Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x Golf Balls (2023)
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Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x Golf Balls (2023)

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Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x Golf Balls (2023)
  • Titleist has announced new Pro V1 and Pro V1x golf balls.
  • The 2023 models feature high-gradient cores for more distance, lower long-game spin and tighter dispersion.
  • Retail price is $54.99.
  • Availability begins Jan 25.

A photo of 2023 Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x golf balls

The story of the new Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x golf balls is relatively simple.

Before we dig into what’s changed, however, what you need to know is that what’s true for one ball is basically true for the other.

For example, spin properties have changed a bit for both but the relationship between the two remains the same.

The Pro V1 is still a mid-flight, mid spin ball while the Pro V1x remains Titleist’s highest-launching and -spinning option. Compression ratings haven’t changed, either. The Pro V1 is still a high-80s compression ball while the firmer Pro V1x runs in the high 90s.

The more things change …

Both models still offer the same high-flex casing layer that was born of lessons learned through Pro V1x Left Dash. Functionally, it’s a speed enhancer but, again, it’s the same technology used in the current (2021) ball.

Both the Pro V1 and Pro V1x feature the same softer urethane cover as the 2021 ball. For the sake of being unnecessarily technical, the spherically tiled tetrahedra dimple patterns are also unchanged.

Titleist Pro V1 / Pro V1x – High Gradient Core

A photo including the cores of the 2023 Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x golf balls.

Updates to the new balls are isolated to what Titleist calls a High Gradient core.

We’ve talked about gradient or graduated cores before. It’s an exaggerated example insomuch as the center of the 2023 Pro V1 isn’t liquid but the core of the new balls is a bit like a chocolate lava cake.

The idea is that the core is softest in the center and gets progressively firmer as you move outward.

Like the high-flex casing layer, the high-gradient core has its roots in Titleist’s Custom Performance Options: Left Dash (Pro V1x) and Left Dot (Pro V1).

In three-piece golf ball constructions like Titleist Pro V1, the high-gradient core makes the ball perform a bit more like a dual-core model. In true dual-core designs like the Pro V1x, a high-gradient inner core creates even greater spin separation.

The core of the 2023 Titleist Pro V1 golf ball

Before we jump into performance, allow me to address the pervasive myth that high-compression balls are exclusively for high swing speeds (105 mph and above) and low-compression balls are for slower ones. I’ve covered this before so this time I’ll just point out that Titleist fits more amateur golfers into Pro V1x than any other ball in its performance lineup (and that includes the lower-compression AVX).

Very often, slower swing speed golfers struggle to get the ball in the air and most struggle to generate sufficient spin throughout the bag. The issue is compounded by irons with increasingly stronger lofts so, frankly, it borders on common sense that, putting away feel preferences for a moment, a higher-launching, higher-spinning ball makes a hell of a lot more sense than a no-spin marshmallow. “Soft” might feel nice—but it doesn’t spin.

Moving on …

Titleist Pro V1 Performance

A closeup of the side stamp of the 2023 Titleist Pro V1 golf ball

Really what we’re talking about is lower long-game spin without compromising spin in the approach game. That lower spin is the driving factor in both the distance increase (which should be most appreciable with your irons) and tighter dispersion that are the key performance benefits of the new balls.

Titleist says the Pro V1 offers 12-percent tighter dispersion compared to the 2021 ball. That’s a result of the aerodynamic benefits that come from the slightly lower flight and spin. With the lower trajectory, the ball isn’t impacted quite as much by wind and, generally speaking, lower-spinning balls fly straighter.

If you take all of that and surmise that the new Pro V1 is a tick more Left Dot-ish, that’s probably reasonable.

Titleist Pro V1x

A photo of the 2023 Pro V1x including the core.

The Pro V1x is becoming somewhat of an anomaly in the marketplace as most golf ball makers have shifted away from dual-core to the easier-to-make dual-mantle designs.

That’s not the case with Titleist.

“We’re leaning into it,” says Michael Madson. “We see it as a critical design to achieve optimal performance with a high-compression golf ball.”

That lean-in comes by way of a $100-million investment in the ball business. As you would expect given current demands, a lot of that is going towards expanding Titleist’s manufacturing capacity but a good bit is being pumped into R&D with the specific intent of increasing the operational expertise in the dual-core space.

Titleist already does dual-core better than anyone and, instead of shifting to dual-mantle construction like its competitors, it’s doubling down to do dual-core even better.

That’s the future.

The core of the 2023 Titleist Pro V1x golf ball

Pro V1x Changes

The “right now” is that the volume of the inner core of the 2023 Titleist Pro V1x has been increased by 40  percent. The larger inner core gives Titleist greater ability to control the high-gradient core.

If I haven’t been clear: Like the standard Pro V1, the inner core of the Pro V1x is also a high-gradient design.

As with the Pro V1, the result is lower long-game spin without sacrificing short-game spin. As with the Pro V1, you should see more distance in the long game and tighter dispersion.

