Taylormade P770, P7MB & P7MC Iron Reviews
Irons

Taylormade P770, P7MB & P7MC Iron Reviews

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Taylormade P770, P7MB & P7MC Iron Reviews

With the golf equipment market booming, TaylorMade is pushing ahead with the release of its three new P7 series irons – the P7MB, P7MC and the P770.

Just one guy’s opinion here but, frankly, the first two look like solid-enough designs elevated by descriptive language borrowed heavily from Mizuno’s linguistic playbook. The third, the P770, offers a simple story but packs a powerful punch that could redefine a category that has perhaps lost its way.

Each of the three models targets the better player, though there’s some wiggle room with the P770. Its market appeal should prove to be orders of magnitude higher than the other two (probably combined), so let’s start there.

TaylorMade P770

A TayloreMade P770 Iron as featured on a review blog post

TaylorMade’s tagline for P770 is Let the Sibling Rivalry Begin. That rivalry is with the P790 which is, by any reasonable measure, P770’s big brother. P770 has got Speed Foam, tungsten weighting (up to 46 grams) and Thru Slot Speed Pockets. Cosmetically, the design is cleaner than P790 (“clean” is a theme across all of TaylorMade’s new irons) but the shape is similar, though smaller enough to matter.

In nearly every respect, the P770 is P790’s Mini-Me and I say that with the greatest of admiration for what TaylorMade has done with this iron and for the category in which it fits.

That category is “player’s distance” and while I might be getting ahead of myself (P770 isn’t even on shelves yet), I believe it has the potential to be a category-redefining iron.

A TaylorMade P770 Iron lying on its side that has been review

My thinking goes back to the Titleist T100S and the idea of putting the player back in the player’s distance category. As the category has evolved, designs have shifted to the point where the majority over-emphasizes distance at the expense of the size and shape preferred by the better player. With each passing season, the player’s distance category moves closer to something that could be labeled “nicer-looking game-improvement clubs”.

What I like about the TaylorMade approach and why I think it will resonate with the target golfer is that while it reemphasizes the player, the design remains true to what I think the player’s distance category should be. P770 is a high-tech, hollow-body (including goo-filled design) that emphasizes speed and distance while retaining a compact, eye-pleasing footprint.

Call it getting back to your roots; P770 could signal the rest of the industry to press reset on their player’s distance designs.

TaylorMade P770 versus P790

Two TaylorMade P770 Irons that will be reviewed

TaylorMade has fitted golfers with handicaps from plus-4 to 25 into P790. Appealing to a spread of golfers that broad is how you lay claim to the No. 1 position in the category. Across those P790 players, 30 percent have a handicap of seven or better. Those better golfers represent the meaty part of the TaylorMade P770 target demographic.

TaylorMade expects the average P770 buyer will be around a five handicap. There’s no floor, as the compact size should appeal to plus handicaps. And while the smaller design skews towards the better player, the expectation is that plenty of 15 handicaps will choose P770.

The top of Two TaylorMade P770 Irons waiting to be reviewed

That’s not a stretch. There are plenty of 15s who choose to play blades so this strikes me as a better option.

As always, your mileage may vary, but TaylorMade says that despite the smaller package, P770 keeps up with P790 yard for yard, though it’s reasonable to assume you can expect some fall off in forgiveness.

TaylorMade P770 Specs

The Hot sheet for the reviews of the TaylorMade P770 Irons

Know Your Audience

Across the new P-Series lineup, you’ll find plenty of Mizuno-esque language to describe the aesthetics of the new models. High buff satin designs are clean and elegant. Nothing will look out of place next to your finest flatware.

I joke, but this attention to aesthetic detail (and the promotion thereof) across the new lineup suggests TaylorMade is making a concerted effort to appeal to the better player. It’s speaking the language or, at a minimum, telling that player precisely what he wants to hear. From the MB to the P770, designs are clean, lines flow and light contrasts with dark to make each of the products more visually intriguing.

Three taylormade P770 Irons that will be Reviewed

TaylorMade’s performance is seldom in doubt which leaves the task of further elevating the brand resting on TaylorMade’s ability to connect with the discerning golfer who appreciates attention to the smallest details.

TaylorMade describes the P7MC and P7MB as meticulously crafted contemporary takes on classic designs. It’s perhaps a bit of an oversell but I’ll concede what follows is some of the company’s best work in the better player space.

TaylorMade P7MB

A Taylormade P7MB Iron that will be reviewed

At face value, the P7MB might seem a curious release. TaylorMade already has the P7TW (Tiger Woods Blade) and, for the most part, a blade is a blade. What differences exist between any two in the market typically boil down to the finer details of shape – the shape of the toe flows to the topline, the thickness of the topline, that sort of thing.

Pair that with the reality that blade sales are so minimal that they could get lost in a rounding error in the monthly market share report and TaylorMade’s decision to roll out a second blade is more than a little unusual.

