Fiix Elbow Tennis Elbow Treatment Review
We Tried It

Fiix Elbow Tennis Elbow Treatment Review

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Fiix Elbow Tennis Elbow Treatment Review

There is a lot of cool gear in the golf equipment world that doesn’t always fit neatly into Most Wanted Tests or Buyer’s Guides. You still want to know how it performs. In our We Tried It series, we put gear to the test and let you know if it works as advertised.

What We Tried

Fiix Elbow, a tennis elbow treatment device that leverages established therapeutic practices in the comfort of your own home.

Your Fiix Elbow User

Tony Covey – resident jack-of-all-trades (and master of absolutely nothing) who missed out on the better part of six months of golf with a bad elbow. I can’t be the only one.

a photo of the sta active tennis elbow treatment device

How I Got Here

About a year and a half ago, I noticed stiffness in my right arm while lying in bed. The pain wasn’t intense; more of an I should stretch that kind of feeling.

Over time, the pain, which localized in my forearm, grew more constant. I edit a ton of pictures (golf clubs and occasionally the dogs and kid – in that order) in Adobe Lightroom. I’m talking dozens, sometimes more than a hundred at a time.

Something about the angle of the arm during the editing process was an absolute killer. I started needing stretch breaks every five images or so.

Initially, I thought playing golf was to blame for the problem, but in retrospect, I’m reasonably sure deskwork was the root cause.

Lawn Mowers and Claw Machines

The other nightmare scenario was mowing the lawn. Last year, I bought an EGO battery powered mower. Not having to buy gas seemed like a good idea at the time but when your muscles and tendons have gone to crap, the batteries get heavy fast.

Lifting them out of the charger requires a motion akin to a claw machine. Reach, clamp, lift … and wince.

At some point, the elbow became so bad I couldn’t swap a battery with my once-dominant arm. My wife would have to mow the lawn. As if that would ever happen.

Seriously … one time in 15 years. Is that too much to ask?

As summer rolled into fall, I couldn’t swing a golf club without pain (and more pain the next day). So other than a couple of fall manufacturer visits, I basically shut it down entirely.

Take a break. You’ll be fine by spring … that was my thinking.

…But I Don’t Play Tennis

By late November, things weren’t any better. It never occurred to me because I’d never experienced it before (and because the pain was predominantly in my forearm) but over Thanksgiving dinner, my brother’s father-in-law (an orthopedic surgeon) settled on tennis elbow as the most likely cause.

I don’t play tennis but fun fact, neither do the overwhelming majority of people with tennis elbow.

A week later, I went in for a cortisone shot. Injecting goo into irons makes them better so it makes perfect sense that it would make my arm better too.

The cortisone helped a little but not for long. By March, my elbow was still garbage. I’m a worst-case scenario guy so with COVID emerging as something to worry about, I didn’t really want to deal with physical therapy, another doctor visit or the prospect of surgery.

So, I tweaked the original plan. Rest, but this time stretch, too. Recovery is a thinking man’s game.

The “live with it and wait and see” approach wasn’t the worst. The rest wasn’t helping much but not doing anything wasn’t making it worse. At the time, golf courses were COVID-closed so I wasn’t missing much anyway.

The Fiix Elbow can help treat the symptoms of tennis elbow and resolve the condition entirely

Fiix Elbow  – My Intro

Early spring is a busy time at MyGolfSpy. The buying season is ramping up and lots of new toys are hitting the market. We’re talking to a lot of people about a lot of things.

I was on a call with a Minneapolis-area golf pro who wanted me to try his new swing-speed training aid. I told him I’d be happy to take a look, but …

He heard the same story I just told you and how I wasn’t doing much swinging (I skipped the part about my wife not mowing the lawn) and wasn’t sure if I’d be able to swing at all.

That’s when he said, “I’m going to put you in touch with my friend Tim.”

OK, Let’s Talk to Tim

Tim is Tim Porth, one of the founders of Octane Fitness. Having sold his elliptical business to fitness giant Nautilus, Tim and another Octane founder partnered with a pair of physical therapists to develop the Fiix Elbow.

