Ball Lab – Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash Review
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Ball Lab – Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash Review

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Ball Lab – Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash Review

MyGolfSpy Ball Lab is where we quantify the quality and consistency of the golf balls on the market to help you find the best ball for your money. Today, we’re taking a look at the Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash. An overview of the equipment we use can be found here. To learn more about our test process, how we define “bad” balls and our True Price metric, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

a photo of the Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash golf ball

Let’s start with an admission: the Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash is perhaps an odd choice for our ninth Ball Lab. I’d wager some of you have never heard of the ball. That’s not particularly surprising given that Titleist says it’s for less than 10 percent of the market and, because of that, Titleist doesn’t’ say much about the ball.

And, sure, in situations like these it’s reasonable to defer to the manufacturer’s assessment but given how Left Dash’s performance characteristics align with what golfers want (more distance throughout the bag with enough spin for most around the green), I’d suggest the company is somewhat stubbornly missing the plot.

It’s also reasonable to wonder if part of Titleist’s positioning is about not infringing on sales of the mainline Pro V1 lineup.

At a minimum, the Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash is  a ball that golfers, particularly high-speed golfers, should know about. So here we go.

About the Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash

Titleist describes the Left Dash variant of the Pro V1x as high launch and low spin. Launch properties will be similar to the standard Pro V1x. However, it should spin just a bit more than AVX, the lowest-spinning ball in Titleist’s premium range. From a real-world performance standpoint, it offers the high-launch, low-spin properties of many low-compression (soft) offerings but because of its higher compression (see below), it’s not going to suffer a distance penalty off the tee. In fact, quite the opposite.

The Pro V1x Left Dash is manufactured by Titleist at Ball Plant 3 in New Bedford, Mass. The stated price for the Pro V1x Left Dash is $47.99. It’s listed as a special order item though several retailers, including Global Golf, maintain inventory.

Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash – Compression

a compression chart for the Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash golf ball

On our gauge, the average compression of the Pro V1x Left Dash is 102. It’s the firmest ball in our database. For reference, the Cut Blue DC and Mizuno RB Tour X both average 99 compression while the Bridgestone Tour BX is roughly 98.5 on average. Given the correlation between compression and speed, along with Left Dash’s high-launch, low-spin characteristics, it’s reasonable to conclude that it will prove to be one of the longest urethane balls on the market – likely the longest.

Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash – Weight and Diameter

  • None of the balls in the sample failed to meet our standard for roundness.
  • None of the balls tested exceeded the USGA weight limit of 1.620 ounces.

Diameter measurements for the Pro V1x Left Dash show a ball that’s average in size for the Tour Ball category. This is true for most Titleist balls where the design targets appear to be exactly 1.68 inches – true to the spirit of the Rules without any suggestion of an attempt to navigate through any loopholes.

Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash – Inspection

Centeredness and Concentricity

As we’re coming to expect from Titleist, there’s not much cause for concern when the balls are cut. Across the entire sample, no balls were flagged for significant defects in core centeredness or layer concentricity. Small mantle concentricity issues were observed in a handful of balls.

All of the defects were minor and not expected to have a meaningful impact on performance.

a photo of the core of the Titleist Pro V1x left dash golf ball.

Core color consistency was generally excellent, though it should be noted that there is variation from the balls we cut last year. This isn’t entirely unexpected as Titleist adjusts formulations seasonally to ensure consistent performance as seasons (temperature and humidity) change.

Cover

We observed a single ball with a small blob of paint in a dimple. It chipped out without much issue and therefore was considered minor. Minor pin marks from the painting process were also observed in several balls.

General Observations

As with other balls in the Pro V1 family, the Pro V1x Left Dash offers a thin urethane cover. Greenside spin should meet expectations for the category.

Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash – Consistency

In this section, we detail the consistency of the Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash. It’s a measure of how similar the balls in our sample were to one another, relative to all of the models we’ve tested to date.

The quality and consistency chart for the Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash golf ball

Weight Consistency

  • Consistency (of weight) across the Titleist Pro V1x is good (above average).
  • Weight variation between the heaviest and lightest ball in the sample was minimal.

Diameter Consistency

  • Diameter consistency relative to the other balls in our database is good (above average).

