pricing with comparable DTC or Dicks competitors. With performance being very close between ProV1/MF Tour/Snell Black/PXG (maybe), the only differentiator for my part of the market segment is price. I game a PXG driver and 3W and really like these products, but I personally am still driven more by price than brand loyalty.. I won’t pay $5 dollars more for a dozen balls so my ball logo can match my driver headcover.

      Matthew

      1 year ago

      I just ordered three dozen. Why not give it a shot? Also like supporting American-made businesses in the process.

      Reply

      Sandy

      1 year ago

      These balls are not made in the USA, but Bridgestone and Titleist are.

      Reply

      JG

      1 year ago

      Its not american made. LOL

      Reply

      Mark

      1 year ago

      He posted American business, not ball.

      HAC

      1 year ago

      Titleist is an American business. Is Bridgestone?

      If you count PXG as American because the business is American, wouldn’t a lot of other golf balls also be American? For example, isn’t Callaway an American business?

      Tony Covey

      1 year ago

      • Titleist balls for the US market are primarily made in Massachusetts. When demand exceeds supply (as it did for most of the last couple of years), some of the product made at the company’s plant in Thailand makes it to the US market.
      • Bridgestone balls for the US market are primarily made in Georgia. It’s not unheard of for some Japanese product to make it over here when demand exceeds supply.
      • Callaway Chrome Soft balls are made in Massachusetts. The company’s other products are made in Taiwan.
      • TaylorMade applies the covers of its urethane balls in South Carolina. Cores and mantles are made at company facilities in both Taiwan and Korea.

      That’s it. Everything else is produced overseas. Making a golf ball is difficult. Making it consistently is harder still. Best left to the experienced.

      MarkM

      1 year ago

      Will be curious about the ball data, but @ $40 + shipping I can’t see it making much of a dent in the market. Give me $35 and free shipping then I’d give it a try.

      Reply

      John O

      1 year ago

      Looks to me like the Ball Lab data for mid speed driver on the PXG lines right up with the spin number you guys reported for the Kirkland in the 2021 test. 2700 RPM.

      Reply

      Cody

      1 year ago

      Excellent article. I would be hard pressed to believe this will be anything ground breaking, and the similarities with the Kirkland cannot be ignored. Will withhold judgement for more concrete data.

      Keep up the excellent work!

      Reply

      RealDeal717

      1 year ago

      Will these be available in yellow?

      Reply

      Dean

      1 year ago

      This ball is very intriguing. Good or bad, I am quickly becoming a PXG truther, and would seriously consider this ball. I have a Gen 5 driver, the 0211 3-wood and 0211 irons. I typically stick with Callaway, but with the exception of the Super Soft, the spin numbers are high for me with driver. I see confusion in the marketplace with regard to what ball is right for me, and I am a golf equipment junkie. How is the average golfer going to know?

      Reply

      Jeff

      1 year ago

      Any sense on spin numbers? The comparison chart vs the Pro V1/V1X doesn’t have spin included.

      Reply

      Dave R

      1 year ago

      They had a spin chart on the PXG website. Spins a little more than both ProV1s off the wedge, in between the two off an iron, and more than both by a decent margin off the driver. I’d be happy to give these a try at that price point, but the driver spin would be bad news for me.

      Reply

      Carolyn

      1 year ago

      Why not I see more and more people with PXG clubs I would be willing to bet a big percentage of them will love a PXG ball just as they love their PXG hat. I still remember playing my Zing irons with Ping golf balls as kid thinking the Ping clubs needed a Ping (two color too) ball.

      Reply

      Francis

      1 year ago

      I currently play PXG irons. Not sure I’d jump to buy their balls.

      IMHO, there are already too many golf balls on the market, between the big-name brands (each offering 10-20 different golf ball models) and the dozens of DTC brands, my head is already spinning.

      Reply

      Scott

      1 year ago

      When the sale starts, I am all over them
      Of course, that could be any minute now

      Reply

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