Described as a tendinitis and tennis elbow recovery device, the Fiix Elbow by Stā Active replicates IASTM (instrument assisted soft tissue massage) treatments in the comfort of your own home.

Your one-sentence overview is that IASTM is a well-established and proven treatment that works by disrupting adhesions and scar tissue and increasing blood flow, which promotes healthy tissue growth.

I repeated my story to Tim. He thought the device his team developed might be able to help. Less than a week later, a grip strength tester, a prototype Fiix Elbow and, short of TaylorMade NDA, more paperwork than we typically deal with at MyGolfSpy arrived.

Talking to one guy about a training aid only to connect with another and ending up in a clinical trial might be the oddest confluence of events in my decade-plus at MGS but, whatever, it made for some quality discussion fodder on No Putts Given (at the time the company was called Sta Active), so it was worth it.

Frankly, I had no idea if the Fiix Elbow would work but since doing mostly nothing and stretching wasn’t really helping either, I figured,” What the hell?” So I strapped in (literally) for eight weeks of home therapy.

a jar of emollient (lube) for the Sta Active tennis elbow treatment device

Using the Fiix Elbow

Using the Fiix Elbow requires a little bit of lube and just 10 minutes of your time. I realize, for some of you, that’s just another Saturday night but the point is there’s not much complexity nor much of a time commitment involved: Ten minutes, three times a week (and a little bit of stretching) for eight weeks. Sit, stand, lay down; it doesn’t much matter.

On a side note, my wife wasn’t a big fan of the odor of the original lube. It was a formidable scent. Given its heavy Sex Panther kind of vibe, your Saturday nights almost certainly went better than mine for a while. The new formulation doesn’t sting the nostrils like the original.

Anyway…

Strap the Fiix Elbow to your bad arm and let it do its thing. You can vary the intensity by tightening the strap and by flexing your wrist. You can shift the Fiix Elbow around to target specific areas but mostly it just runs until it stops and you’re done.

Fiix Elbow – Worse Before It Gets Better

Tim warned me that the pain might get worse before it gets better and that proved to be true. The first couple of weeks were brutal. Swelling and pain persisted, and I definitely wasn’t swinging a club the next day. Banging away on the keyboard and mouse wasn’t particularly awesome either.

For a while, my previous “rest and do nothing” approach was looking like the better plan.

Real pain relief takes time, but by the end of Week 3, things were leveling off. By Week 5, my arm was starting to feel better and I was swinging golf clubs again.

Another three weeks followed by a two-week healing phase and I had officially completed my round of Fiix Elbow therapy. It feels entirely arbitrary to put a number on it but I’d say my elbow is 90 percent back to normal. Pain is no longer constant. I can play golf, edit photos and claw machine my lawnmower batteries with, at worst, minimal pain that hasn’t gotten worse as I’ve tried to DeChambeau my way to more distance with my driver.

Fiix Elbow – Typical Results

In the Phase 2 trial, the average Fiix Elbow user who completed the program showed a 69-percent improvement in grip strength, a 76-percent improvement in UEFI Score.

Tennis elbow pain can be so severe that some who experience it can’t sleep. Fortunately, I was never that bad. Still, my grip strength and UEFI scores improved by 71 percent and 25 percent, respectively, while my pain decreased by 38 percent.

With a Fiix Elbow by Stā Active production unit in hand (or on arm), I’ve just started another eight weeks with the hope of returning to 100-percent pain free.

A closeup image of the Sta Active tennis elbow treatment device

Skepticism is Warranted

My goal here is make you aware of a product that has made my life better. It’s not that I particularly enjoy mowing the lawn but claw-machining big batteries around isn’t a problem anymore and I’m ripping balls like Bryson. Well, fat and slow Bryson, but I think we should all agree that it still counts.

That said, I’m no stranger to the promise of voodoo cures and the hucksters who sell them.

At the annual PGA Merchandise Show, there’s always some fly-by-night, sketchy new thing in the “Health and Wellness” space. Full-body vibrating shakers, pulsating light gizmos, magic creams and the ongoing infestation of the electrode army looking to juice you at every opportunity; we’ve seen it all and, thankfully, we’ve seen most of it disappear.