Compression Consistency

Let’s start with the simple part. Compression consistency across the Titleist Pro V1x is good (above average).

  • It’s the only ball in our database that has achieved a “good” rating for each of our three consistency metrics.

As we discussed with our Q-Star Tour review, our compression consistency metric is an aggregation of two compression considerations. When we look at the average ball compression across the sample, we find a seven-point compression difference between the firmest and the softest. That’s not exceptional but it’s solidly in the average range. Standard deviations for the same metric place the ball in the “high average” range.

When we look at the difference in the compression values for the three points measured on each golf ball (what we call the IBCR or In Ball Compression Range), we find an average of only 1.07 compression points. That’s the best value currently in our database. It’s on the high end of good, pushing the edge of our definition of excellent (two standard deviations better than the database average).

True Price

True Price is how we quantify the quality of a golf ball. It's a projection of what you'd have to spend to ensure you get 12 good balls.

The True Price will always be equal to or greater than the retail price. The greater the difference between the retail price and the True Price, the more you should be concerned about the quality of the ball.

Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash – Summary Report

To learn more about our test process, how we define “bad” balls and our True Price metric, check out our About MyGolfSpy Ball Lab page.

The Good

Consistency for compression, weight, and diameter measurements each quality as good. The Pro V1x Left Dash is currently the only ball in our database that achieves a good rating across the board.

The Bad

As we’ve come to expect, Left Dash isn’t perfect. Minor defects, specifically slightly off-center cores, and layer concentricity issues, while not prevalent, are not entirely uncommon either. It’s also a reasonable assumption that some golfers will have an issue with the firm feel.

We should also note that, as a small percentage of the market ball, the Left Dash isn’t produced in the same quantities as other Titleist offerings. With smaller quantities likely come tighter tolerances.

True Price

The True Price of the Titleist Pro V1x Left Dash is $47.99. That matches its retail price, suggesting it’s an excellent option for those who place a premium on quality and consistency from their golf ball.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Dennis

      10 months ago

      I have been a PRO V1X guy for years, always was a high spin player with driver SS avg 98, the switch to left dash immediately provided a little additional distance with mid irons without noticeable change in performance around the greens. Since I still have some reg PRO V1X left I switch some rounds, however left dash just flat out performs better for me.

      Reply

      Brian Martin

      2 years ago

      Tried my first Left Dash today – noticeably longer, more run out on the driver, more than acceptable iron and wedge spin, little hotter off of the putter. I recommend trying them if your a high spin guy as I am – they are pretty darn good!

      Reply

      Golfinnut

      2 years ago

      I have both the Left Dash & Left Dot. I prefer the Left Dot. it has the same characteristics as the Left Dash, but softer, like the ProV1. Both balls are fantastic but my slower swing doesn’t get enough out of the Left Dash.

      Reply

      Samuel Rainey

      2 years ago

      Good article Tony. Also glad “No Putts Given” is back say Hi to Chris. Miss Miranda and Harry but very glad you two are continuing. Left dash is noticeably the best ball I’ve ever played. I have been able to find them locally and have about 6 dozen on hand. Was a little concerned about supply. Because this crazy world. Thanks again for your work Sam

      Reply

      Yasu

      3 years ago

      I don’t know why people here get so worked up with the test result. It is what is is. The knowledge is power but it’s up to everyone what you want to do with the test result.

      We all know that Titleist makes the most consistent balls in the world but they are also the most expensive balls in the market. MGS is only reporting what they discovered in their test. No one is saying do not buy Callaway, Snell, Taylormade, Bridgestone, etc.

      People love TM, Callaways, Snells and that is okay. Keep playing what you like and prefer. Just remember that golf is hard enough already and defects in balls may have some negative impact to your score.

      It is true that most of golfers would not be able to tell the difference between Titleist and Snell or Kirkland balls. Enjoy golf by playing what you like, but just remember that lesser brand balls may not perform like Titleist balls.

      Reply

      Ryan

      2 years ago

      They may not notice (as much) off the tee. but with scoring clubs and around the greens, you will be able to tell a difference in spin and consistency.

      It’s important to get fit for a ball just like a set of irons or driver. You shouldn’t like the V1x, V1, AVX or left dash equally. They are all designed to do different things, for different golfers.