TaylorMade’s justification for blade No. 2 is that, on specs alone, Tiger’s irons aren’t for everyone (you don’t say!) and so it needs a mainstream blade (insomuch as such a thing exists) that’s separate from Tiger’s iron.

The Top of a TaylorMade P7MB iron that will be reviewed

It’s also true in that an effort to position the P7TW as a premium, TaylorMade offers it only as a full set to address the needs of golfers who want to buy a few blades as part of a combo set, something else had to come to market.

So that gets us P7MB, and because TaylorMade pays its tour staff big money so you can bet it’s going to lean on them for some input into the design.

To that end, P7MB blade lengths are a bit longer than the P730 but it’s consistent throughout the set. That came from feedback from Dustin Johnson. Rory wanted less offset. Apparently, everyone agreed to keep the sole geometry largely the same.

Three taylormade P770 Irons that will be Reviewed viewed from the top

Compact Grain Forging

TaylorMade is touting a new forging process for P7 MC. It’s called Compact Grain Forging – a phrase that bears a passing similarity to Mizuno’s Grain Flow Forging HD. The critical detail in the TaylorMade approach is that it’s a five-step process that leverages a 2,000-ton press to pound the clubhead into its final shape. For context, TaylorMade says that’s two to three times heavier than standard forging equipment. By Compact Grain Forging 1025 steel, TaylorMade can better control the structure of the micrograins, which results in the best possible feel.

(Pause for chin scratch.)

As with most any other blade, the trade-off curves offer you workability and control at the expense of forgiveness. While the P7MB looks pretty, unless I’ve mentioned you by name in this story, you probably have no business buying more than three of them.

TaylorMade P7MB Specs

The Hot sheet for the reviews of the TaylorMade P7MB Irons

TaylorMade P7MC

TaylorMade P7MC Iron ready to be reviewd

For every blade on the market, there’s invariably a more sensible cavity-back alternative and so here you go. With the P7MC, you still get the compact design that many players crave. You get some workability, too. And while it’s not nearly as forgiving as anything in the SIM iron family or P-anything else without TW or MB in the name, you get a little bit of forgiveness by way of perimeter weighting on the off chance you don’t quite hit the sweet spot.

Closeup of a TaylorMade P7MC Iron ready to be reviewed

Like the P7MB, the P7MC is Compact Grain Forged from 1025 carbon steel. The cavity detailing reminds me of some of TaylorMade’s older RAC stuff. The contrast between the cavity and perimeter finishes makes for an aesthetically pleasing package. One of the more intriguing details is the T-Bug (the TaylorMade Logo). It’s forged into the design and has a high-polish finish that really makes it pop. TaylorMade says it speaks to the craftsmanship of the design.

The rest of the design is boilerplate for the category. Offset remains minimal. The topline is thin. The intent is to pair seamlessly with the P7MB in a combo set.

TaylorMade P7MC Specs

The TaylorMade P7MC Specs review sheet

Combo Sets Made Easy

The majority of clubs outside the game-improvement category are designed to be mixed and matched to provide targeted performance in a way that a single set sometimes can’t. To make assembling your perfect set of TaylorMade irons a bit easier, the company has created a really cool guide. Broken down by the level of forgiveness you’re looking for, TaylorMade provides loft adjustment recommendations for pretty much every reasonable combination of P-Series irons. Even if you’re not planning to buy TaylorMade irons, it’s worth checking out for general guidance on gapping irons.

The Complete TaylorMade Iron review sheet
Click Here to Download the P Series Combo Guide

Golf clap, guys.

TaylorMade P770, P7MB, and P7MC Pricing and Availability

Three TaylorMade Irons on a table

The TaylorMade P770, P7MB and P7MC are available for pre-order Aug. 14. Retail availability begins on Sept. 4. The retail price for all three models is $1,399. All three models are available for both right- and left-handed golfers.

For more information, visit TaylorMadeGolf.com.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Fiber

      3 years ago

      I got fitted last week for the p770 as I was attracted by their stunning look.
      Completely another world in terms of feel, compared to the previous model, my son’s gamer.
      Looking forward to have them in my bag, in a couple of weeks!

      Reply

      Brad

      3 years ago

      Question about the 770’s. How are they different from the TMBs? There is a lot of talk about how they are something revolutionary, but they look very similar; hollow-body cavity back that looks like a blade and has traditional lifts. How is it different?

      Reply

      gticlay

      4 years ago

      I’m absolutely selling off a body part not required for golf in order to buy a 3-P set of the P-7MC. I’ve been complaining that nobody makes a nice clean low offset players CB with no stickers on them for a long time now. The Titleist is/was close though it has a sticker on it. With the one exception of the missing milled grind soles (maybe if I ask really nice? Pleaaaaaaaassseeee), this is pretty much my dream TM iron. I played my best golf at the coolest courses with my lowest handicap with the R9TP clubs and I am hoping to better my best by the time I turn 50 in 2023. I’m hoping that these irons, if I save enough money (or get enough for one kidney) to buy in 2021, will be the ones to take me on this turning 50 journey. As you can tell, I can’t wait to hit them!