What I like about Fiix Elbow by Stā Active is there’s none of that crystals and moonbeams mysticism crap. They tell you exactly what the Fiix Elbow does (it replicates a widely used and accepted treatment you’d get in a physical therapist’s office) and you can flip it over and see exactly how it works.

Seriously. It’s steel knobs on a revolving belt that massage your tendons. Toss in a battery, a timer and a strap, and that’s most of it.

I also appreciate that Tim and his team did things the right way. They ran legitimate trials. They have real data. The Fiix Elbow is an FDA-registered medical device.

You can pay for it with your Flexible Spending Account money. That can be particularly useful at the end of the year when we all typically load up on toothpaste and saline solution anyway.

The 90-day money-back guarantee adds a degree of security as well.

The Fiix Elbow can help relieve the swelling and pain associated with tennis elbow and golfer's elbow.

Fiix Elbow – I Hope You Never Need It

I hope you never experience tennis elbow and never need the Fiix Elbow. With that in mind, let me end this with a quick recommendation. Don’t get old. Just don’t do it. Staying young will prevent a lot of problems.

While you’re at it, eat lots of fiber. We can forgo the details but trust me on that one.

If, however, you happen to develop forearm or elbow joint pain, it’s worth discussing Fiix Elbow with a qualified medical professional to see if it could help you like it helped me.

The Fiix Elbow by Stā Active is available now. The retail price is $399.99.

UPDATE – Fiix Elbow Approved for Golfer’s Elbow

Since the time we originally posted this review, the Fiix Elbow has been approved for the treatment of golfer’s elbow. Fortunately, I haven’t needed it for that, but it’s nice option to have.

The Fiix Elbow device has been updated and is now supported by an app. The company has rolled out additional products, including a Cold Compression Sleeve, Elbow Brace, and a Tendon Strengthening Handle to its product offerings.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Caleb

      3 years ago

      After about 10 years of powerlifting, I’ve noticed I get the most pain in joints (elbows, hips, knees) when I play a round. Would like to test this and see if it’s worth using for recovery.

      Reply

      Theresa Lyman

      3 years ago

      I have tennis elbow in my left elbow. I had to have surgery on my right elbow six years ago. I don’t wanna have to go through surgery again because I missed a full year of golf. I would love to try that. Thank you so much for your consideration.

      Reply

      Ken Stevenson

      3 years ago

      I’ve been fighting both tennis and golfers elbow for 8 months. Done every excercise program and nothing works. Help!

      Reply

      Mike Casciola

      3 years ago

      I have been dealing with tennis elbow since November and all and any treatment I have tried has never got it to recover fully. My orthopedic just keeps telling me ice and throwing anti inflamatory pills at me. I would prefer something that is not a drug to fix this 4 month issue. I would love to be a tester.

      Reply

      Ivan Howars

      3 years ago

      Hey I’d love to be a tester I constantly suffer with Tennis Elbow the more I play golf the worse it gets so this would be great coming in to the summer season of lots of rounds ????️‍♂️????️‍♂️????️‍♂️

      Reply

      Cory Kitchen

      3 years ago

      I am a chronic tennis elbow sufferer who has had multiple cortisone shots in the past with minimal success. Would love to be a tester.

      Reply

      Ed

      3 years ago

      I have chronic tennis elbow on both sides as I am an avid golfer and golf instructor. I would love to be a tester.

      Reply

      Seth Morse

      3 years ago

      I suffer from tennis elbow, occasionally it’ll flare up and feel worse. I’ve done stretches etc but it always comes back. I’d definitely like to test this!

      Reply

      Steve S

      3 years ago

      Well, for mild tennis elbow you could spend hundreds or just do this:

      https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/recovery/epicondylitis-therapeutic-exercise-program/

      After a week of these exercises I have no pain and stronger muscles. YMMV.

      Reply

      Scott pearson

      3 years ago

      Great article will try

      Reply

      John

      3 years ago

      I am interested in this device. I have had tennis elbow in my right arm, which I treated with physical therapy: the dull butter ‘knives’, warm gel, exercises, and ice. It was very effective and I haven’t had a relapse (I always ice my elbow after playing tennis, or if I feel something coming on). This summer I strained my left elbow, and I’ve been doing the exercises/stretches, but I have not worked with a physical therapist (hello Covid times) to try and recover.