Like I said at the beginning: What’s true for one is true for the other.

An interesting side note: Pro V1x’s dispersion improvements aren’t quite as good as the Pro V1’s (9% versus 12%). That’s the result of the higher flight and spin properties of the Pro V1x which make it slightly more vulnerable to environmental factors.

If none of this sounds exceptionally revolutionary, you’re right. With both the Pro V1 and Pro V1x, Titleist isn’t making any crazy promises. Neither ball represents a massive improvement over the 2021 model. Both are a little bit better.

A closeup of a slice of the 2023 Titleist Pro V1x

Pro V1 and Pro V1x – Miscellaneous Other Notes

Color, Designs and Patterns – We’re talking Titleist here so it’s no surprise there aren’t any radical (or even non-radical) changes with respect to the Pro V1s cosmetic options.

You can put whatever pattern you want on the new balls so long as what you want is an all-white or all-yellow ball.

It’s not that the company lacks the ability to print lines and patterns and whatnot on a golf ball but, for now, it’s allocating those resources to printing the radar reflective marks on its Trackman-friendly RCT balls.

Eventually, there will be some additional options but the first round of whatever that looks like will likely be driven by PGA TOUR players.

The company may find its way into something akin to the preference-driven designs (Truvis, Pix, etc.) offered by some of its competitors but it’s nothing I expect in the near future, which is kind of a bummer. Patterns are fun.

And speaking of bummers … (Boom! Segue).

A closeup of a Titleist Pro V1 left dot golf ball

Left Dot and Left Dash – There are no immediate updates in the queue for Titleist’s other Pro V1 balls. It’s early but a good bit of the Titleist Tour staff has already moved into the new ball and the new Pro V1x claimed its spot as the No. 1 ball in play at the RSM Classic. That will probably be the story until the 2025 ball comes along.

Once the Tour gets cranking in earnest, Titleist’s plan is to see how much of its Pro V1 Left Dot crowd moves into the new Pro V1. The thinking is that with the benefits of the Pro V1’s aerodynamic package and the softer cover, there’s a chance Left Dot usage will switch, though, Left Dot will still fly lower and spin less than the new Pro V1.

If Tour demand remains high, Left Dot could see wider release (current eBay prices aren’t a good look). If usage dips and Left Dot becomes more of a niche product like the Pro V1 Star, that could be the end of the story.

A closeup of a Titleist Pro V1xl eft dash golf ball

Likewise, there’s no new Left Dash launching alongside the standard Pro V1 and Pro V1x. While I don’t have anything concrete, the between-the-lines read is that something might be in the works. I’d bank on a softer cover, though I should mention that the current Pro V1x dimple pattern on Left Dash would likely push distance beyond what the USGA allows.

As a Pro V1x Left Dash loyalist, I’m a little disappointed by the lack of an update (again). Finger crossed that this isn’t the end of the story.

Retail packaging for the 2023 Titleist Pro V1 golf ball

Availability and Pricing

The 2023 Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x golf balls will be available at retail beginning Jan. 25. The radar-friendly RCT version will launch at the same time. Yellow versions will follow on Feb. 17.

Retail price for the Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x is $54.99 (that’s still $3 less than Clear).

For more information, visit Titleist.com.

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Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony is the Editor of MyGolfSpy where his job is to bring fresh and innovative content to the site. In addition to his editorial responsibilities, he was instrumental in developing MyGolfSpy's data-driven testing methodologies and continues to sift through our data to find the insights that can help improve your game. Tony believes that golfers deserve to know what's real and what's not, and that means MyGolfSpy's equipment coverage must extend beyond the so-called facts as dictated by the same companies that created them. Most of all Tony believes in performance over hype and #PowerToThePlayer.

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey

Tony Covey





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      Peter Booth

      1 week ago

      I’m curious what you all think of the ProV1X yellow versus the white? I did not see it mention here in this article, maybe you’re lumping them together? When I play them they don’t play the same and when I saw your ball test for 2023 I did not see the ProV1X yellow listed anywhere.. maybe it did not perform good enough to be mentioned?

      Reply

      Kevin

      9 months ago

      One purchaser benefit that they should add to their box is the manufacturing DATE. I noticed a long time ago that golf balls lose spring effect as they age. A 2 year old ball is nowhere near the response of a newly made ball. It would also aid retailers in rotating their stock and when to place them at clearance prices.

      Reply

      AA

      1 year ago

      I’ve played Pro-V1 for the past 10 years – primarily because of putting feel. I’m a solid 4 handicap and do not hit the ball very long and loved the all around playability of the Pro-V1. The 2021/2 model was frankly going to be hard to beat.
      Here is my review after 5 rounds with the 2023 model (and my friends who are all +1 to 5 seem to agree with my findings). Curious what others have found:

      1. MORE spin – contrary to advertised on driver shots the ball spins way more. Consequently the misses are accentuated – and its shorter.
      2. 100 YD and chipping – MORE spin. Its actually crazy the spin I was getting and not always welcome. Several times I spun the ball 10-12 yards off the green on full wedges. Chips and pitches were fun because you can be really aggressive.
      3. Putting – crisper. This is the part where I am torn. The older pro-V1 some times felt too soft and the new one feels really nice and crisp..