      The ability to produce a wide variety of balls (for all golfers) is a major component in what sets Titleist a part. Aside from being the most consistent or most played this is something that is overlooked and under appreciated in what Titleist does differently.

      Other manufacturers make a high spin, low spin or high launch or low launch golf ball. That’s it.

      Why is Titleist the only company that uses different dimple patterns on most of their balls? Performance and launch. Nobody else does that.

      Reply

      MIKE D

      3 years ago

      I’m 55, play to a 4 index with a driver speed of 97mph. I’ve been using the Left Dash now for about 6 months and it’s the best ball I’ve ever used, bar none. Sure, it’s a bit firmer than I’d like, but the overall performance is outstanding. I can honestly say that it’s 5-10 longer than anything I’ve ever tried before. The spin characteristics are perfect for me.

      Reply

      Zach

      3 years ago

      Agreed. Best ball for my game

      Reply

      Chris

      3 years ago

      I am a pretty slow SS player, about 72 mph with a 6 iron. A friend of mine told me about these balls last spring so I tried them out. They are by far the longest ball off the driver that I have hit. I saw Dean Snell in a YouTube video explaining that all balls go the same distance off the driver. I found that not to be true for me and this ball. It wasn’t extreme but it was farther. Besides the extra distance the LD performed really well on windy days. I don’t think I create much spin but these balls worked really well for me. Putting and wedges performed just like the regular x.

      Reply

      Mel

      2 years ago

      Dean Snell is absolutely wrong. I don’t know who he is to be honest with you but if he actually believes that I wouldn’t listen to anything the man ever said when it comes to the game of golf.

      Reply

      NH Golfer

      6 months ago

      Mr Snell is extremely knowledgeable re golf ball technology. I doubt he said that in context. He was on the Titleist team that came up with original ProV1.

      Greg Woodward

      3 years ago

      Ttileist has made the perfect ball. I’ve tried them all. Love TP5 for the high trajectory of short irons, love BXS for long irons and hybrids, love the straight flight of the e6 and Vice Pro off the driver, and love to putt with Chrome Soft. This Left Dash did outdid every single one of these balls in every categeory. Longer off the tee, and controllable, piercing, and unbelievably accurate flight off long irons and hybrids, incredible and honest feel around the greens with just the right, medium-high amount of spin, a medium height, controlled flight on short irons, and the BEST putting ball ever made. Hands down. Here is the point: this ball does excatly what you make it do. Period. It’s all up to you. No extra help or unexpected reactions off the face. It does exactly what you create, good and bad. But it gives you an honest result, every time. You have to add more speed to short shots and have to putt with more energy – but it is so unbelievably exact in it’s response to chips, pitches, and putts, that the consistency is almost unreal. Putting was a whole new experience; it is much slower than other balls that seem to bounce off the putter. This response took some adjustments but after getting used to it, it is the most accurate and exact putting ball ever, IMHO. I am an average golfer, low of 7, currently a 12. 66 years old, swing speed just below 100. Never thought this was the kind of ball for me. I just bought 6 dozen because I am scared Titleist will change it!

      Reply

      Jack B.

      3 years ago

      With all the layers plus core there is the opportunity to make high or low MOI balls by using denser or lighter materials in the different layers. Has MYGOLFSPY looked into this? What would be the benefit to having weight more concentrated around the periphery vs in the core?

      Reply

      Stevegp

      3 years ago

      Jack B., Volvik does something like that with their golf balls. Read the “Technology” section on their web site. I’m not particularly a fan of their golf balls, but I was curious why they claim their balls are different.

      Reply

      Dennis Beach

      3 years ago

      Well, OK. I guess there are folks out there that play these balls. Me, not so much. I am a higher handicapper, and don’t play any of the “tour”balls, much less do I care anything about them. I play the Callaway Supersoft, and I like it. I don’t lose as many as I used too, but I don’t shoot in the 80’s either. How about a focus on the “value” side of golf. Don’t need to know how many revs a ball spins, but does it play to my game. Starting to sound like a bunch of golf snobs here. How about some reviews on “cheaper” clubs and balls for those of us that do not play everything on tour. Appreciate what you do!!