      This device is intriguing, and since it can be purchased using FSA/HSA dollars, I am even more interested, since we’ve been underspending on medical this year, too.

      Reply

      Tina - Sta Active

      3 years ago

      John – the E5 Fiix Elbow replicates the same procedure you had performed on your arm that you described. Like you said – PT works but nobody wants to do it. Treatment with the E5 is easy – you can do it during a zoom meeting, watching NetFlix or just relaxing at home.

      Reply

      Ed

      3 years ago

      Hi,
      I have suffered “inner” tennis or golfers elbow severly left and right arms for months. I just di too much, never rested, kept on playing, hitting balls, cut the trees , mowed the lawn etc, etc. until it was just too much for my elbows. Ice and massages did not help too solve the problem. I checked the web for cures and (there is a lot of stuff out there which did not work for me) I found one which really helped me very quickly. It is an light weight forearm excersise which I did three times a week. Takes only 10 minutes each time. After doing it just one week my elbow was so much better that I could go back to exercising and playing golf, hitting hundreds of balls and playing tennis. I cancelled all me physio appointments . There are similar exercises out there but this one just it worked for me : on Youtube: Dr. John Dougherty is his name.

      Reply

      Tim Porth

      3 years ago

      Hey Ed – Tim from Stā – I agree, if you catch tendonitis early and can lessen the pain causing activity and perform stretches and exercises regularly it can help many people. If someone has built up scar tissue over time the Fiix Elbow will break that up and allow the tendon to heal properly.

      Reply

      Drew

      3 years ago

      Agree, the TheraBand is great. I’ve had tennis elbow in both arms and it really helped me recover.

      Reply

      Ed

      3 years ago

      Hi guys,
      I had very bad inner “tennis or golfing” elbow for several months due to differend sports. I checked the web for advice and the one which worked best for me was this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCYbShdTtbk
      I am from Europe, I don’ t know this doctor and this is no ad for him. But I can tell you that after doing it only three for times the pain was almost completely gone. Do it correctly, slowly as he suggests. It takes 10 min only. There are other vids which go in the same direction of training and all I can say that it really worked very well with me. I am back to hitting balls, playing tennis, doing pull ups etc. etc. I can honestly recommend it.

      Reply

      Peter

      3 years ago

      Go see a trained ACUPUNCTURIST. Not a dry needler Chiro or some PT quack. GET WITH THE PROGRAM. Sad to see people wasting time on bullshit wacky gimmicks and PT ignorance. SORRY!! Better luck next time with your obviously non resolved elbow issue that is waiting to turn into a shoulder or whatever. ACUPUNCTURE, BRO. don’t be scared. It’s 2020.

      Reply

      cksurfdude

      3 years ago

      FYI for minor tennis / golfer elbow issues .. and for let’s call it maintenance of the elbows and wrists .. there’s the TheraBand “Flex Bar” that comes with illustrated instructions on how to do the Tyler Twist (not a 60s dance move ?).

      Reply

      Tim Porth

      3 years ago

      I agree CKSURFDUDE – the TheraBand can help for minor tennis elbow issues. The prescription for the Fiix Elbow E5 incorporates similar strength exercises during weeks 5-8. The key difference is the E5 device that breaks up painful scar tissue and adhesions for chronic sufferers. This allows the tendon to properly heal.

      Reply

      Bert pit

      3 years ago

      I’ve had tennis elbow twice. The first time I visited a physiotherapist 20 times. It didn’t help. The second time I was advised to visit a specialized physiotherapist. After just one visit, I was healed. Tennis elbow is a very small but painful inflammation on a tendon. Bloed circulation in a tendens is poor. His therapy consists of cleaving the tendon, so that the blood circulation improves and the inflammation disappears by itself due to good circulation. It is an extremely painful treatment and you have a “Popeye” arm for a week, but I would do it again immediately.

      Reply

      Neil O'Malley

      3 years ago

      Bert, I really need relief.What does “cleaving the tendon” mean? Can you give me contact info for your specialized physiotherapist please!