      Reply

      sam

      4 years ago

      so long as they feeeel good. in the past I’ve had difficulties with TM irons on 2 fronts, one being they felt a bit clunky, the other, for some reason I always felt like I had to hit them harder, could not trust the iron to do it’s job with the rhythm and swing I had. sold them for Srixon z785, which felt as good for me if not better than mizunos, . (a single HC and brake 75, a lot.)

      Reply

      mackdaddy9

      4 years ago

      They sound a lot like the MP 20 combos

      Reply

      Mike

      4 years ago

      Are there really that many “players” out there, or just a bunch of wannabe folks who in actuality really could use some more forgiveness in their irons. No matter what you may think, if you are a 14 index, you are not a “player”

      Reply

      Sherman

      4 years ago

      Best part of golf anyone can enjoy is playing the equipment you want and can afford…most people never break 75 more then once in their life, but the club companies still need us to keep them in business….99.8% of players are not getting clubs out of the tour OEM vans.

      Reply

      Joeg Voll

      4 years ago

      Your concern with how and what other “Players” spend their money on is quite Pretentious & Douchey. Worry about yourself, Clownboy.

      Reply

      dave

      3 years ago

      thats great if the weight inset to perimeter better and the clubs and thinner shape then alvis.

      so to reitterate price sucks, other player most likely

      Funkaholic

      4 years ago

      Somebody is very insecure about what toys other people buy. I am guessing there’s something wrong with your equipment.

      Reply

      cliff

      3 years ago

      Whenever I look at clubs to purchase I have yet to find any labels saying you’re not good enough for these irons. What they do have are price tags. If a 90 year old wants to buy a Lamborghini they don’t tell him he’s too old. Bottom line: you have the money, you buy what you want.

      Reply

      Calvin

      4 years ago

      Typically you want to counter the hosel mass with weights out on the toe. Instead, these irons look like they have mass removed from the toe. Where is the CG located on these irons? Are they still in the center? Or are the heel-side?

      Reply

      Dan

      4 years ago

      I would be interested to see how the 7MC and P770 compare to the P760s

      Reply

      Kansas King

      4 years ago

      These have a good look and are a direct copy of Mizuno. With that said, they are still a players iron that offers limited forgiveness. I would say I’m surprised companies are spending so much on players irons which represent a rather small portion of the market. My guess is that they’ve found that golfers, regardless of skill/need for forgiveness, care more about looks than playability. I’m a little shocked the lofts aren’t stronger but I suppose that is where the P790 fits in.

      Reply

      Dawg Golfer

      4 years ago

      Is the $1399 price for an 8 club set?

      Reply

      AZNGOLF

      4 years ago

      Yes, $175 a club basically.

      Reply

      Randy

      4 years ago

      Love the weaker lofts on these. 47 deg people reminds me of my dads set I first learned on. Love the look, even if it is similar to Mizuno. Very clean. Would love to play these, even though my ball striking needs work. The ability to combo is great. May be in my bag in the future.

      Reply

      ex007

      4 years ago

      Have played the original P790s for 2+ yrs and absolutely love them. Getting to be the time for a new set, but disappointed that (and somewhat curious how) the new gen P790 did so poorly in the last iron test.

      Tony, any opportunity to test and compare the P770s to, say, top 5 from the test? Yes, I’ll hit them before buying but am genuinely interested in how they stack up to their competitors.

      Reply

      Jordan

      4 years ago

      Whoever TM fired to move from the RSI and gimmicky junk and subsequently hired to get us to here… job well done sir.

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      4 years ago

      I think that guy actually got promoted, but yeah…there’s been a steady improvement from RSI to the first round of P-Series to where we are today.

      It was subtle, but the change started with the under-appreciated SLDR iron.

      Reply

      Mike

      4 years ago

      You hit it at the beginning…looks like a similar effort and thinking to the Mizuno MP20 series…right down to the catchy term for the forging…beautiful irons though…again…like the Mizunos…saw posts on 4 different sites This morning heralding the release…

      Reply

      David Lewis

      4 years ago

      Not a big TM iron fan but intrigued by these designs. Finally seeing a 47 degree PW again. Would definitely test if in market for player’s distance iron.

      Reply

      Scott

      4 years ago

      See TM havent got rid of the George Foreman grill with the P7MC….ugly as.

      As for their forging process…….sounds rather familiar to another brand…….get original FFS

      Reply

      Trevor

      3 years ago

      Calm down lol, you need to eat a snickers you whiney little girl

      Reply

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