      Reply

      SCOTT

      3 years ago

      The type of balls you want to play are called ” the lost ball. ” Every course has 25 dozen lay about . and that’s just the good ones . Here’s the secret after you hit your slice off the tee don’t drive up 230 yards and start looking for your ball, go 160 yards make a sharp right then start looking.. The reason players lose so many balls is because they think they hit them farther then the do. The bonus is you might find your ball too. I haven’t bought golf balls in twenty years. Or just by used ball on line for less then half. the price

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      Loved your post! I haven’t bought balls in a dozen years and I play whatever I feel works best to me. It really doesn’t matter what that is because I find enough of everything anyway! But folks, please stop putting those ridiculous markings on your balls, they’re annoying when I have to look at them and even more annoying when I have to sell them. Especially those stupid arrows. Would love to ask someone, did you point this arrow at a 45° angle off the T into the right tree line, because that’s where it ended up. But it’s true, most high handicappers overestimate their distances, probably cause they may not play enough to understand how far they really hit the ball. I play with different people all the time at my course (upscale public). Barring a skulled shot, folks rarely hit it over the green, when they miss they’re usually between 5:00 and 7:00 short.

      Abraham

      3 years ago

      I’m all for doing whatever you want.

      That being said, playing golf at baseline is relatively expensive (equipment, course fees, practice, your time, etc) . The cost of a reasonably nice new golf ball in the scheme of things doesn’t make much of a dent in the overall cost. If you are going to spend 4-5 hours of your life playing golf, why not spend the extra $10 and improve your performance. The old ball that has been sitting there for months may be hurting your performance.

      If you commit to play golf and don’t attempt to optimize, you are actually just throwing money away in terms of wasted time. Just my thoughts.

      CampagnoloBob

      3 years ago

      In fairness, MyGolfSpy has tested 4 low to medium-priced multi-layer golf balls in the last few weeks. The Costco Kirkland Performance+ ($12.49), Snell MTB-X ($28.99), Srixon Q Star Tour ($33.99), and Maxfli Tour (@34.99) have all gone through the Ball Lab. I’m not sure of the value of putting 2 piece surlyn covered golf balls through the Ball Lab would be given the target market for those balls focuses on price and feel instead of performance. Price is a known quantity and feel is subjective. MyGolfSpy seems to focus their tests and evaluations on the performance aspects of golf products that can be measured as a primary consideration.

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      Question for Tony. With the incredible selection of balls out there, do you think formalized, structured ball fitting w/b the next”big” thing? I know some stores & OEM’s do this, But stores don’t want to spend a lot of time on this as they’d rather sell you $1,000 of clubs then $100 worth of balls. A number of the OEM”s have a ball fitting selector on a website, but that’s so “generic” it’s at best maybe a starting point. Some of the OEMs have live ball fitting booths at demo days, but in my area they’re so few & far in-between to make them that option worthless.

      My ball testing consists of going to my course when no one’s there and playing a few balls tee to green & evaluating the results. Of course that’s hard, because not all my shots are hit consistently but I don’t know of any other way.

      Reply

      Jimmy

      3 years ago

      Go out on the course late & play a few holes. I’ll throw out balls in each fairway (typically a sleeve of each) and hit your second shot three times with each ball. Do this every hole to get varying distances/clubs. If your course has enough variety great; if not, ignore where your drive landed to pick a distance that’s different from previous holes.

      Do the same thing around the greens but rather than a structured approach, I tend to just toss them around and try a few different shots with different wedges.

      Then putt with them. Most ball fitters will say that your should start with the putter but I disagree. Starting with the putter makes sense if you’re planning on picking a ball, then fitting clubs around it. I’m assuming you want to keep your irons the same so pick a ball that behaves well with how your irons are built. I LOVED AVX with my blades but bought Mavrik Pro irons & AVX won’t stop at all on the greens with those irons. So I work with the irons as the anchor point.

      The hardest part is the driver. Not everyone can do this but the right thing is to pick the ball based on the other factors, then hit the launch monitor with that ball and your driver. Tune the driver to get you the best results with the ball you’ve chosen.

      And don’t be afraid of your own opinion. Data tells me I should play Pro V1x but my scores love the American Flag chrome soft. For whatever reason, I get up & down a lot and make loads of putts with it. I give up only four yards with the driver. MyGolfSpy sh*ts on soft balls but at driver speeds under 110mph, launch & spin profile mean more than ball speed. Golf is a mental game. Play what feels good to you and you’ll play better. That includes price – if you’re panicked about losing a ball because of what it costs, you’re playing worse. There’s a lot of good $30 balls out there – that wasn’t the case even five years ago.