      Bert Pit

      3 years ago

      https://www.fysiocentrumoptimaal.nl/ ask for Jaap. It is in Holland i’m afraid. “Cleaving the tendon”: what he does is he makes the indury worse than it was before, to stimulate blood flow. He does this by pressing the injured tendon with a rubber wedge with his full weight . It is a method developed by sports masseur “van de Ven” from Eindhoven, Holland. For many years he was a masseur in the top football league. He managed to get players back onto the field very quickly using unothodox methods.

      Tina - Sta Active

      3 years ago

      BERT PIT – the E5 does exactly what you described minus the “Popeye” arm. The E5 massage elements break up the scar tissue and the bodies response is to send healing blood flow to the area. We also have specific stretching and strength exercises to help build back up your grip strength.

      David R.

      3 years ago

      I ran into this problem a few years back and found Theraband flex bars. I believe you can find the exercises on YouTube. Took care of the problem for less then $30 and so far hasn’t returned. Tennis elbow and golfers elbow are two different things.

      Reply

      TBT

      3 years ago

      I literally started getting pain in my elbow that radiates down my forearm to my wrist just yesterday! Tried to play golf today…was swinging ay 75% which worked great for awhile…I was 2 over after 12, my best round in years..but then the pain became unbearable and I was blocking everything way right because I couldn’t swing through the ball…I quit on 17 because I couldn’t take it anymore.

      Reply

      Ray L.

      3 years ago

      I read this article with great interest. I had both elbows operated on in the last 10 years for golfers elbow .(inside elbow pain).. The first time I tried everything, the R&R, a band, physical therapy, injection. It got so bad I finally had it cut. Then my other one starts having pain and when it did I knew exactly what to expect. I actually coerced the doctor into operating on it early because I did not want to put up with allot of down time. I wish this device was around back then because with a money back guarantee you have nothing to lose.

      Reply

      Jon

      3 years ago

      I have really bad golfers elbow. Couldn’t even putt because of the pain, let alone swing a club.

      Got rid of it in two weeks of using vibration therapy using a very small and cheap device called Tenease. Strapped it on the arm and a green vibrating plug massaged the painful part. It was not uncomfortable and I didn’t feel worse before feeling better. It just felt a bit better each time.

      Since then I’ve been fine. I’ve not had any further flare ups. And I’ve lent my Tenease to other golfers who’ve had the elbow problem. All reported a quick recovery.

      So whilst it’s interesting to hear about this new fix, I think that perhaps a more efficient and cheaper solution already exists.

      Reply

      Jim

      3 years ago

      Had bad golfers elbow – PT and stretching, finally Augmented Soft Tissue Manipulation worked (ASTM) , scraping tools to fix scar tissue. There is also a company that uses low level ultrasound Zetra OZ. Expensive but works, pro teams and major colleges use sit all the time

      Reply

      Greg Wyatt

      3 years ago

      So Tony, is this the same as Ulnar neuropathy? I was diagnosed with this and it sounds like the same thing, I’m curious if this STA ACTIVE E5 can work on it as well. Thanks

      Reply

      Tina N

      3 years ago

      Hi Greg – Ulnar neuropathy affects the inside of the elbow (golfers’ elbow – medial epicondyle). The Fiix Elbow is currently in the early stages of testing for golfers’ elbow. It will take approx. 4-6 months of testing to determine the success rate for golfers’ elbow.

      Reply

      Pete S

      3 years ago

      I’d be happy to be a tester.

      Greg Wyatt

      3 years ago

      Thanks Tina I appreciate your response.

      Harry

      3 years ago

      I had really bad tennis elbow many years ago. Tried everything. Physio, acupuncture and cortisone shots. The latter being the worst option as it only hides the pain and when it wears off your still have the condition but you have made it worse. The solution was Egoscue method.
      Strangely the Egoscue method for tennis elbow is not to work on the elbow but the joints above and below, that’s the hips and shoulders..
      The reason you have tennis elbow is because the elbow is is doing something it’s not designed to do in an effort to make up poor range of movement in the hips or shoulders. Did the exercises for 3 weeks. Tennis elbow gone and never returned.
      I subsequently went to see an Egoscue practitioner for a full body check and it was life changing. Still do a set of exercises every day that helps my posture and range of motion.