      Unfortunately today I decided to go back to the 2022 model. Too many odd spin situations. I think Titleist took an amazing ball and did not necessarily improve it. Let me know your thoughts.

      Reply

      Samuel Rainey

      1 year ago

      Tony. Which of the new offerings is closest to the Left Dash. If I wasn’t able to get Left Dash

      Reply

      Golf Pro

      1 year ago

      TP5x
      Z-Star XV
      Tour BRX
      Chrome Soft XLS

      All companies make a high-compression, low spin golf ball that is widely available except Titleist. I think it’s the only thing missing.

      Reply

      DaveD

      1 year ago

      In Canada, those Pro-V balls will be around $72/doz. I’ll try from the previous gen if they go on sale.
      I started auditioning other balls early last year. Got great results with Wilson Triad, TM Tour Response, Oncore Vero X1, and Maxfli Tour X.. I love Snell MTB & MTB-X, but they have morphed into Unobtainium- nothing available from Snell in Canada until who-knows-when.

      Reply

      Adam

      1 year ago

      Spectacular review as always, guys. But there’s absolutely no chance whatsoever that I’ll think for a minute about dropping $55 on a dozen golf balls. It’s getting pretty outrageous. Making it unaffordable for the average golfer to even consider buying.

      Reply

      Mal

      10 months ago

      I have been using the ProV1 for about a year now and I find them to be amazing. Looking forward to hitting the 2023 ball. As to paying the price , I felt the same. But since I have gotten better, I don’t loose ball often so the price balances out!

      Reply

      Scott

      1 year ago

      Wilson Triad or TaylorMade Tour Response it is… ????

      Reply

      Alex

      1 year ago

      I wonder if Titleist is going to offer their but 3 get 1 free dozen deal this spring (it was not available in the US) promotion with the price increase.

      Reply

      Bucky CC

      1 year ago

      Will they be offering these with the enhanced alignment/aim graphics?

      Reply

      Mike

      1 year ago

      I expect nothing but the best from Titleist. Can’t wait till I start finding these!

      Reply

      Mike

      1 year ago

      Got my hands on the new ProV1 and found it to sound and feel a bit firmer than the current one. Not sure I like that. For me the hallmark of the Prov1 was giving you a lower spin and lower launch ball that didn’t feel like a rock or left dash lol. Seems they’ve lost that a bit with this new design. It’s still as good as ever and is probably the best all around ball in golf. The ProV1 does everything good but nothing great lol. But that is actually great because you don’t make any sacrifices in any part of your game.

      Reply

      Thomas Brokl

      1 year ago

      What is different about the 2023 packaging?

      How will I be able to tell that the package I am buying is a 2023-produced ball versus a 2022 or 2021 one?

      I see so many boxes in some stores and pro shops, I sometimes wonder if they are selling 2019, 2020, 2021, or 2022 stock.

      Reply

      Mike

      1 year ago

      ProV1s launch on odd years FYI, there was no 2020 or 2022 version. The 2021 versions have a triangle shape on the box, 2023 version has a bow tie shape that can be seen in the first image in the article.

      Reply

      Gee

      1 year ago

      The Pro V1 alignments also change year over year which helps determine its original release year. See here:

      https://www.titleist.com/teamtitleist/b/tourblog/posts/how-to-tell-which-year-your-titleist-golf-ball-is-from

      Reply

      Darren Jeffries

      1 year ago

      Packaging will be predominantly black,,with some gold, whereas the 2022 packaging was predominantly gold, with very little black. (Prov1)

      Reply

      Mark Chadderdon

      1 year ago

      Great article on the ProV etc. very interesting and informative. . MYGOLFSPY WRITERS SRE EXCELLENT!!

      Reply

      Doug

      1 year ago

      Will the 2021 version go on sale?

      Reply

      Kent

      1 year ago

      It looks like we are headed towards $10 golf balls! At that price, I expect a lot more birdies and eagles ????

      Reply

      Cleve00

      1 year ago

      Agreed! Outright outrage!????

      Reply

      Evan

      1 year ago

      No crap! After tax we’re now at $5/ball.. How good do you need to be to justify the expense? I still loose 3-4 balls/rd.. So I stick to the $30 and under DTC balls. Maybe when 1 ball can last me 3 rounds I’ll make the switch to these. lol

      Reply

      Sean

      1 year ago

      I used to play Bridgestone’s BX range. An excellent ball. Over the last few years, I have improved a lot and I am losing a lot less golf balls.. With the Bridgestone I got 18 to 27 holes out of one till it scuffs up too much. I switched to the Titleist AVX, I easily get 3 rounds out of a ball before I replace it. I spend significantly less on golf balls since I switched to Titleist

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