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      Appreciate the detailed post and response to mine. Unfortunate in that I can go out on my home course and do a lot of testing, I’ve also found that the chrome soft overall tends to be the best choice for me. I don’t own a launch monitor so I can’t go “full Bryson” with this data but I’m comfortable with things.

      Part of the problem, and it’s a good problem for us golfers to have, is that there are so many good bowls out there versus even 6-7 years ago. The problem part, at least for me is, is that you can over-specialize too much and get lost in the comparisons. But as you said, test them out, pick one, and run with it.

      Lou

      3 years ago

      Every ball I’ve played MGS has found fault with. Because I’m 81, and have a slow swing speed, I play balls that you say are slow. The Left Dash sounds hard and fast. Perhaps, this is the ball I should buy that jacks up my drive to 1 or 2’ over my standard 185-190 yards! I threw out all my Chrome Softs and Srixon Q Star Tours because they’re all out of round so fly crooked and go haywire on putts.

      Reply

      Jim P

      3 years ago

      Would a high speed (120+ driver) and high spin (7K with 6i, 11K+ with wedges) benefit from this ball? I currently play the Kirkland Signature 3-piece with value in mind, but am looking at upgrading my ball to something like this, the TP5x, or the Srixon Zstar XV. This seems like the one to beat?

      Reply

      Jimmy

      3 years ago

      You are exactly the target player. You should absolutely try this ball.. I’m a 4 hdcp & don’t have your speed but I’m steep so my spin numbers are similar. I’ve been playing TP5x because the Pro V1x spins too much for me and balloons on the irons. But I’m getting frustrated with the poor cover durability of the TP5x (it’s really awful) so I plan on trying this ball ASAP.

      Titleist wanted AVX-V1-V1x to fit in a linear way of low-to-high flying, low-to-high compression, low-to-high spin. So they changed the Pro V1x to make it this way. Some of the Tour pros who played the Pro V1x it got pissed at the changes and wanted a ball that played like the pre-2017 Pro V1x. This is it.

      Reply

      Jim P

      3 years ago

      Interesting! I will give this a try along with TP5x. The curren Pro V1x is lower spin and higher flight than the KSig 3 Piece for sure, but I think I could go further and get more benefits.

      Kourt

      3 years ago

      Definitely don’t play the kirkland. It’s one of the spinniest golf balls out there and also one of the slowest. I was hitting just a standard pro v1 25 yards longer than the kirkland. If you are a high swing speed player don’t play kirkland. Any pro v1 ball will be great. Left dash could be really good if you don’t mind a firmer feel

      Reply

      Mike R

      3 years ago

      Great article. I tried this ball a couple of months ago based on a suggestion from a Titleist rep and it definitely works well for me. I was playing the ProV1X and loved the launch characteristics of it but I wanted a little less spin with my PW – 6 iron. My driver clubhead speed is 115-120 mph and I hit my irons hard as well. As for the feel. To me it didn’t feel much if any firmer than the ProV1X I was playing. I also still get plenty of spin around the greens and with pitch shots as well.

      From what I was told. This ball was actually developed for some tour players who wanted the high launch of the PROV1X but a little less iron spin. I tried to find out if Titleist would be expanding their in store line up to include the Left Dash but couldn’t get an answer from the rep I spoke with so I assume not.

      Reply

      Mark

      3 years ago

      Thanks for this article Tony. I have been playing this ball since August and it has everything I have been looking for in a golf ball. For me, the ProV1X had too much spin, especially with my irons. This ball brought my spin down and I gained distance because of it. I immediately bought 3 dozen more after the initial trial. I would like to thank Titleist for making this ball available to the public….BTW – could it be that these balls are almost perfect because they are “tour ready” and thus are flawless?

      Reply

      Pauli

      3 years ago

      Will they be doing the velocity is a left dash. I love that ball. . It suits my swing speed and the flight characteristics and spin profile are great. I’d love it if it was in left dash though

      Reply

      James Han

      3 years ago

      Great report! Could you do for Vice Pro Plus?