      Reply

      Dale Owens

      3 years ago

      Phase 2 results can be sketchy because they don’t involve placebo. So if someone improves 60%, it is compared to baseline, 8 weeks prior.
      How much would one improve over 8 weeks of BSC?
      MGS, keep up the good work and doing what you do. The golf community appreciates your research and reviews.

      Reply

      John - Sta Active

      3 years ago

      Dale – you are correct, that our Phase 2 study was not a placebo controlled study. The study subject improvements are in comparison to their baseline values before starting our treatment protocol. With that said, we are extremely excited with the outcomes the study subjects are experiencing. The study subjects are long term suffers of chronic tennis elbow pain (from 3+months to as long as 30-years) who have tried all the common treatments options (ice, heat, NSAIDS, rest-and-wait, cortisone injections, physical therapy, PRP, TENS, etc…) with very little long term relief. We are working with a local university to complete the statistical analysis on our Phase 2 study along with a review of published medical studies on other tennis elbow treatment options for comparison. We will post those results on our website once complete. Please reach out if you have any other questions.

      Reply

      Sean

      3 years ago

      This is good. I have had good results with the Theragun too. Switched to aerotech for a year and a half from kbs tour v and that also helped. My PT said it’s more likely from the mouse than golf. Switched mouse to left hand. Back to steel but lighter shaft (NS Pro 950). I’ve played 17 of last 19 days with only slight discomfort whereas I couldn’t play back to back days before.

      Reply

      Paul O'Neil

      3 years ago

      Lived with this badly for 10+ years – and 100% agree that mouse/keyboard/phone, constantly with your right hand, just never allows the inflammation to pass and it’s a death spiral. Devices like what Tony tried do help – you need very deep forearm massages to loosen the muscles up and get the blood flowing – and you need to do everything you can to avoid repetitive use of devices..

      Reply

      Tim Porth

      3 years ago

      Sean – Tim from Stā – Your story sounds similar to Tony’s (mouse/keyboard and golf) and many others where tennis elbow is caused by multiple activities. Switching things up like mousing with your left hand is a great idea which could very well help. Look for other activities that you perform that could also be contributing to the pain. The Theragun is a great product but percussion therapy is very different than our linear massage. Our linear massage is designed to massage with the grain of the tendon and muscle. This helps break up the scar tissue in line and allow it to heal consistent with the grain. Also – watch out for the lateral epicondyle (the bone where the tendon attaches) – it can be really sensitive and cause a lot of pain if you hit it. Good luck!

      Reply

      Michael

      3 years ago

      Tennis Elbow has trashed my summer of golf. :-(
      It has also trashed my fencing which I do twice a week and have done for 32 years. Double :-(
      I have had pain in two spots: the typical upper forearm ( typical tennis elbow) and the lower – upper forearm (does that make sense) closer to the actual elbow closer to the actual boney tip of your elbow (about 3 inches away) – you can feel the tendons when you wiggle your middle and ring fingers.
      I quit golf and fencing for 6 weeks – have gone to the chiropractor every week for scraping, massage, ultrasound, cupping, and b12 injections (every other week). Ugggg. Now back but it still hurts and still can’t lift a jar of pickles from the lid in the claw like manner Tony describes. Actually the tennis elbow is waaaay better but the smaller damaged tendons continue to be an issue.

      What caused this? I think it is I am 51 but have always maintained strength through full body weight lifting (low weight – high rep Body Pump workouts) but with COVID I work from home and don’t seek off to work out 3x a week anymore – I have gone from 3x to ZERO since early spring. Weak old muscles become injured muscles when you fence fast 20 year olds and our are going from a strong golf grip to a neutral one and trying to rotate the club face shut.
      Why am I rambling . . . to try to motivate myself and anyone else who is similar reading . . . to get back to lifting weights!!!!

      I am not really offering advice – just saying . . . I feel your pain – literally.
      I guess I’ll end with my buddy Dr. Segal’s video – these rubber band exercises have helped with the tennis elbow. Going to incorporate wrist curls for the lower smaller tendons.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rpm8b2-_1mc

      Reply

      Paul O'Neil

      3 years ago

      I’m basically you 10 years ago but I was younger. The key is breaks – if you are on devices all the time it’s the repetitive forearm tension that does it. You cannot be on a computer & phone 10 hours a day – they need to be put down for a few hours to do other things to loosen up the muscles in your arms. For most people, that’s not possible – but that’s what’s happening – so yes, get back to weights

      Reply

      Drew

      3 years ago

      Chiros ae not good for tennis elbow. Go see a qualified physical therapist who specializes in sports injuries.

      Reply

      Matt

      3 years ago

      Having been through a few rounds of tennis elbow myself. Rest and routine alteration is the real cure. Take a look at your story again. You used a device which reduced the effectiveness of your arm to the point you had to alter your routine (use your other arm, or not do that things that caused the issue.) because of pain enhanced by the device.. replace this device with a thumbspike elbow lock cast three, four days a week you’ll get the same results for tendonitis recovery after probably half the time. I do believe in the merits of massaging the tendons to loosen them up as part your recovery but I don’t see this doing any more than your own hands and self control could have done.

      Reply

      Mike S

      3 years ago

      Our son is an avid golfer who suffered from golfer’s elbow. The cure for him was getting a couple of PRP shots into the affected area..

      Reply

      Tim Porth

      3 years ago

      Mike – Tim from Stā – I had a similar experience – about 8 years ago I got a PRP injection in my right elbow and it cost me $300 out of pocket. Today the same office does them for $1K+. It hurt like crazy for a few days but kept the pain away for a few years. Then I wound up getting tennis elbow in my left arm. We see the Fiix Elbow as a step before dropping $1K – and it our product doesn’t work you can get your $$ back. Best of luck to your son.

      Reply

      Anthony

      3 years ago

      Tony, so sorry to hear about your tennis elbow woes and from personal experience appreciate how debilitating it is in prohibiting you from comfortably functioning off the golf course.

      Up until about 6-months ago I had tennis elbow in my left (lead arm) and golfers elbow in my right elbow. Notwithstanding, I persisted in golfing against a physios orders. (My physio did give me an exercise regime which helped). The pain was so bad that I struggled to lift a golf bag with either arm and mishits (hitting the ball fat) were followed by my usual “F@&k” exclamation to a loud “owww F@&K”. After a round, I would need to ice my arms for at least 30 minutes. Driving a nail with a hammer was excruciatingly painful as was shoveling garden soil and virtually anything else you can think of.

      Now after 50-rounds since May 2020, the pain is virtually gone. My fix was a couple golf lessons in early March where my instructor corrected my set-up and grip. I had muscle memory grooved a bad set-up and swing where I was more of a “flipper” than keeping my hands ahead of the ball at impact with iron shots and prone to hitting irons fat. (I am hitting my irons 10-15 yards longer now, and my driver distance is longer than ever).

      Tony, I doubt very much that your tennis elbow stems from a bad set-up and swing mechanics, but it may apply to some of your readers. My tennis elbow and golfers elbow has been something of a blessing as any time golfing now where I begin to feel pain signals that I am doing something wrong with my set-up, how the club is being gripped, etc.

      Reply

      John J.

      3 years ago

      A couple years ago I went to see my primary doctor with tennis elbow… she stated something similar to your experience… when it hurts you’re probably doing something wrong. I had also heard that very often tennis elbow is due to an imbalance in the muscles of your forearm. During the off season, I went to the gum and did a lot of weight work to strengthen the forearms and triceps. By the time golf season came araond, no more pain and it has never returned to the point where I missed playing golf.

      Reply

      G

      3 years ago

      Been dealing with symptoms (on the inner side of elbow) since March. The way you describe the pain in spot on. Even raising gallon of milk into the fridge can be painful. Rest has helped, but the soreness/pain comes roaring back about 1/2 way through a round – and forget about hitting balls on the range. May have to give this a try.