      Reply

      Steve

      3 years ago

      Head and look at the ball test from 2019. It will show what is good at certain swing speeds.

      Reply

      Brandon

      3 years ago

      Does anyone on tour use this ball?

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      3 years ago

      Yes. It’s not a huge percentage, but it does get tour play.

      Reply

      Gary Kephart

      3 years ago

      Yes, one of the tour winners from last weekend uses it. Darren Clarke used it to win on the Champions Tour.

      Reply

      Mike G

      3 years ago

      Walter, they’re talking about seasonality at the site of manufacture. Depending on ambient conditions at the time the polymers are mixed to make the core and mantle compounds, the resultant material could go out of spec and not produce the target characteristics of the ball.

      Reply

      Stevegp

      3 years ago

      Great review of a great golf ball. Thanks, Tony. I’m curious why Titleist doesn’t more aggressively market this ball. Tony, you could be correct that Titleist does not want to impact the sales and perceptions of their Pro V1 and Pro V1x.

      Reply

      Bryan

      3 years ago

      I’ve experimented with this ball. It’s super low spin. Like, if you already have low spin, then this ball can knuckle and dive out of the sky. In addition to that, backspin can help a ball fly straighter, and of course stop easier. Overall, I tend to believe Titleist’s marketing approach with this ball: it likely isn’t for the masses. ProV1 is reasonably low spin in its own right, albeit not as firm as this -ProV1x.

      Reply

      Kansas King

      3 years ago

      I see the trend with high compression balls continuing. The Snell MTB-X proved that high compression was likely the way to more distance. While marshmallow balls may feel nice they simply don’t offer the performance of a high compression ball. That’s not to say a high-compression ball is right for everyone but it’s starting to look like high-compression balls will be more common in the future. I could see the future “soft” ball having a 90+ compression and the lower-spinning distance balls all being over 100 (based on MGS compression testing). Soft balls will probably always have a spot for the slower swing speeds that simply are out to have a good time and don’t care about performance.

      Reply

      Mike

      3 years ago

      I’m a slower swing speed golfer (85 mph) who doesn’t give a damn about “having a good time” or “feeling good”. I want performance The chrome soft has worked especially well for me. I think too much Kool-Aid has been drunk with this higher compression ball stuff weren’t these tests done with higher swing speed players?

      Reply

      Kansas King

      3 years ago

      If I recollect, I believe the higher compression balls were longer for every swing speed vs. the softer balls. However, compression is not the sole defining characteristic for long balls. The construction, number of layers, compression of each layer, and thickness of the layers also play a key role in a how a ball performs for various swing speeds. While I could see firmer balls being the trend for the short-term, ultimately a combination of factors will determine how well a ball performs for each golfer. Softer balls may very well be longer for certain swing speeds depending on the choice of materials and layers. It should also be noted that length isn’t everything. I stopped playing the MTB-X balls after going through 5-dozen because I found them to be a little erratic. I’ve tried several other balls and like the Vice Pro+ and surprisingly the Spalding Tour balls sold at Walmart.

      Gunter Eisenberg

      3 years ago

      Where’s the performance data? Everyone knows that Titleist’s manufacturing techniques are very consistent and almost flawless. What a stupid article.

      Reply

      Tom D

      3 years ago

      Perhaps the stupid one is you, to be looking for performance data in an article NOT DESIGNED to provide that information.

      Reply

      Bill

      3 years ago

      Just like everyone “knew” that the 2018 ChromeSoft had massive manufacturing defects?? Oh right, they didn’t until MGS exposed that with a similar style of investigation. You want ball data, go look at the ball buyers guide. The whole point of Ball Lab is to dig into the quality of the ball itself. Stupid article…more like stupid comment.

      Reply

      Paulo

      3 years ago

      Even by my standards this is a moronic comment

      Reply

      vincent schiavo

      3 years ago

      Hey guys – let’s get off poor Gunter’s back…he just didn’t understand the purpose of the article. In the future, I’m sure he’ll be more circumspect before shooting his mouth off.

      Reply

      Jake Claro

      3 years ago

      Isn’t his circumspection predicated on us collectively shaming him for his comment : )

      Paulo

      3 years ago

      No chance. #bangunter

      Mike

      3 years ago

      There’s no way MGS can quantify what any differences in any ball they’ve tested in terms of performance effects. That’s a given, and I’ve made that point numerous times. However the purpose of these articles is really to highlight inconsistencies. If you take them for that then you can make comparisons between balls. No one makes perfect balls all the time unless St Peter hands them to you before your first round at that great track in the sky!

      Reply

      Joe Domill

      3 years ago

      Great job testing as always, good to know since I swing very slow and I will not have to spend the money tov try the ball. Great job.

      Reply

      Ronan

      3 years ago

      Just bought 3 dozen on foot of this!!!!

      Reply

      Max

      3 years ago

      Do you guys plan to do the Titleist TruFeel?

      Reply

      Don

      3 years ago

      Interesting. My guess is since they are always producing a small lot of these, they will always be better than the regular balls. More attention to detail since they likely only run the machines for this for a short time and less chance for the machines to get out of spec during the run.

      Reply

      dutch

      3 years ago

      How do you identify left dash? What is the difference between Left Dash and a regular Pro V1X?

      Reply

      JW

      3 years ago

      The dash mark to the left of ProV1 label. Hence “left dash”

      Reply

      Tom D

      3 years ago

      To the left of the “P” in PRO there is a dash.

      Reply

      JP

      3 years ago

      I remember the one season I had these in the bag, bough them by accident in a pro-shop (won a scratch ticket on the way to the course). It was at a point in my game that I def wouldn’t of been able to really tell the difference in performance.

      but now I wonder at what swing speed would you really start to see the benefits from this ball? Was a really big fan of the AVX this summer (first time playing such a soft feel ball) and have switched over to the Tour Speed for the colder months. But if you dont mind trying a firm feel ball, would you be able to grab some of the extra yardage if your swing speed it topping out at 95? I would be nervous of sending these into outter space and not getting any rollout on drives.

      I have always been under the impression you had to be closer to 100 on your driver swing speed to start looking at 4-piece balls, any truth to that?

      Reply

      Paulo

      3 years ago

      Didn’t they only come to retail this season ?!

      Reply

      Bryan

      3 years ago

      They definitely just came out within the last 12-18 months.

      JP

      3 years ago

      Could of sworn it was 2018 i played them, could of been last year I guess though

      Kansas King

      3 years ago

      JP,

      Regarding four piece balls, the thinking is if you don’t swing fast enough to compress the inner core, then they aren’t benefiting you. However, that doesn’t mean it’s detrimental as the inner core is still affecting the characteristics in some ways. The swing speed needed to compress the inner-core of multi-layer balls probably varies on every design as the compression ratings for every layer probably differ in some ways and thicknesses also vary.

      Reply

      JP

      3 years ago

      That makes sense to me, I’m not really sure where I got the swing speed stuff from originally. I guess maybe its a mis-understanding of “not getting everying out of a 4-piece” vs it not actually being “detramental” if you cant swing fast enough.

      I will have to put them against the AVX next season to see which characteristics I really prefer- soft vs firm – low vs high

      Walter

      3 years ago

      Tony, you mentioned “This isn’t entirely unexpected as Titleist adjusts formulations seasonally to ensure consistent performance as seasons (temperature and humidity) change”. They actually change the formula for the different seasons? So they expect people to buy new balls at the start of every season, crazy! Do any other manufactures(Srixon, Callaway, Bridgestone) do this too?

      Reply

      Tony Covey

      3 years ago

      I think it’s a relatively common practice though I’d wager success varies from factory to factory. Environmental conditions impact the materials used in ball construction, so even with environmental controls inside the factory, if you’re not making adjustments, you’re going to see performance variations.

      That said, I recommend choosing one ball and sticking with it. And while for some of us, it can be hard to nail down the number, I’d also recommend buying a season’s worth all at once to minimize variation to every extent possible.

      Reply

      Walter

      3 years ago

      Thanks Tony, yes I agree just buy a season’s worth.

      Steven

      3 years ago

      I did buy a season’s worth of ball, unfortunately they were Srixon Q star tour and after the review I did the salt solution for balance and out of 4 dozen I got 4 balls worth playing. As far as the earlier post, we recreational players would notice the more as it could make errant shots worse it it severely defective.

      John

      3 years ago

      No actual ball performance data? Spin, yard carry, offline, etc.