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      Had elbow tendonitis years ago. Forget which is which but one side is “tennis elbow” and the other is ‘golfers elbow. Saw my doctor, who by the way had a lot of experience with injuries as he was the team doctor for the high school football team. He recommended forward and reverse wrist curls. Relatively heavy weight so that 10-15 was a complete set. and I did three sets. (each way) Elbow was better in a couple of weeks. The issue is the muscle tearing wear it connects to the tendon. The cure is to strengthen the muscle.

      Reply

      Cleo Burrows

      3 years ago

      Yes, I had the same thing. Between the wrist curls and rest it went away. If it didn’t I was looking at pro-lo injections.

      Reply

      TonyG

      3 years ago

      This is probably the first of many home remedies that will be posted. I had a physical therapist recommend the following, which worked without cortisone shots etc.
      Ice pack at the end of the day while watching tv and take an anti inflammatory. The key is to sleep at night with your arm fully extended (not bent) to allow recovery. If necessary, tuck your arm into your waist band.

      7-10 days I had minimal soreness. Stopped the ice and anti inflammatory, but still sleep with my arm extended.

      Reply

      Pete S

      3 years ago

      I don’t have tennis elbow (tendonitis on the outside of the forearm) but I do have a similar issue that has developed on the inner side. Would this device also work for that issue?

      Reply

      Jay S

      3 years ago

      Wondering the same thing…. the inside is golfer’s elbow which I’ve had for years. Hoping this device could work for that too.

      Reply

      Tina Nibbe

      3 years ago

      The Fiix Elbow is in early stages of testing for golfers’ elbow (inner side of the elbow). It will take approx. 4-6 months of testing to determine the success rate for golfers’ elbow.

      Reply

      Dan W

      3 years ago

      Same question. Looking at the StaActive website it only refers to tennis elbow (outer side of elbow, aka lateral epicondylitis), no references anywhere to golfers elbow (inner side of elbow, aka medial epicondylitis). I’ve been battling golfer’s elbow for several months., including PT sessions with a TPI-certified therapist who did the manual version of what this device does (along with stretching & strengthening exercises). If the Fiix Elbow device does in fact address the inner area associated with golfers elbow I would definitely try it.

      Reply

      Tim Porth

      3 years ago

      Pete S and Jay S – the Fiix Elbow has only been tested on lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) and NOT medial epicondylitis (golfers elbow). We are in the early stages of testing on golfers elbow but it will take 4-6 months to validate the effectiveness. If you sign up for the newsletter at http://www.fiixelbow.com we can keep you up to date on our progress.

      Reply

      Niclas

      3 years ago

      Hey Tony, appreciate all your work! Have you tried out an ergonomic mouse? No doctor here, but that really saved me from my slight tennis elbow/wrist problems going much worse. Good recovery!

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      3 years ago

      I’ve used an ergonomic mouse and keyboard for years. It’s probably saved me some wrist trouble.

      Reply

      Niclas

      3 years ago

      Thanks for the reply and glad you’re also seeing the benefit (although sadly it wasn’t enough). Drinking from the fountain of youth it is, then.

      Ron B

      3 years ago

      I agree with Niclas. I use a mouse daily and before I switched to the M-soft “Sculpt” mouse and keyboard, the pain was so bad that I was taking a break every 10 minutes. Now that my hand is slightly turned to a more natural position, the pain is gone. It makes a huge difference. Now I only have the back pain to worry about!

      Reply

      Tim Porth

      3 years ago

      After over 2.5 years developing the Fiix Elbow one thing I have discovered is there is often multiple activities that contribute to tennis elbow – for Tony it is golfing and mouse / keyboard. I totally agree with getting an ergonomic mouse and looking at your keyboard set-up (angle and height). Another contributor with the mouse and keyboard issue is the recent work from home situation – many people sitting at kitchen tables, counters, typing on a couch. It all plays into the pain – so look at everything that creates pain or can contribute to it. If all else fails hit us up on the Fiix Elbow. #tenniselbowsucks

      Reply

      Drew

      3 years ago

      If you have tennis elbow go see a physical therapist to get at the root cause of the issue.

      Reply

      Tim Porth

      3 years ago

      Drew – We totally agree with you that going to a Dr or PT to determine if you have tennis elbow is the right first step. The Fiix Elbow is designed to replicate and simply PT therapy at-home.

      Reply

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