      Reply

      Robert

      3 years ago

      You haven’t followed this series very closely have you? That was done last year. Ball Lab is more about the quality of production and QA, how many defective balls make it into a measured sample size.

      Reply

      John

      3 years ago

      No. New to this site. Thanks for letting me know its out there. I will go look for it.

      Suggestion to mygolfspy would be if you have done the spec reviews to provide a link in the article to it so people can access it easily.

      Tim

      3 years ago

      I have really enjoyed your Ball Lab series. I find myself looking at the guts of mower-cut balls I find on the course and counting layers, looking at empty covers and wondering what had been on the inside (and why more of the innards aren’t still there).

      But I’ve also become incredibly confused about ball choice — so confused that I can’t remember the last time I bought a golf ball (mostly playing OP’s that I find).. I’ll be 70 in a few months and driver swing speed is probably in the mid-80s. I didn’t start playing until in my 40s so I never went through the “hit as hard as you can and we’ll fix direction later” phase and I’ve never had much stopping power on the greens. Even so, I managed to get handicap index down to its lowest point yet (12.3) earlier this year.

      All of this is a long-winded way of saying (1) I really enjoy your website/articles/No Putts Given videos, etc., and (2) is there someplace you have consolidated ball test info that might help me cut through some of my accumulated fog.

      Thanks.

      Tim (who is still able to golf this time of year in mid-Michigan!)

      Reply

      PaulP

      3 years ago

      You guys are spot on regarding this ball. For me and my game it is by far the best ball on the market. Titleist should consider making this one of its main stream balls. I’ve already turned a couple of my fellow golfers on to this ball. Really can’t say anything bad about it.

      Reply

      John Mazzola

      3 years ago

      Totally changed my game this year! Keep making it please! Took about two rounds to get used to the firmer feel and now I prefer it. I’m 58 years old and am playing the Blue tees again because of this ball! It’s a winner for me.

      Reply

      Chuck Urwin

      3 years ago

      Can slower speeds (85-95) lose distance with this ball?

      Reply

      PaulP

      3 years ago

      Absolutely you have the club head speed for it. Mine is 90-94 and I have no issues with this ball. I also have friends with similar club head speeds that have converted to this ball.

      Reply

      John K

      3 years ago

      Paul, your swing speed is identical to mine. Have you seen greater distances with this ball versus Titleist AVX and or Snell MTB X? Thanks

      Thomas A

      3 years ago

      100% rating from a Titleist ball? I am Jack’s complete lack of surprise.

      Reply

      Mark M

      3 years ago

      ?? Great FC reference

      Reply

      Kevyn Nightingale

      3 years ago

      A great review of what sounds like a great ball. I don’t have the club head speed for it, but thanks.

      Reply

      RG

      3 years ago

      Started playing these balls last year for tournaments and they are an absolute game changer. Your test confirmed my thoughts of how consistent these are from ball to ball and box to box. I know this isn’t covered in your test, but into the wind there is not a better ball! Sleeper!!!

      Reply

      AJJ

      3 years ago

      I’ve played this ball for a few months now and loving the extra distance over the standard pro v1x. Quite a bit firmer and not as much spin with chips around the green is the only downside but you can’t have it all. Believe the 2021 pro v s are gonna be special though and closer to the performance of the left dash.

      Reply

      Lou

      3 years ago

      Gret review as always Tony! Any idea of how this performed under testing with the robot arm? Perhaps I overlooked it somehow but was there any deviation or grouping that might make some users reconsider using the AVA instead?

      Reply

      Jason Shipley

      3 years ago

      Great review of the golf ball. Every one of the parameters and their results as found in the review line up up with why this ball is on the market…Lower spin, higher flight for higher speed swings. Many of the follow up replies seem bogged down in emotional or completely obtuse comments about everything but their thought on how the ball performs. I’m very interested in this ball on several levels, not the least of which is lag putting distance control and short game flighting of wedges. Theoretically wedge flighting should be with this ball should be a plus with a hard core mated with a Ureathane cover, and I’m anxious to to see if putter response is precise for distance control which seems to be the main weakness of soft feel high rebound stuff like most soft feel balls that are indeed soft but wont spin. Heading out for a a dozen and some time on the practice green before playing this ball tomorrow.

      Reply

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